MILLERD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
John Bruce FERGUSON
By Anne MILLERD Thursday, June 19, 2003- page A18
Chartered accountant, husband, father and grandfather. Born March 10, 1922, in Edmonton. Died Feb.16, 2003, in North Vancouver, of cancer, aged 80.
John FERGUSON's father, a charming but hard-drinking Scot, left his wife and son when John was five, after which he and his mother shared a home with grandparents, aunt, uncle and cousins. A clever boy who was keen on sports, John was known in the grocery stores as the lad who knew the total of the bill before it was rung in. John's maternal grandfather, an inventor and machinist, became an important mentor to the boy. John never forgot his grandfather's kindness nor his father's desertion.
Following high school, John's apprenticeship to an accounting firm in Edmonton was interrupted by the onset of war. He served with the Air Force in Egypt, where he met red-headed Sandy (Flora Jean) REYNOLDS from liverpool. John and Sandy married at the end of the war, and John brought his bride home to Edmonton, where he resumed his apprenticeship. John spoke of the war years as the best years of his life.
John and Sandy had two children, Jean and Ian. John worked days and studied nights. Money was scarce, and Sandy's health suffered in the severe prairie winters. In 1950, when John qualified as a chartered accountant in Alberta, he moved his family to Vancouver, qualifying with the British Columbia Institute of Chartered Accountants in February, 1951.
John worked for Gulf of Georgia Towing from 1951 to 1977, and was an active member of the British Columbia Institute of Chartered Accountants, particularly in matters relating to professional ethics and discipline. In 1970, John was made a Fellow of the Institute, the highest honour it is able to confer on members.
John worked six days a week and most evenings. The family progressed from a motel in Burnaby, British Columbia, to a home in West Vancouver and a family membership to the Capilano Winter Club. While his children learned to skate, he served on the board and helped build sets for winter carnivals. Typically a stern and uncompromising father, John loved to take his children by surprise on Christmas Eve, coming home with extravagant gifts for everyone.
In 1977, Gulf of Georgia Towing was bought out and John retired. He built rock walls, travelled with Sandy, golfed and kept up his committee work at the Institute. John and Sandy enjoyed their two young granddaughters. Sandy's health failed, and when she died of cancer in 1984, John said, "There are people who just say they're sorry, and there are people who leave muffins on your doorstep or ask you to lunch. I found out who my Friends were."
In 1985, John married Babs MILLERD (née Dorothea STEWARD/STEWART/STUART,) also widowed. Attached to a large and comparatively chaotic clan, John made himself useful. He administered an educational trust fund for the 21 MILLERD grandchildren, and dispatched advice on financial matters. He took particular interest in a business started by Babs's youngest son and his wife, teaching them bookkeeping and coaching them in proper business practice, advising "Always remember the receiver general is a partner in your business."
In the last years of his life, John gave up curling, but continued to golf. He devoted himself to the care of Babs, as she became less able to care for herself. John became ill in the last few months of his life, but remained lucid, loquacious, and fond of maxims to the end. "Always do your best," he would say, as well as, "Nothing else is good enough."
John FERGUSON is survived and missed by his wife Babs, son Ian FERGUSON, daughter Jean ELLIS, grandchildren Ursula, Jessica and Julian, great-grandchildren Sam and Tyler, and by all the MILLERD clan.
Anne MILLERD is a step-daughter-in-law of the late John FERGUSON.

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MILLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
FAICHNEY, Kathryn Helena (née SIEGNER)
Kay died December 26, 2003, at Victoria Place, Kitchener, Ontario, after a period of declining health related to Alzheimer's Disease. She turned 81 on May 30 of this year.
Wife for 55 years of the late Leslie FAICHNEY. Mother of Sheila (Paul MURDOCK), John, and Jennifer (Paul MILLETT). Grandmother of Sara (Cameron SMITH) and Thomasina MURDOCK. Sister of John SIEGNER (Mary SCHAFER) and Carolyn (Stephen BURKART.) Sister-in-law of Bette FAICHNEY.
Kay grew up in Kitchener and recalled with special fondness her grandparents J.M. and Helena SCHNEIDER. She studied history and library science at MacMaster and Toronto Universities, and pursued careers as a librarian and homemaker, living in Montreal, New York State, New Jersey, Ohio, and Kitchener-Waterloo. In recent years she was active in the Canadian Federation of University Women. She found pleasure in books, theatre, and jazz, but took her greatest satisfaction in her family and Friends.
Special thanks to many devoted caregivers at Victoria Place, as well as, particularly, Bekira, Hedy, Jackie, Tania, Sarah, and Sky.
Friends will be received at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, on Wednesday, December 31, 2003, from 1-2 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel at 2 p.m., Margaret NALLY officiating. Interment (private) at Woodland Cemetery, Kitchener, will occur prior to the service.

