SCHREYER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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SCHROEDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
LENT, Maida Mary Freda (née SCHROEDER) M.A. Queen's University
Suddenly on March 2nd, 2003 at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Science Centre in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Elton LENT (1998.) Left to mourn are his daughter Ellie LEGGE (Randy) and his son Ryck LENT (Barbara,) grandchildren Dallas and Devin LEGGE and Krissa and Tiffany LENT, great-grand_son McLeod WILSON, nephews Tony and David (Mary FINCH.) Predeceased by her sister Ilse FINCH. Maida taught French and German ay Galt Collegiate, Scarborough Collegiate and Humberside C.I. in Toronto. According to her wishes, her body has been donated for research to the University of Toronto. A Memorial Service will be held at Eglinton St. George's United Church, 35 Lytton Blvd. (at Duplex) on Thursday, March 13th at 1 p.m. with a reception afterwards in the Eglinton Room. If desired, remembrances may be made to the charity of your choice.

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SCHULER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-17 published
MacPHERSON, Harvey Alexander
Died October 16th at Saint Mary's Hospital in Kitchener, Ontario. Harvey celebrated his 90th birthday earlier this year at The Village of Winston Park where he was a resident. Born on March 2, 1913 in Macton, Ontario to John and Elsie (née REAMAN) MacPHERSON, Harvey was the eldest of three children. His brothers Ron and Grant predeceased him. In the 1930's Harvey learned to fly, and after a stint of bush pilot work in northern Ontario with Algoma Airways, became the chief flying instructor with the Kitchener Waterloo Airport. When war broke out, the Kitchener Waterloo Airport was contracted to open a flight training school in Goderich for the Empire Flight Training Program. In 1940, Harvey went to Goderich as Chief Flying Instructor and trained hundreds of pilots for the Commonwealth. Before leaving, Harvey married Elizabeth Jean Gartshore LAING, the daughter of Reverend A.A. and Marion LAING. Harvey met Elizabeth when her father was the minister at Linwood United Church where he attended. During the war, Harvey joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. At war's end he took a job with Dominion Rubber (now Uniroyal) in Kitchener. In 1958, Harvey took over the operation of Caya Fabrics Ltd. and later became its sole owner. He managed the business until the early 1990's when he retired. Harvey, Elizabeth (Betty) and their family were active members of Trinity United Church in Kitchener for many years. Betty passed away in 1975 after a long battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Harvey is survived by his children; Doug MacPHERSON (wife Kathy MacPHERSON,) Barbara BUTLER (husband Bob,) and Bruce MacPHERSON (wife Catherine SCHULER,) and four grandchildren Jason and Brett BUTLER and Matthew and John MacPHERSON, all of Toronto. He is survived also by his friend and companion, Jean CAYA. The funeral service will be held at the Ratz-Bechtel Funeral Home at 621 King Street West, Kitchener on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. Visitation will be at the funeral home prior to the service starting at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donation in memory of Harvey to your favourite charity would be appreciated.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-03 published
Virtuoso possessed 'nerves of steel'
Ontario trumpeter and music professor renowned for his recordings and his mentoring
By Sol CHROM Friday, January 3, 2003, Page R11
He could make his trumpet sing like an angel, but he was not above taking a hacksaw to it. When Erik SCHULTZ died of cancer last month at the age of 50, Canadian music lost a virtuoso player, a teacher and mentor, a prolific recording and performing artist, and a man renowned among colleagues as a consummate professional.
A member of the music faculty at the University of Western Ontario, Prof. SCHULTZ also made several concert tours of Europe and founded an independent recording label for Canadian musicians. He held positions with Canadian orchestras in Calgary, Hamilton, London, Ontario, Toronto, and Windsor, Ontario He also established an international reputation with an extensive repertoire of recordings of his own, specializing in music of the Baroque period.
