SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
SMITH
-In loving memory of a dear grandfather and great grandfather, John Ross, who entered into rest on January 21, 1996.
Your cheerful smile, your heart of gold,
You were the best this world could hold, never selfish always kind.
These are the memories you left behind.
While you sleep a peaceful sleep,
Fond memories of you we always keep.
No verse, no flowers, no tears can say,
How much we miss you everyday.
With our endless love "poppa"
Stephanie, Beth-Ann, Bradley, Jason, Anthony, Kristin, Kevin, Erin, Alicia, Shawn, Kristia, great granddaughter Alexis.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
SMITH
-In loving memory of a dear father, Dad, John Ross, who passed away January 21, 1996.
A page in the book of memory,
Silently turns today,
At times it's almost like yesterday,
At other times an eternity.
Gone are the days we used to share,
But in our hearts you are always there
May the wind of love blow gently,
And whisper so you can hear.
We will always love you and miss you,
And wish that you were here.
But we know you walk beside us.
And when our lives are through.
We pray that God will take our hands
And lead us straight to you.
With all our love Dad, sleep in peace.
-Lovingly remembered by daughters Marilyn and Connie, sons Doug and Billy.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
SMITH
-In loving memory of a dear husband, John R., who passed away January 21, 1996.
We thought of you with love today,
We thought about you yesterday,
And days before that too.
We think of you in silence,
It hurts to say your name.
All we have left are memories,
And your picture in a frame.
When we are sad and lonely,
And everything goes wrong.
If we could only hear your voice again,
Then we would know to carry on.
Our memory is our keepsake,
With which we will never part
We cannot have you here with us
But we keep you in our heart.
-Lovingly remembered by loving wife, Wilhelmina.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
Maxine Verna HOFFMAN
In loving memory of Maxine Verna HOFFMAN who passed away peacefully at Wikwemikong Nursing Home on Saturday, April 26, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Beloved mother of Gary and Marie HOFFMAN of South Baymouth. Cherished grandmother of Paula HOFFMAN (Dan) and Larry (Suzanne) HOFFMAN. Loved great grandmother of Kyle and Rachel. Will be missed by brothers and sisters, Ivy and Hugh KELLY, both predeceased. Pearl and Dave McLEAN, both predeceased, Gordon (predeceased) and Margaret HEMBRUFF, Freda and Robert (predeceased) SANDERS of Scarborough, Ken and Elaine (predeceased) HEMBRUFF of Beaumondville, Willard and Barb HEMBRUFF of Minden, Welland and Elizabeth HEMBRUFF of Scarborough, Dorothy and Wayne (predeceased) SMITH of Queensville and Ron and Marie HEMBRUFF of Toronto. Dear aunt of many nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews.
A gathering of family and Friends for a grave side service will be held at 1: 00 p.m. Sunday, May 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. There will be no wake or funeral service. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
William "Bill" VILLEMERE
In loving memory of William Bill VILLEMERE who passed away Thursday, June 19th ,2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital - Memorial Site at the age of 85 years.
Beloved husband of Marion (Lucy) VILLEMERE of Sudbury. Loving father of Marilyn LOGAN (husband William SMITH) of Manitowaning, Robert "Bob" of Sudbury and Margaret LANTHIER (husband Wilfrid) of Tecumseh. Cherished grandfather of Joanne GABOR (husband George) of Windsor, Tammy LANTHIER of Toronto, Sharon WHYNOTT of Halifax, Peter WHYNOTT of Sudbury and great grandchildren Shawn, Matthew, Emily, Tayler and Sydney. Dear son of John and Cora May VILLEMERE both predeceased. Dear brother of John, Otto, George, Grace, Holden, Orval, Ian, Gerald, Dorothy and Edna, all predeceased. Funeral Service was held on Sunday, June 22, 2003 at the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Dorothy Jean SMITH
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Jean SMITH (née McLAUGHIN) age 67 of Saskatoon, which occurred on July 6, 2003. A private graveside service was held at Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon on July 11, conducted by the Rev. Henry COMERFORD with only family members in attendance in accordance with Dorothy's wishes. Arrangements were entrusted to Saskatoon Funeral Home.