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MILLIKEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
Robert Hugh MILLIKEN
By Judy MILLIKEN, Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - Page A18
Artist, cosmopolitan, son, brother, friend. Born January 31, 1957, in Regina. Died May 13 in Toronto, of kidney disease, aged Rob MILLIKEN lived life with a twinkle in his eye. It is entirely fitting that his ashes should be interred in his childhood playground the yard of the historic country church next to the family cottage at Katepwa Lake in Saskatchewan.
As a child, Rob was a welcome addition to our family; a new potential ally for his three older sisters. To include him in sibling adventures ensured his good-natured hijinks would liven things up. Always sunny in nature, Rob was a thoughtful, sensitive soul who, above all, loved to laugh.
At an early age he learned that you never have to be alone -- you just have to make Friends with the person next to you. The range of his Friendships was limitless. He was colour-blind and cosmopolitan. He enjoyed meeting people from diverse backgrounds and learning their perspectives on life. He understood as a child that Friendship knows no age boundaries.
As an adolescent, Rob rebelled without going far astray. Instead of immediately pursuing university studies, he moved to Quebec City where he worked as a waiter and then as a calèche driver. He learned French and later became fluent in Spanish. He was fuelled by his strong desire to communicate and he simply refused to remain silent for long!
When Rob returned to school, he studied Fine Arts at Concordia in Montreal. He then went to New York to launch his career as a graphic artist but, after a short time, he was forced to return to Canada when he learned he had suffered irreversible kidney failure.
For the rest of his life, Rob lived with the incredible discipline necessary to keep himself alive. He received a kidney transplant in early 1988. Freed from dialysis for a few years, Rob worked both as a graphic artist and as a curator of showings for young artists.
He loved Montreal but ultimately settled in Toronto where he spent the last 10 years of his life. He returned to school at York University to study ecology and then worked as a graphic artist and website designer. (Friends joked that he was the only person they knew with a pack of gum as his business card.)
Rob's transplanted kidney failed in 1997 and, after years on anti-rejection drugs, he was not anxious to have another transplant. For the last years of his life, he lived via peritoneal exchange that kept him close to home, although he did manage to travel with Friends to France and to Cuba.
Rob had a wicked sense of humour. For example: In his late teens, Rob, and brother Jack, celebrated Rob's birthday with supper at the Keg. Familiar with the restaurant scene, Rob warned Jack en route: "Don't you dare have them sing Happy Birthday to me or I'm leaving!" Jack heard the message loud and clear. After supper however, Jack returned from the washroom to be met by a chorus of waiters. Rob had arranged for them to sing Happy Birthday to Jack!
Rob had an enlightened perspective on life and on people. He was one of those rare souls interested in establishing a genuine rapport with almost every one he met. You never knew where Rob would make his next friend -- the hospital, the movie lineup, the local coffee shop. One thing you could always count on about Rob's Friends -- each would be a thoughtful, interesting person who was well worth getting to know. Many of Rob's Friends were devastated at his passing -- not simply to lose him, but because his life ended when he was still so young.
Rob lived his life fully because, above all, he was fully present. You know he had lived well when even the local Starbucks staff sends flowers!
Judy is Rob's sister.

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MILLMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
MILLMAN, Doris A. (NEWMAN) (née ARNETT)
Always to be lovingly remembered by her large extended family, Doris Angelina (née ARNETT) (NEWMAN) MILLMAN died Sunday, March 9, 2003, at Lindenwood Manor, Winnipeg, at the age of 96. The second oldest of the four children of the late T.L. and Leila ARNETT (née GRANT,) Doris Angelina was born December 1, 1906 in Souris, Manitoba. In 1923 her father moved his appliance manufacturing business to Winnipeg. Doris attended Wesley College, then part of the University of Manitoba, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1927. She played competitive ice hockey for the university women's team, and was an avid tennis player. After university, Doris worked for the Royal Bank of Canada where she met Lincoln R. NEWMAN, also of Winnipeg. They married in 1934. During the Second World War, his career took them, and their two sons, to Calgary and Toronto, and, at the end of the war, to England where Linc ran Royal Bank of Canada's London office and Doris re-established the family. In 1950 they returned to Canada to live in Montreal. After her husband's death in 1955, Doris returned to Winnipeg with family. She became an active member of the University Women's Club. In 1963, Doris married H.T. (Ted) MILLMAN, a widower, engineer, and builder of Canada Safeway stores across Western Canada. After their marriage, his three children became an important part of her life. Doris maintained her home for nearly two decades after Ted's death in 1984. Just three months ago, she moved successfully to an apartment at Lindenwood Manor, where she was happy. While highly capable and independent, Doris always appreciated the care and support of her sister, Frances BOWLES, and her brother-in-law, the late Richard S. BOWLES, former Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba; and since Ted MILLMAN's death, the continued devotion of his youngest child, Alison KENNEDY, whom Doris raised as her own daughter. Doris is also survived by her sons, print journalist Roger NEWMAN (Janice,) Gimli, Manitoba journalist and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster, Don NEWMAN, (Shannon DAY,) Ottawa, Ontario; stepsons, architect Hartley Vance MILLMAN (Claudia,) Ottawa, and retired school principal Bob MILLMAN (Linda CHERNENKOFF,) Winnipeg; sisters-in- law Joyce NEWMAN and Bernie ARNETT, Winnipeg; ten grandchildren; ten great-grandchildren and numerous also treasured nieces and nephews. Her memorial service was held in Winnipeg, Wednesday, March 19th, at Westminster United Church where Doris was a member for nearly 40 years. She died on her way to a church service. Doris was cremated and buried at Brookfield Cemetery between her beloved husbands. She was also predeceased by her cherished parents and brothers Tom and Sheldon ARNETT; brothers- and sisters-in-law; daughter-in-law Audrey-Ann NEWMAN and grand_son Lincoln Taylor NEWMAN. Doris Angelina Arnett Newman MILLMAN will be remembered by her family as a cheerful, positive, intelligent, independent and nurturing person. She was caring and compassionate no matter what the circumstances. In lieu of flowers, donations in Doris Millman's memory may be made to the Lincoln Taylor Newman Bursary Fund to assist promising students in need; cheques payable to Queen's University, and sent to the attention of the L.T. Newman Fund, Queen's Office of Advancement, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6.
''Love never ends.'' (1 Corinthians 13: 8)