Prof. SCHULTZ's musicianship and professionalism were noted by numerous colleagues, both in academia and in the performing arts. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster Keith HORNER, who worked on several recordings and radio programs with him, recalled his "bright, clear, ringing tone." Mr. HORNER praised Prof. SCHULTZ for his expertise with the piccolo trumpet, which he described as a very difficult instrument to master.
"It requires nerves of steel," he said. "With Erik, you didn't hear the work in it. He made it sound effortless -- and that was all smoke and mirrors, because it takes a great deal of physical effort."
Prof. SCHULTZ may have been known best for a series of albums he recorded with organist Jan OVERDUIN. The recordings were made in Kitchener, Ontario, and in Germany, and were issued both on vinyl and on compact disc. The two musicians first teamed up in Europe, where they were both touring in the mid-1980s, setting the stage for a collaboration that lasted until Prof. SCHULTZ's death.
In an interview from Waterloo, Ontario, Prof. OVERDUIN recalled his colleague as an enthusiastic participant in all kinds of musical events, both amateur and professional. "He would just transform the whole experience," Prof. OVERDUIN said. "There were times when I just stood in awe -- he'd be communicating with the audience on a level that was just beyond us."
Prof. OVERDUIN also cited his friend's commitment to musicianship, often displayed under rather trying circumstances. On one European tour, a delayed flight to Portugal saw them arrive in Lisbon with very little time to prepare for a concert. The difficulty was heightened by the fact that both musicians had gotten quite sick and had to find a doctor in Lisbon who could prescribe antibiotics.
And many performances in Europe, Prof. OVERDUIN said, were staged in old churches wherein the temperature or tuning of the organ posed their own special challenges. Since the organs couldn't be moved or modified, Prof. SCHULTZ would have to make adjustments to the pitch of his trumpet. Frequently this would require him to carry extra mouthpieces or lengths of tubing, but even that wasn't always enough.
"One day he had to get a hacksaw and physically saw out a piece of the trumpet," Prof. OVERDUIN recalled. "These were historic organs -- I would have a wonderful time, but it could be difficult too. [Sometimes] they would have weird historical temperaments, but he would adjust immediately."
Prof. SCHULTZ's commitment to music extended beyond his own career, however. In 1993, he and his father started IBS Recordings, a label for independent Canadian artists, eventually releasing more than three dozen titles. Flutist Fiona WILKINSON, one of Prof. SCHULTZ's colleagues at University of Western Ontario, recorded for the label as a member of the Aeolian Winds, and praised him for his generosity. Having established his own international recording career with the German label EBS, she said, he used IBS to support and nurture the initial careers of Canadian musicians. "He would interview and audition artists and take on projects that he felt deserved to be known."
"He positioned it as a discovery label," Mr. HORNER said. "He was ambitious -- he was looking for a recording studio so that he could have some control over sound quality."
Prof. WILKINSON also praised Prof. SCHULTZ for his collegiality. He raised the bar for the people he worked with, she said, acting as a role model for students and colleagues. "He had incredibly high standards. Everything he touched had to meet them."
But Prof. WILKINSON also remembered Prof. SCHULTZ for his sense of humour, and the real-world experience he brought to his teaching and academic work. "He knew what it was like to be 'out there,' " she said, "and he brought that back to the students."
Even with his illness, Prof. SCHULTZ never lost his enthusiasm for performing.
"He lost his voice, and couldn't talk on the phone, but he could still play," Prof. OVERDUIN recalled, noting that Prof. SCHULTZ still played at convocations last June. "It hurts me to think we'll never play again."
Erik SCHULTZ leaves his wife Kelly, his children Daniel, David and Nicole, and two sisters.