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MILLMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
Died This Day -- Peter MacKenzie MILLMAN, 1990
Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
Astronomer born in Toronto on August 10, 1906; 1933, an astronomer at University of Toronto; 1955, joined National Research Council as head of upper-atmosphere research; awarded U.S. National Academy of Sciences medal for study of meteors; 1984, Minor Planet No 2904 named Millman.

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MILLOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
BLYTH, Reverend Patricia (née WILLIAMS) M.A. (Oxon)
Born January 10, 1916, Reigate, England; died, after a long and impressive life - as war bride, army wife, teacher, headmistress, diplomatic spouse, priest, chaplain, volunteer - in Ottawa on May 20, 2003, with her children at her side. Dearly beloved wife of the late David Wilson BLYTH. Much loved and loving mother of Susan PERREN, Sally BLYTH (Alan BULL,) Carol FINLAY (Bryan,) Molly BLYTH (John MILLOY,) Jane O'BRIAN (Geoffrey) and Sam (Rosemary PHELAN.) Loving grandmother to Max (Sarah,) Bianca and Henry Emily (Brian) and Megan; Molly (Sam) and Charles; Michael-John, Bridget, Jeremy and Clare; Patrick and Katie; Frannie and Maddie great-grandmother to Quinn and Rachel. Mourned by her many Friends and colleagues, including those at Rideau Place, Island Lodge and St. Bartholomew's Church. A celebration of her life with Holy Eucharist will take place at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, 125 MacKay Street, Ottawa, Friday, May 23, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Primate's World Relief Development Fund, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto M4Y 2J6 (or through www.pwrdf.org). Funeral arrangements with the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, Ottawa 613-233-1143 Condolences/donations at: mcgarryfamily.ca

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MILLS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Theodor NAGLER
In loving memory of Theodor (Ted) NAGLER, 76 years, Friday evening, October 24, 2003 at the Mindemoya Hospital, Manitoulin Island.
Beloved husband of Marie (BURT) NAGLER. Loving father of Dr. James (Faye) NAGLER,
Susan (Larry) TOBIN, Marcia (Michael) BOND. Cherished Papa and Grandpa of Emily and Lauren NAGLER, Felice, Jocelyn, Benjamin and Jacob TOBIN, and Jenna and Rebecca BOND. Dear brother of Maria PETROVIC (husband Stephan (predeceased) of Kapuskasing (formerly Sudbury) and Lydia NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria. Predeceased by his mother Maria and father Josef NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria and brother-in-law Harold (Rena) BURT. Sadly missed by nieces Anne MILLS and Mary Lynn WILSON, and nephew Stephan PETROVIC. Ted retired in 1986 as Director of Plant Maintenance after 30 years of service at Sudbury Memorial Hospital. Following his retirement he moved to Mindemoya where he enjoyed all the outdoor activities each season brings on the Island.
Visitation was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Island Funeral Home

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-12 published
MILLS, N. Elspeth
Died in Ottawa after a long bout with cancer, on Saturday, March 8, 2003, age 83 years. Dearly loved wife for 60 years of Lennox MILLS. Sadly missed by sons Victor and David, daughter Katharine, brother Ian MacLEAN, and grand_sons Tim and Duncan JOHNSON and Blair and Brian MILLS. A private service was held following cremation. Interment Metis Beach, Quebec.

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-19 published
Coach, administrator, MILLS dead at 76
By James Christie Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - Page S7
Don MILLS, a fixture on the Canadian track and field scene for more than 40 years as a coach, administrator and volunteer, has died at 76. MILLS, of Oakville, Ontario, was a founder of both the Toronto Striders and Track West clubs. He died last Sunday in Windsor, Ontario, where he'd been at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport indoor championships assisting with the University of Toronto team. MILLS also served as an official and meet director with the Ontario Track and Field Association and received the government of Ontario's special achievement award for his work as a volunteer administrator.

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
His passion was coaching
He worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years, but his spare time was devoted to training athletes
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 6, 2003 - Page R7
An era has ended in Canadian track-and-field athletics. Don MILLS, coach, administrator and volunteer, died in Windsor, Ontario, last month. He was 75.
The folklore surrounding Mr. MILLS, who was most recently an assistant coach with the University of Toronto's track-and-field and cross-country teams, was that he never missed a meet, often attending more than one on a weekend.
Mr. MILLS was at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport championships assisting with the university's Varsity Blues team when he died peacefully in his sleep.
"For Don, track-and-field coaching and working with young people was his passion, said Carl GEORGEVSKI, head coach of Varsity Blues track and field.
Mr. MILLS's involvement in track and field began in 1963 when he co-founded the Toronto Striders Track Club. He went on to form Track West, in the city's west end, in the 1970s and was a club coach there until the end of the 2002 season. One of his highlights as a coach was the 1978 World Cross Country Championships. Three of the six Canadian junior men there were from Track West. They took home a silver medal.
"If [a runner] didn't have a coach and needed one they would saddle over to Don, said Ian ANDERSON, a friend and fellow coach at Track West and at the University of Toronto.
Known for devoting hours of his spare time to typing out the results of athletes' workouts, giving nutritional advice, supervising workouts and attending what seemed like every track-and-field and cross-country race in the country, Mr. MILLS made each of the athletes feel they were the most important.
"You thought you were his only athlete, said Paul KEMP, a runner who trained with Mr. MILLS at both Track West and at the University of Toronto. But Mr. KEMP soon realized that the same time and individual attention Mr. MILLS gave to him, he also gave to 20 other athletes.
Jerry KOOYMANS, who ran with Track West in the late 1970s and early 1980s, remembers Mr. MILLS dropping by his hotel room the night before a big race to discuss race strategy. Mr. MILLS would pull out the list of opponents and discuss their strengths and weaknesses and how to beat them.
"By the time I got to the starting line, I felt like I was the best-prepared runner in the race, Mr. KOOYMANS said in a written tribute to his old coach.
When he wasn't busy coaching, Mr. MILLS, who lived in Oakville, Ontario, west of Toronto, was volunteering with the Ontario Track and Field Association as an official or meet director. His meticulous administrative skills and painstaking attention to detail are widely remembered. It was not uncommon for Mr. MILLS to travel across the city on a Sunday night to drop off race results to an athlete or fellow coach. He received the government of Ontario's special achievement award for his work as a volunteer administrator.
Mr. MILLS joined the Varsity Blues staff in 1999, where he focused on men's middle-distance running. But his connections with the University of Toronto go back to the early 1960s, when he spent time coaching the men's boxing team. One of the young men he is reported to have coached was former Ontario premier David PETERSON.
Outside of coaching, Mr. MILLS worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years. He started out in biochemistry research in 1954 and later transferred to occupational health and safety where he was involved in purchasing radioactive materials. He routinely ate breakfast at the hospital cafeteria and, even after he retired, continued to visit the hospital daily and spend time in its library.
Don MILLS was born on August 29, 1927, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec. He lived a quiet life, never marrying or having children of his own. He acted as a father figure to many athletes and maintained connections with them. Over the holidays, he would often spend time with the families of former athletes. Not one to talk about himself, his athletes and colleagues knew little about him. Not much is known about his own athletic achievements except that he is said to have played hockey in his younger years. Mr. MILLS, however, remained fit throughout his life.
"He was very quiet, Mr. ANDERSON said. "He was never the centre of attention."
While his workouts could be tough, Mr. MILLS knew when an athlete had endured enough, Mr. KEMP said. He was not one to yell or scream.
"He was patient, he was dedicated. He was committed, Mr. GEORGEVSKI said.
Renowned for never owning a car, Mr. MILLS mastered bus and train routes from coast to coast. Being without a vehicle didn't deter him from getting to a track meet or practice session, no matter where it was held. He became legendary for his uncanny ability to get to meets without driving.
In recent years he refused to fly. Even so, that didn't stop him from attending a National Cross Country Championship in British Columbia.
In order to be with his team, Mr. MILLS left Ontario a week ahead of schedule to travel across the country by train. Two years ago, Mr. KEMP flew to Edmonton to attend a tournament only to be met by Mr. MILLS, who had arrived earlier by bus.
"He was an individual who cared deeply about all his athletes, " whether it was a young, struggling runner or one who was performing among the top at the national level, Mr. GEORGEVSKI.
A track scholarship has been established in Mr. MILLS's name at the University of Toronto. He died on March 16.