Erik SCHULTZ, musician and teacher; born in Hamilton, Ontario, August 29, 1952; died in London, Ontario, December 1, 2002.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
CHISHOLM, Thomas Huston
Died, after a short battle with cancer, at the Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre, Owen Sound, on Tuesday, December 23, 2003. Tom CHISHOLM of Southampton at the age of 37 years. Beloved son of Marjorie CHISHOLM (née HUSTON) of Southampton and the late Bruce CHISHOLM. Dear brother of Susan and her husband Greg SCHULTZ of Burlington. Proud uncle of Mackenzie and Huston. Tom will be sadly missed by his family and by his many Friends of the community. Cremation. No visitation. Private Family Services will be conducted through the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, (519) 797-2085. Tom's family wish to extend their extreme gratitude to those who cared for Tom with much love and compassion. Expressions of Remembrance to the Bruce County Museum and Archives, Southampton Ontario. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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SCHUPP o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU
In loving memory of Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU at the age of 78 years Thirty years of sobriety. Died peacefully surrounded by his wife and family at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday evening December 10, 2003.
Beloved husband of Clara (FOX) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong and first wife the late Tillie KUBUNT of Newberry, Michigan. Dear son of the late Dominic and Angeline (WASSEGIJIG) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong. Dear step-father to Bill TUCKER, Sharon (husband Ray) Wynn and Bob TUCKER of Newberry, Michigan, Lindell MATHEWS of Wikwemikong, Annie KAY (friend Eric EADIE,) Mathew and Linda MATHEWS (predeceased.) Loving grandfather to Billy, Karen, Jimmy, Linda (friend Wayne), Ronald (friend Tracy), Maxwell, Lindsay, Michael, Darla and a few more from Newberry, Michigan (names unknown at time of printing). Predeceased by two grandchildren Linda Marie and Lucy Marie. One great granddaughter Deanna MATHEWS. Loving brother of Stella (Jim predeceased) PAVLOT of Sault, Michigan, Ursula (Bob) SCHUPP of Meza, Arizona, Elsie (John predeceased) BOWES of Shorter, Alabama. Predeceased by brothers and sisters and in-laws Tony (Margaret) TRUDEAU, Isadore (Marge) WEMIGWANS, Lena (Bova) GRENIER, and Francis (Nestor) KARMINSKI. Will be sadly missed by Godchildren Jonathon DEBASSIGE, Alison RECOLLET, Darcy SPANISH, and many nieces, nephews and cousins.
Rested at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah. Funeral Mass was held at Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong on Monday, December 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Doug McCarthy s.j. officiating. Cremation at the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nations Crematorium. Lougheed Funeral Home.

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SCHWARTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
McINTYRE, Marion (Monie) Elizabeth Daly Bean
Died on February 28, 2003 at Kipling Acres Nursing Home after a long and devastating battle with Alzheimers. Monie was born in Toronto June 18, 1923, the only child of Roland and Marion Daly. She attended Bishop Strachan School in Toronto and the University of Toronto where she earned her B.A. and M.A. in sociology. She leaves behind her children who adored her: Diane (Dennis LALOR), Martha, Sarah (Peter LOCKWOOD) and Andrew (Lisa PEDWELL) as well as eight grandchildren: Alison and Matthew SCHWARTZ, Carolyn, Michael, Douglas and Hilary LOCKWOOD and John and Leslie BEAN. She was predeceased by her second husband, Dr. Alex McINTYRE, the love of her life. We will always be grateful to him for caring so much about her. Monie was beautiful and bright, creative and colourful, tolerant and self-indulgent - and she made every day more interesting for all of us. She loved gardening, travelling, bridge, golf and fishing. She was always keen to learn and experience new things and enjoyed a rich and fulfilling life. We want to thank Sharmane SPENCE for her wonderful compassionate, gentle and considerate care of Mom in her final years, and Sandy McINTYRE for his many kindnesses over many years. Funeral arrangements will be private. For those of you who remember her and loved her we know you will understand, in truth, she left us many years ago and we have been mourning her loss ever since.

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SCHWARTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Artist and portraitist refused to compromise
Works in his trademark use of colour hang in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital and in private collections
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
When the director of the University of Toronto's Hart House Gallery needed a portrait of Hart House warden Dr. Jean LENGELLÉ, she called artist Gerald SCOTT.