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Israel ASPER: A timeline
Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B6
1930s
Born Israel Harold ASPER in 1932 in Minnedosa, Manitoba, the son of musicians Leon and Cecilla.
Even in his youth, Mr. ASPER was a newspaper junkie. As a Grade 10 student he started a newspaper on his own.
1940s
After the Second World War the ASPERs built a small chain of theatres in rural Manitoba and Winnipeg. Izzy was an usher at one of the theatres.
Married Ruth (Babs) BERNSTEIN, who he met in high school in Winnipeg. Like the ASPERs, the BERNSTEINs were immigrants from Eastern Europe.
1950s
Attended the University of Manitoba. Called to the Bar of Manitoba in 1957.
son David, born in 1958, is now CanWest Global executive vice-president.
1960s
Daughter Gail, born in 1960 is now CanWest Global's corporate secretary.
son Leonard, born in 1964, is president and chief executive officer of CanWest Global.
1970s
Member of Legislative Assembly and Leader of the Liberal party in Manitoba from 1970-1975.
Began his broadcasting career when he bought North Dakota's KCND in 1974, moved it to Winnipeg and changed the call letters to CKND.
Buys 45 per cent of troubled Global Ontario network in 1974.
1980s
In 1988 he gains licences for new television stations in Regina and Saskatoon.
Buys television stations in Vancouver and Halifax-Saint John.
In 1988, Mr. ASPER and associates buy out partners in the Ontario Global system.
In 1989, CanWest takes over 100 per cent of Global and becomes CanWest Global Communications.
1990s
CanWest lists on the New York Stock Exchange in 1991.
In 2000, Mr. ASPER moves into print with $3.2-billion purchase of Southam newspaper group from Hollinger Inc.
2000s
The newspaper deal sparked heavy criticism as Mr. ASPER was accused of editorial interference at the papers.
Last year, CanWest fired Ottawa Citizen publisher Russell MILLS after the paper published an editorial critical of Prime Minister Jean CHRETIEN.
Jazz was always Mr. ASPER's passion - his brother gave him a Rhapsody in Blue recording as a bar mitzvah present. In 2002, CanWest opened a Winnipeg jazz FM station.
Died yesterday at St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg at 71.

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Observers hail ASPER contribution
But views on Israel and direction of news coverage also provoked controversy
By Richard BLOOM and Paul WALDIE Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B7
In its early days, CanWest Global Communications Corp. may have had the dubious moniker of The Love Boat network, but there is no doubt Izzy ASPER made "very significant" contributions to Canadian media, industry observers said yesterday.
At the same time, his actions as head of the media empire weren't without controversy.
Mr. ASPER died yesterday at 71. A tax lawyer by training, he is more commonly known as the founder of Winnipeg-based CanWest the parent of the Global network of television stations, and which, in 2000, engineered a multibillion-dollar purchase of Southam Newspaper Group, National Post and other assets from Conrad BLACK's Hollinger Inc.
Glenn O'FARRELL, president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, said Mr. ASPER left a huge broadcasting legacy.
"The Canadian broadcasting system has been built over the last number of decades through the efforts of some fairly significant entrepreneurs, and Izzy ASPER was clearly one of those," Mr. O'FARRELL said. "He brought an incredibly astute vision of what could be done and what should be done in the name of strengthening Canada's place both domestically and internationally."
Mr. O'FARRELL worked at CanWest for 12 years and said working for Mr. ASPER was stimulating. "It was absolutely a privilege to work with somebody who possessed the depth and the breadth of his intellectual curiosity and interests."
Mr. ASPER also provoked controversy over the years with his views on Israel and his drive to converge news coverage at CanWest's newspapers.
In 2002, he fired Russell MILLS, publisher of the Ottawa Citizen, after an apparent conflict over editorial independence. At the time, CanWest forced papers across the chain to carry editorials written by officials in the company's head office. The policy sparked a barrage of complaints about a lack of editorial freedom at the papers. The removal of Mr. MILLS prompted a wave of protests against CanWest from Parliament to media organizations around the world. Mr. MILLS sued and reached a settlement with the company a few months later.
Mr. ASPER's staunch defence of Israel also left him open to charges that CanWest's papers do not fairly cover events in the Middle East. In a speech last year, he attacked media coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and accused several media outlets of having an anti-Israel bias. He singled out coverage by CNN, The New York Times, British Broadcasting Corp. and Canadian Broadcasting Corp. and said anti-Israel bias was a "cancer" destroying media credibility.
He has often criticized the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in particular for what he has called the broadcaster's anti-Israel coverage. Yesterday, a Canadian Broadcasting Corp. official declined to comment on Mr. ASPER's views.
Still, amid the controversy, Christopher DORNAN, director of Carleton University's School of Journalism and Communication, praised Mr. ASPER's role in Canadian journalism.
"We're still, in the entertainment area, overshadowed by the exports of the juggernaut to the south. What's really ours is non-fiction, it's journalism... in as much as Israel ASPER built CanWest into a major, major player in that sector, his contribution is clearly significant."
Added Mr. DORNAN: " There are uncharitable souls that would argue that CanWest's contribution to the Canadian cultural landscape was negligible.
"Because when CanWest built itself as a network, in the early days, it was known as The Love Boat Network -- all they did was buy cheap, populist American programming, got ratings and contributed very little to Canadian cultural production. They made very little programming of their own and what they did make was in grudging compliance with Canadian content regulations," he said.
Mr. DORNAN argued that the Canadian media industry is not about keeping the Americans at bay, but instead about funnelling in highly desired American content in the most advantageous way possible.
Mr. ASPER built a television network that now employs "people from network executives to janitors. Those jobs would not have existed had he not done that. And now, of course, they do actually make some programming," Mr. DORNAN said.
Vince CARLIN, chairman of the School of Journalism at Ryerson University in Toronto, agreed, noting that history books won't likely describe him as a great endorser of Canadian culture.
"That's not what he was about. He was a businessman," said Mr. CARLIN, the former head of Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Newsworld, who had met with Mr. ASPER on numerous occasions.
"He learned how to use those [business] skills to create very dynamic business enterprises, but [CanWest] would never put cultural considerations ahead of business considerations," Mr. CARLIN said.
He explained how in his company's early days, Mr. ASPER insisted to government officials that his chain of television stations was not a "network" but instead a "system," because being dubbed a network was less advantageous from a business perspective. When regulations shifted, Mr. ASPER changed gears, calling the stations a network, Mr. CARLIN said.
Mr. ASPER was also involved in a bitter legal battle with Robert LANTOS, a prominent Toronto-based filmmaker. Mr. ASPER sued Mr. LANTOS for libel over comments he made during a speech in 1998. In the speech, Mr. LANTOS described Mr. ASPER as "the forces of darkness, whose greed is surpassed only by their hypocrisy." Mr. ASPER said the comments left the impression he was dishonest and disloyal.

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MILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
'What else could it have been but a miracle?'
Rene CAISSE died 25 years ago without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved. Without Essiac, her mysterious remedy, they wouldn't be alive today, they tell Roy MacGREGOR
By Roy MacGREGOR, Saturday, December 13, 2003 - Page F8
Bracebridge, Ontario -- These days, when she looks back at her remarkable, and largely unexpected, long life, Iona HALE will often permit herself a small, soft giggle.
She is 85 now, a vibrant, spunky woman with enough excess energy to power the small off-highway nursing home she now lives in at the north end of the Muskoka tourist region that gave the world Norman BETHUNE and, Iona HALE will die believing, possibly something far more profound.
A possible cure for cancer.
Twenty-seven years ago, Mrs. HALE sat in Toronto's Princess Margaret Hospital and heard that terrifying word applied to her own pitiful condition. She was 58, and had already dropped to 75 pounds when her big, truck-driver husband, Ted, finally got her in to see the specialists who were supposed to know why she had stopped eating and was in such terrible pain.
Mrs. HALE remembers awakening in the recovery room after unsuccessful surgery and being told by a brusque nurse, "You're not going to live long, you know, dear."
"That's what you think!" she snapped back.
Ted HALE had often heard stories of a secret "Indian" medicine that an area nurse had supposedly used to cure cancer patients, but he had no idea where it could be found. He had asked a physician, only to be told, "That damned Essiac -- there's nothing to it."
When they returned to their home near Huntsville, Ontario -- with instructions to come back in three weeks, if Mrs. HALE was still around -- Mr. HALE set out to find the mysterious medicine. With the help of a sympathetic doctor, he discovered Rene CAISSE, a Bracebridge nurse who claimed to have been given the native secret back in 1922. Pushing 90 and in ill health, she agreed to give him one small bottle of the tonic, telling him to hide it under his clothes as he left.
Mr. HALE fed his wife the medicine as tea, as instructed, and it was the first thing she was able to keep down. A few radiation treatments intended to ease the pain seemingly had no effect, but almost immediately after taking the Essiac, she felt relief. When the painkillers ran out and Mr. HALE said he would go pick up more, she told him, "Don't bother -- get more of this."
Twice more, he returned to get Essiac, the second time carrying a loaded pistol in case he had to force the medicine from the old nurse. He got it, and, according to Mrs. HALE, "the cancer just drained away." She returned to Toronto for one checkup -- "The doctor just looked at me like he was seeing a ghost" -- and never returned again.
"What else could it have been," Mrs. HALE asks today, "but a miracle?"
There is nothing special to mark the grave of Rene CAISSE.
It lies in the deepening snow at the very front row of St. Joseph's Cemetery on the narrow road running north out this small town in the heart of Ontario cottage country, a simple grave with a dark stone that reads: " McGAUGHNEY Rene M. (CAISSE) 1888-1978, Discoverer of 'Essiac,' Dearly Remembered."
On December 26, it will be 25 years since Rene -- pronounced "Reen" by locals -- CAISSE died. But in the minds of many people with cancer, the great question of her life has continued on, unanswered, well beyond her death. Did she have a secret cure for the disease?
Ms. CAISSE never claimed to have a "cure" for cancer, but she did claim to have a secret native formula that, at the very least, alleviated pain and, in some cases, seemed to work what desperate cancer sufferers were claiming were miracles.
She had discovered the formula while caring for an elderly Englishwoman who had once been diagnosed with breast cancer and, unable to afford surgery, turned instead to a Northern Ontario Ojibwa medicine man who had given her a recipe for a helpful tonic.
The materials were all found locally, free in the forest: burdock root, sheep sorrel, slippery elm bark, wild rhubarb root and water.
The woman had taken the native brew regularly and been cancer-free ever since.
Ms. CAISSE had carefully written down the formula as dictated, thinking she might herself turn to this forest concoction if she ever developed the dreaded disease. She never did, dying eventually from complications after breaking a hip, but she remembered the recipe when an aunt was diagnosed with cancer of the stomach and given six months to live. The aunt agreed to try the tonic, recovered and went on to live 21 more years.
The aunt's doctor, R.D. FISHER, was intrigued enough that he encouraged Ms. CAISSE to offer her remedy -- which she now called "Essiac," a reverse spelling of her name -- to others, and by 1926 Dr. FISHER and eight other physicians were petitioning the Department of Health and Welfare to conduct tests on this strange brew.
"We, the undersigned," the letter from the nine doctors read, "believe that the 'Treatment for Cancer' given by nurse R.M. CAISSE can do no harm and that it relieves pain, will reduce the enlargement and will prolong life in hopeless cases."
Instead of opening doors, however, the petition caused them to slam. Health and Welfare responded that a nurse had no right to treat patients and even went so far as to prepare the papers necessary to begin prosecution proceedings.
But when officials were dispatched to see her, she talked them out of taking action, and for years after, officials turned a blind eye as she continued to disperse the tonic. She made no claim that it was medication; she refused to see anyone who had not first been referred by their regular physician; and she turned down all payment apart from small "donations" to keep the clinic running.
Her work attracted the attention of Dr. Frederick BANTING, the discoverer of insulin, but an arrangement to work together foundered when he insisted they test the tonic first on mice, and Ms. CAISSE argued that humans had more immediate needs.
Her problems with authority were only beginning. A 55,000-signature petition persuaded the Ontario government to establish a royal commission to look into her work, but the panel of physicians would agree to hear only from 49 of the 387 witnesses: who turned up on her behalf -- and dismissed all but four on the grounds that they had no diagnostic proof. The commission refused to endorse Essiac, and a private member's bill that would have let her continue treating patients at her clinic fell three votes short in the legislature.