"In this case, Gerry was a perfect fit for Jean, because Jean wanted something that was not staid and traditional, which is certainly Gerry," said the director, Judi SCHWARTZ.
"He [Dr. LENGELLÉ] liked the patterning approach that Gerry took, and the two of them got along very well."
Mr. SCOTT painted the 1977 LENGELLÉ portrait and countless others in the manner of his friend and mentor, Group of Seven artist Fred VARLEY.
"Gerry placed colours together that you wouldn't think of, and when you stand back from the painting, you get the effect of the work, and when you get closer to it, you start to notice the colours," Ms. SCHWARTZ said of the LENGELLÉ portrait.
One of the foremost Canadian portrait painters, whose works hung in the inaugural exhibition of Toronto's prominent Greenwich Gallery along with those of Michael Snow, Graham Coughtry and William Ronald and are found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital and numerous private collections, Mr. SCOTT died of cancer at the age of 76. Along with Dr. LENGELLÉ, Mr. SCOTT's subjects included a Bermudan prime minister and a Baroness Rothschild. One of six children, whose father worked as a building engineer and car salesman, Gerald William SCOTT was born in Saint John. Although his birth certificate reads September 30, 1926, Mr. SCOTT always said it was wrong and he was born in 1925. To help support his family during the Depression, Mr. SCOTT danced on the city's docks, missing school to do so. After service in the Canadian army during the Second World War, he returned to Toronto where his family had settled.
There he met and married the Italian countess Josephine Maria INVIDIATTA. An English teacher who recognized her husband's gifts, she taught Mr. SCOTT to read. Thereafter, he read incessantly, devouring all types of material. Countess INVIDIATTA also encouraged Mr. SCOTT to attend the Ontario College of Art, now named the Ontario College of Art and Design.
Graduating from the college in 1949, Mr. SCOTT won the Reeves Award for all-round technical proficiency in drawing and painting. After a short career in advertising and turning down an opportunity to do a cover for Time magazine, he focused on fine art.
Mr. SCOTT taught at his alma mater part-time from 1952 to 1958 and full-time for a period beginning in 1963. And he participated in shows at both The Roberts Gallery and The Greenwich Gallery, later renamed The Isaacs Gallery.
While other artistic styles, such as abstract expressionism came and went, Mr. SCOTT continued with portraiture. "He didn't want to compromise his style," said his son Paul SCOTT. "He didn't follow trends."
Lacking the time to develop a body of work for a show, and with a self-effacing temperament which disliked the gallery scene, by the mid-eighties Mr. SCOTT no longer exhibited his work, sticking to commissions and teaching, and writing plays and poetry.
Teaching took up much of Mr. SCOTT's time, and he was known as a good one. For 25 years, he taught at the Three Schools of Art and later at the Forest Hill Art Club, both in Toronto.
"He was an inspirational teacher," said Michael GERRY, a student of Mr. SCOTT for six years and now an instructor at Central Technical High School in Toronto.
"He was one of the few people around who understands the vocabulary. He really knew his lessons. Not only was he skillful, he was thoughtful, unusually thoughtful. Colour and temperature were his specialty."
Said his friend and fellow artist Telford FENTON, "He had wonderful use of colour. It spoke to you."
A deliberate, patient and methodical instructor, popular with Rosedale matrons, Mr. SCOTT taught his students to observe colour. "He could see colour everywhere," said Joan CONOVER, who served as a portrait model for Mr. SCOTT. 'They're [the colours] there, Joanie,' he would say to me. 'All you have to do is stop looking. Close your eyes and then open them, very quickly. Close them, open them again, and you'll get a brief glimpse [of the colours].'"
Mr. SCOTT also demonstrated painting for his students. "Most teachers would not demonstrate," said another SCOTT student Roger BABCOCK. " His demonstrations were like a Polaroid picture. They would form before your eyes."
When students complained of lack of subjects, Mr. SCOTT told them how he stayed up nights painting works of his hand.
As he taught, Mr. SCOTT discussed the Bible, religion or politics. But he would not discuss his war experiences, according to Ms. CONOVER. "It made his stomach hurt," she said.
Mr. SCOTT used his right thumb for certain strokes, and was highly critical of his work, only signing it with persuasion.
Good Friends since the fifties with Mr. FENTON, the pair was known as the Laurel and Hardy of the art world.
Once, they sold the same painting to three different clients, eventually making good to all three. Another time while sailing, Mr. SCOTT's boat crashed into the dock of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Always charming Mr. SCOTT ended up in the club's bar, along with those of his party, treated to a round of drinks.
Mr. SCOTT continued working until he suffered a heart attack three years ago.
He died on July 13 and leaves his partner Joyce, two ex-wives, children Paul, Sarah, Hannah, Rebecca, Aaron, Amelia Jordan, Jarod and Dana, and five grandchildren. His first wife, Josephine, and a son, Simon, predeceased him.

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SCHWARTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Shock, sadness over ASPER
Former movie ticket taker rose to prominence as one of Canada's biggest media moguls
By Richard BLACKWELL Media Reporter Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B1
Canada's business, media and political elite expressed shock and sadness at the death of Izzy ASPER, the colourful Winnipeg media mogul who died yesterday at the age of 71.
Mr. ASPER built CanWest Global Communications Corp. into a national television and newspaper powerhouse, and more recently spent some of his fortune on charitable and philanthropic causes.
Israel ASPER, known to everyone as Izzy, was admitted to St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg at 9: 30 yesterday morning, and died soon after, surrounded by his wife and children.
CanWest spokesman Geoffrey ELLIOT/ELLIOTT said he had no information on the cause of Mr. ASPER's death, although it was "obviously sudden."
The funeral is set for tomorrow.
Mr. ASPER smoked heavily for years and had a serious heart attack at age 50.
A tax lawyer who for a time was leader of the Liberal Party in Manitoba, Mr. ASPER built CanWest Global from a single television station in Winnipeg into its current status as one of Canada's biggest media empires.
Colleagues and Friends praised him for his business successes and community work.
Conrad BLACK, who sold Mr. ASPER the Southam newspaper chain in 2000 to cement CanWest's position as Canada's leading media company, described him in an interview yesterday as "a charming informal character [with] never a hint of self-importance despite his great success." And that success was legendary, Lord BLACK said.
"The man started out taking tickets in a cinema in Minnedosa, and he, as of this morning, was the premier figure in the Canadian media. That's quite a career."
Lord BLACK noted that Mr. ASPER "had a reputation, in some circles, for being very litigious [but] I always found him a joy to deal with."
"We never had any difficultly reaching an agreement, and you never had to worry for an instant that the agreement would be followed up by him to the letter. "
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN issued a statement in which he called Mr. ASPER "a great personal friend and one of the finest and most able individuals I have ever had the privilege of knowing."
Ivan FECAN, president and chief executive officer of Bell Globemedia and Chief Executive Officer of CTV Inc., described Mr. ASPER as "a great entrepreneur, a brilliant competitor, and a true original."
Onex Corp. chief executive officer Gerald SCHWARTZ, who was a protégé of Mr. ASPER's and helped found the CanWest empire, said he "left a legacy of pride for his family, a television network for all Canadians, and a business empire for his colleagues. His leadership in the Canadian Jewish community is a loss that will not easily be overcome."
Mr. ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, who has worked with Mr. ASPER for the past four years, described him as "a visionary, but at the same time he was very human and very approachable."
Mr. ASPER's death raises questions about the future of CanWest Global, the conglomerate that owns Southam newspapers, the National Post, the Global television network, specialty television channels, and broadcasting operations in New Zealand, Australia and Ireland.
While Mr. ASPER was chairman of CanWest, he had given up the chief executive officer responsibilities to his son Leonard ASPER in 1999, and retired from day-to-day management responsibilities earlier this year.