She quit when the stress drove her to the verge of collapse, moved north with her new husband, Charles McGAUGHNEY, and dropped out of the public eye. But not out of the public interest.
"You need proof?" laughs Iona HALE. " Just look at me -- I'm still here!"
Not everyone in the medical establishment dismissed Essiac. Ms. CAISSE had permitted the Brusch Medical Center near Boston to conduct experiments after Dr. Charles BRUSCH, one-time physician to John Kennedy, inquired about the mysterious cure. Tests on the formula did show some promise on mice, and the centre eventually reported: "The doctors do not say that Essiac is a cure, but they do say it is of benefit." Dr. BRUSCH even claimed that Essiac helped in his own later battle with cancer.
Other tests, though, were less encouraging. In the early 1970s, Ms. CAISSE sent some of her herbs to the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in Rye, New York but when early tests proved negative, she claimed Sloan-Kettering had completely fouled up the preparation and refused further assistance.
Through it all, she refused to disclose her recipe -- until a rush of publicity after a 1977 article in Homemaker's magazine persuaded her to hand over the formula to the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario for safekeeping and to give a copy to the Resperin Corporation of Toronto in the hopes that, eventually, scientific proof would be found.
She died without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved, and in 1982, the federal government declared Resperin's testing procedures flawed and shut down further studies.
The story of Ms. CAISSE's medicine carried on, however, with more and more people turning to the man who would have been her member of Parliament to see if he could help.
Stan DARLING lives in the same nursing home as Iona HALE. Now 92, Mr. DARLING spent 21 years in Ottawa as the Progressive Conservative member for Muskoka-Parry Sound. He's remembered on Parliament Hill for his crusades against acid rain, but of all his political battles, Mr. DARLING says nothing compares to his fight to gain recognition for Rene CAISSE's mysterious medicine.
"So many people came to me with their stories," he said, "that I couldn't help but say, 'Okay, there must be something to this.'"
Mr. DARLING put together his own petition, 5,000 names, and went to the minister of health and argued that so many were now using Essiac it made sense to legalize it.
His bid failed, but he did persuade the medical bureaucrats to compromise: If Essiac were seen as a "tea" rather than a "drug," it could be viewed as a tonic, and so long as the presiding physician gave his approval, it could be added to a patient's care -- if only for psychological reasons. "On that basis," Mr. DARLING says, "I said, 'I don't give a damn what you call it, as long as you let the people get it.' "
The doubters are legion. "There's no evidence that it works," says Dr. Christina MILLS, senior adviser of cancer control policy for the Canadian Cancer Society. That being said, she says, "There is also little evidence of harmful side effects from it," but cautions anyone looking into the treatment to do so in consultation with their physician.
No scientific study of Essiac has ever appeared in an accepted, peer-reviewed medical journal. But those who believe say they have given up on seeing such proof.
Sue BEST of Rockland, Massachusetts., still vividly recalls that day 10 years ago when her 16-year-old son, Billy, sick with Hodgkin's disease, decided to run away from home rather than continue the chemotherapy treatments he said were killing him.
He was eventually found in Texas after a nationwide hunt and agreed to return home only if the treatments would cease and they would look into alternative treatments, including Essiac.
No one is certain what exactly cured Billy, but Ms. BEST was so convinced Essiac was a major factor she became a local distributor of the herbal medicine.
Rene CAISSE, she says, "spent a whole life trying to help people with a product she found out about totally by accident -- and being totally maligned all her life by the whole medical establishment in Canada."
In some ways, Ms. CAISSE has had an easier time in death than in life. Today, there is a street in Bracebridge named after her, a charming sculpture of her in a park near her old clinic, and Bracebridge Publishing has released a book, Bridge of Hope, about her experiences.
The recognition is largely the work of local historian Ken VEITCH, whose grandmother, Eliza, was one of the cancer-afflicted witnesses: who told the 1939 royal commission: "I owe my life to Miss CAISSE. I would have been dead and in my grave months ago." Instead, she lived 40 more years.
Don McVITTIE, a Huntsville businessman, is a grandnephew of Rene CAISSE and says she used her recipe to cure him of a duodenal ulcer when he was 19. Now 71 and in fine health, he still has his nightly brew of Essiac before bed.
"There's something mentally satisfying about having a glass of it," he says. "I think of it more as a blood cleanser. That's what Aunt Rene always said it was. I think she'd be disappointed it hasn't been more accepted."
"Look," Ken VEITCH says, "this all started back in the 1920s. And I've said a number of times that if there was nothing to it, it would be long gone.
"But there is something to it."
Roy MacGREGOR is a Globe and Mail columnist.
The secret revealed
Debate rages in Essiac circles about the correct recipe. The most accurate rendition likely comes from Mary McPHERSON, Rene CAISSE's long-time assistant. Ms. McPHERSON, currently frail and living in a Bracebridge nursing home, swore an affidavit in 1994 in which she recorded the recipe in front of witnesses. It is essentially the same preparation distributed today by Essiac Canada International, which operates out of Ottawa. The formula appears below:
61/2 cups of burdock root (cut)
1 lb. of sheep sorrelherb, powdered
1/4 lb. of slipper elm bark, powdered
1 oz. of Turkish rhubarb root, powdered
Mix ingredients thoroughly and store in glass jar in dark, dry cupboard. Use 1 oz. of herb mixture to 32 oz. of water, depending on the amount you want to make. I use 1 cup of mixture to 256 oz. of water.
Boil hard for 10 minutes (covered), then turn off heat but leave sitting on warm plate overnight (covered).
In the morning, heat steaming hot and let settle a few minutes, then strain through fine strainer into hot sterilized bottles and sit to cool. Store in dark, cool cupboard. Must be refrigerated when opened.