His main preoccupations were two charitable foundations, the ASPER Foundation and the CanWest Global Foundation.
Still, Mr. ASPER was seen as the driving force behind the company's strategy, right up to the end.
Some people close to the company said yesterday that Mr. ASPER exercised so much strategic control, even in retirement, that the company could be plunged into turmoil. Operations could be restructured, and new partnerships and financings put in place.
CanWest's Mr. ELLIOT/ELLIOTT said a succession plan has been in effect for "quite some time," and there are unlikely to be any significant changes in the strategy of the company because of Mr. ASPER's death.
"There's a strong depth of long-term management at CanWest at the corporate level," he said.
The CanWest world
Canada
Publishing
-National Post
-CanWest Publications (Incl. 16 daily newspapers and 50 other publications)
Media Marketing and Sales
-CanWest Media Sales
-Integrated Business Solutions
Entertainment - Production and Distribution
-Fireworks Entertainment (film and television production)
Television Broadcasting
-Global Television Network (Incl. 11 television stations across Canada)
-independent stations (Incl. Hamilton, Montreal and Vancouver Island)
-Canadian Broadcasting Corporation affiliate stations (Incl. Kelowna and Red Deer)
-Specialty Television (Incl. Prime TV, Fox Sportsworld Canada, Mystery -45% Xtreme Sports, Men television - 49% Deja View, Lonestar)
Radio Broadcasting
-CJZZ FM Winnipeg
Production Services
-Apple Box Productions (commercial production)
-StudioPost Film Labs (post-production services)
-CanWest Studios (sound stage)
-WIC Mobile Production (live event mobile units)
New Media
-CanWest Interactive
-canada.com Interent Portal
-Financial Post Data Group
-Informart
International
Entertainment - Production and Distribution
-Fireworks Pictures (U.S., feature film distribution)
-Fireworks Television (U.S., television production)
-Fireworks International (Britain, International television distributor)
-CanWest Entertainment
International Distribution
(Republic of Ireland)
New Media
-Internet Broadcasting Systems (U.S. - 18%)
-LifeServ Corp. (U.S. - 25%)
Television Broadcasting
-Five stations in: New Zealand (2); Australia 57.5%; Northern Ireland 29.9%; Republic of Ireland 45%
Radio Broadcasting - New Zealand
-More FM (five stations)
-Channel Z (three stations)
-The Breeze (Wellington)
-4 National FM Networks
Out-of-Home Advertising - Australia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Vietnam
-Eye Corp. (100% owned by Network Ten)

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SCHWARZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Bureaucrat 'invaluable' to ministers
Analyst was a key negotiator in talks that led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 7, 2003 - Page F11
Gerry SHANNON could have been a professional hockey player like his father, but decided instead to play in a much bigger arena.
Mr. SHANNON went on to become a top career public servant who helped to formulate the federal government's policies on international trade. At one time, he held the No. 2 posting in the Canadian embassy in Washington and was a key negotiator in the talks known as the Uruguay Round, which led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995.
Mr. SHANNON, who died recently in Vancouver at the age of 67, is remembered as a fair, tough and passionate trade-policy analyst who was a trusted adviser to ministers in the successive cabinets of Pierre TRUDEAU and Brian MULRONEY in the 1980s.
"Gerry was a larger-than-life character," said Peter SUTHERLAND, a former director-general of the World Trade Organization. "He played a crucial role in the conclusion of the Uruguay Round. He had a belief in the multilateral system that he combined with an intense Canadian patriotism. His personality was also a factor in bringing peaceful resolution to difficult negotiations."
"He was a straightforward guy -- you always knew where you stood with him," said Marc Lalonde, a former Liberal finance minister. "He was a man with a very solid judgment. He was a good team player in that regard, the kind of guy you would want to have as a senior public servant."
Born in Ottawa in 1935, Mr. SHANNON received an early lesson from his father -- hockey player Jerry SHANNON, who played for the Montreal Canadiens, Boston Bruins and other National Hockey League teams -- on the necessity of appearing strong, no matter what. Once, after a puck knocked out the boy's two front teeth, his father shouted, "Get up, son, shake it off!" Young Gerry did so and stayed in the game.
The same spirit of toughness also probably helped him cope with the death of his mother when he was 10.
Despite an offer to try out for the Bruins, Mr. SHANNON took his father's advice and went to university. Graduating from Carleton University's school of journalism, he worked as a reporter for the Sudbury Star for several years before lifting his sights once again. He wrote a foreign-service exam and was accepted as a diplomat in 1963. "He realized that being a small-town reporter was great and he enjoyed it, but he wanted to be involved in the big world," said his wife, Anne Park SHANNON.
His first posting was in Washington, where, despite any formal training as an economist, he handled matters of trade and economic policy. "He was good at pursuing Canadian interests with the Americans. They liked him," Ms. Park SHANNON said. "He was very affable and very good at just getting to the essence of things."
He also served as Canada's senior foreign affairs representative in Belgrade in the former Yugoslavia, and as ambassador to Korea, one of Canada's youngest ambassadors at the time.
In the mid-1970s, at the height of the Trudeau era, he became director of commercial policy for the department of external affairs. After several years, he returned to Washington as the embassy's second-in-command at a time when Canada's national energy program generated heated discussions.
Recalled to Ottawa about 1982, he became the assistant deputy minister of finance for the Liberals, then deputy minister of international trade for the Progressive Conservatives. In these capacities, he advised Mr. LALONDE and Tory ministers Michael WILSON and Barbara McDOUGALL.
"He was a very professional public servant, he had a sense of professionalism, he had a very good mind, he was tough, and he understood very well the role of the senior public servant, " Ms. McDOUGALL said. "He never tried to be the minister and he was a straight shooter, which many of us appreciated when we realized that this was the exception and not the rule.
"I worked with a lot of great public servants, but he was certainly right up at the top," she said.
Anne Marie DOYLE, who worked extensively with Mr. SHANNON in various government departments, recalls that he would go out on a limb for employees when he thought that they were in the right, and he possessed "iron in his spine" that made his superiors respect him as steadfast and trustworthy.
"He had this phenomenal gift -- the ability to take a very complex problem, see to its core and express it in just two or three very articulate sentences so that someone like a minister or prime minister would have found him just invaluable," she said. "They would have his complex briefing and he would say, 'Well, Minister, what it boils down to is just this, ' and it would be just brilliant."
Mr. SHANNON was "one of the giants of Canadian trade policy of the '80s and '90s," said Bill DYMOND, executive director of the Centre for Trade Policy and Law at Carleton University. "The politicians trusted him because he was blunt, honest and loyal to the government."
Known for his enthusiasm and for being indefatigable on the job, Mr. SHANNON performed an astonishing array of official duties while in Geneva from 1989 to 1995. As Canada's chief negotiator for the Uruguay Round, he developed a binding dispute-settlement system that was hailed as a major breakthrough. He was Canada's first ambassador to the World Trade Organization as he had been to its predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
As an occasional ambassador to the United Nations, he gave to its committee on disarmament the " SHANNON mandate," a significant negotiating protocol still in use today.
Mr. SHANNON was known as a loyal defender of Canadian interests. Soon after leaving government in 1995 to work as an international trade policy consultant, he wrote an article for The Globe and Mail on Canada's seemingly never-ending softwood-lumber dispute with the United States.
"We always get roughed up in dealing alone with the Americans on issues they deem to be critical to them," he observed. "They simply have too many guns and they persevere until they win."
Mr. SHANNON enjoyed hiking, gardening, opera, travelling, dogs, crossword puzzles and playing hockey.
He and his wife moved from Ottawa to Victoria about a year ago with the intent of retiring there. He was sick only a few weeks before he died on April 26.