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MILLSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
James Athey BECKETT
At Chelsey Park Nursing Home, London on Sunday, January 19, 2003 James Athey Beckett of London, formerly of Kitchener and born in Sunrise Kentucky, in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Ruth (MILLSON) BECKETT. Dear father of Ruth Ann BASTERT and Nancy BELL of Sheguiandah, Manitoulin Island, Mary Lou BECKETT and Chuck EBERLEY of Ottawa, Sandy Lee BECKETT of London. Dear grandfather of Peggy, Shawn, Ian and Wendy, Matthew and Aaron. Also survived by nine great-grandchildren. Predeceased by brothers John and Bud and a sister Suzanna. Friends called at the C. Haskett and son Funeral Home, 223 Main Street, Lucan on Monday, January 20 where the funeral service was held on Tuesday, January 21 with Reverend Fred McKINNON officiating. Cremation with interment St. James Cemetery, Clandeboye. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com

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MILNE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
SHAWANA
-In loving memory of an unforgettable friend, Lloyd, who passed away February 25, 2003.
May the Great Spirit be your guiding light.
-Jim MILNE and Friends.

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MILNE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Jean SABOURIN
Jean Mary SABOURIN passed away at the West Parry Sound Health Centre, Church St. on Thursday, October 9, 2003 in her 69th year.
Beloved wife of Wilf SABOURIN. Loving mother of Steven and his wife Jill of Ajax, Phillip SABOURIN and Sandra (MILNE) of Parry Sound. Dear sister of William and his wife Jean CUNNINGHAM of Little Current and the late Ralph (wife Goldie of Little Current). Lovingly remembered by her Aunt Rose PATON of North Bay. Fondly remembered by her nieces, nephews, other relatives and Friends.
Friends were received at the Logan Funeral Home, 81 James Street, Parry Sound on Saturday, October 11, 2003 prior to the service in the Logan Memorial Chapel at 1: 00 pm.

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