He leaves his wife, Anne Park SHANNON, and sons Michael and Steven from a previous marriage. He also leaves a sister, Carol SCHWARZ, of Ottawa.

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SCHWEITZER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-15 published
Stephen CSATARI
By Avery GUTHRIE, Susan CSATARI and Andrea CSATARI Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - Page A18
Son, brother, grand_son, avid reader, university student. Born September 14, 1981, in Mississauga. Died April 6, 2002, in Herstmonceux, Sussex, England, of a rare heart disorder, age 20.
The first thing most people noticed about Stephen was his height: 6 foot 8.
His rapid growth gave him a tendency to get tripped up by his own feet, often resulting in fairly spectacular falls and a constant awareness that door frames, light fixtures and, in one hilarious instance, a cowbell suspended from a beam, did not accommodate the free movement of someone of his stature.
His father, a manager at a computer consulting firm, and his mother, a nurse, were often told about Stephen's ability to absorb knowledge. His childhood babysitter clearly remembers him at age 5, happily reading the newspaper and telling her all about the day's big stories. Before he was 10 he'd gone through C. S. Lewis's Narnia chronicles and P. G. Wodehouse; he went on to history, biographies and novels by Michael Ondaatje, Stephen Fry and Kazuo Ishiguro.
His sister, Andrea, 22 months his junior, had little motivation to speak as a young child; she merely had to point and grunt, and Stephen would cheerfully communicate her desires to any adults at hand. A fine mimic -- Stephen did John CLEESE as Basil Fawlty he had an impeccable sense of comic timing. He also used his superior size to great advantage. He would sweep his girlfriend, Avery, off her feet and hold her upside-down (despite her protests). Grabbing Mum or Grandma for an unexpected polka around the kitchen was another favourite tactic of domestic disruption.
Stephen met Avery in Grade 7; they started dating in high school. At age 17, Stephen entered Queen's University to study history, a life-long passion he shared with his father.
He took courses in the Second World War, British, military, Russian and Chinese history, consistently placing at or near the top of his classes. His professors encouraged him to become an academic they told us his polite, understated way of sharing knowledge also won him much respect.
In 2002, Stephen and Avery went to study at Queen's International Study Centre at Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex, England, and enjoyed field trips to historical sites in Britain, France and Belgium (his fellow students nicknamed Stephen "tour guide" because of his store of knowledge).
On a sunny spring day in the last week of term, he went for a run along his favourite country lane, past hedgerows, an ancient church, and grazing sheep. The exertion triggered a severe rhythm disturbance of his heart, a rare hereditary problem of which he was unaware. Stephen collapsed. A local landowner, Rieke SCHWEITZER, grandnephew of Albert SCHWEITZER, found him and called the police.
Now that his family knows about what killed him -- arrythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia -- we are being closely monitored. In death, Stephen has been able to watch out for those he loved.
Stephen was intrigued by Churchill and Kennedy; he told Avery that they had accomplished more by age 20 than he, and worried that, if he were to die, no one would notice. Avery spoke of this at the funeral, which was attended by hundreds of Friends, family and teachers. They gave Stephen a standing ovation.
His potential will never be realized. But he is remembered for his intelligence and wit, for his generosity and loving nature. Mr. SCHWEITZER has placed a stone marker on the lane where Stephen fell.
Avery is Stephen's girlfriend, Susan and Andrea his mother and sister.

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SCHWEITZER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-12 published
SCHWEITZER, Michael Steven - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Michael Steven SCHWEITZER, late of the City of Toronto, who died on May 4, 2003, must be in our hands by January 16, 2004, after which date the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims then filed.
Dated at Toronto this 12th day of December, 2003.
Alan SCHWEITZER, Estate Trustee,
by his solicitors,
Sheldon Huxtable
Barristers and Solicitors
Suite 1801, 180 Dundas Street West
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z8
Attention: Bradley J.C. HUXTABLE
Page B10

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