Surviving are her loving husband Frederick, daughter Kim SMITH- CHAMBERLAIN (David) of Herefordshire, England, son of Terry of Martensville, Saskatchewan, sister Roberta McMULLEN (Doug) of Sudbury, brother Hugh McLAUGHLIN (Mollyanne) of Gore Bay, numerous nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Dorothy was predeceased by her father Wm. Burt McLAUGHLIN in 1956 and her mother Laura McLAUGHLIN in 1989. Dorothy was born in Manitowaning, on September 19th, 1935 where she grew up and completed her education at the Continuation School. She graduated from Ottawa Civic Hospital School of Nursing in 1957 and was a life member of the alumnae. She did private duty nursing in Ottawa and obstetrical nursing at the Sudbury General Hospital. She served in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Nursing Sister with the rank of Flying Officer. She married Fred SMITH on September 9, 1961 at St. George's Anglican Church, Saskatoon. Dorothy enjoyed the arts and entertainment and was a huge "movie buff." She loved gardening, music and nature and was employed in the family business until the business was sold in 2001. She was also gifted with a remarkable decorating flare which was demonstrated during all the festive seasons. Dorothy was always active in her family's lives, a devoted wife, mother and friend and will be very sadly missed by all.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
N. Peter SMITH
August 5, 1946 to October 19, 2003.
Pete went to join he heavenly Father on Sunday morning with his wife and best friend, Esther at his bedside in the Mindemoya Hospital. Pete had courageously fought a lengthy battle with prostate cancer. Pete was born in Toronto and grew up in London. He returned to Toronto to work, and begin his family, but often dreamed of leaving for a more rural lifestyle. During the years of living in the city, he spent his weekends and vacations with his Friends and family, building a cottage on the Pickerel River-Le Grou lake near Arnstein. He was eventually able to realize his dream of farming and he moved his family to Powassan. He later enjoyed living and working in Parry Sound. He was able to realize another dream of entrepreneurship when he opened his gift shop "The Pickle Jar" in Port Loring. Pete chose Manitoulin Island as his final earthly home, and felt he had almost found paradise at his home in Gore Bay overlooking the North Channel.
Pete loved the outdoors and always believed in being a good steward of the land, attempting to leave the environment in a better condition. His hobbies included golfing, hunting, fishing, all terrain vehicles, sledding, boating, and walking, as well as woodworking, collecting antiques and many more interests. He loved to socialize and enjoyed spending time in conversation with people.
Pete was the younger son of Allan and Margaret SMITH (predeceased) of Toronto. He will be missed by his brother David (Sylvia) of Oakville, his children, Brian of Huntsville, Scott (wife Valerie) of Oshawa, and Wendy (Chris) of Parry Sound. Step son Jamie (Cheryl) and granddaughter Rebecca TAILOR/TAYLOR of Guelph. Mother and father-in-law, Fred and Beulah RUSSELL of Tehkummah, sisters and brothers-in-law, Evelyn RUSSELL BAEHR of Kitchener, Barbara and Keith FLAHERTY of Southampton. Nieces and nephews, a great niece and great nephew, and many Friends.
Pete was active in the Mindemoya Missionary Church and will be missed by his church family.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Vernon Oscar ROBINSON
In loving memory of Vernon Oscar ROBINSON, June 7, 1927 to November 11, 2003, who
passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current. at the age of 76 years.
Vernon was a great advocate of self-government for First Nations, helping many reserves in Northern and Southern Ontario to accomplish this. He retired from the Department of Indian Affairs after 30 years. He then was a consultant for them the following 11 years. Vern had a great appreciation and love for the outdoors, his work and his church, ministering to others.
Born in Sheguiandah to Samuel and Edith (WILLIS) ROBINSON. Will be dearly missed by his loving wife Barbara and their children Loree of California, Richard of Pentanguishene, Elizabeth of Arizona, Laura and husband Arther SMITH of Tahiti, Christopher and wife Heather HORNING of Florida. Will be remembered by grandchildren Sahara, Alannah, Sebastian, Eric, Elizabeth, Erik, Emily, and Erin. Dear brother to Marjorie SHEPPARD (predeceased), Leighton and wife Irene, Jean and husband John BRADLEY, Shirley and husband Ed BOTTING, Erma and husband Jim BRADY, Calvon and wife Betty and Merlin (predeceased).
Visitation was held on Thursday, November 13, 2003 at the Island Funeral Home. Funeral service was held on Friday, November 14, 2003 at Community of Christ Church, Little Current, Ontario with Elder Humphrey BEAUDIN officiating. Cremation.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Jason Keith Alexander SMITH, March 28, 1976 to November 7, 2003. Began his journey home on November 7, 2003 where he will be met by his "Ma" Darlene SMITH, grandpa "Chubby" SMITH, his "Zhi Zhe" Ed Thompson (Zhish), Uncle Ronnie, Tanya, Eric as well as many other family and Friends.
Those of us to carry on his gifts and memory are his parents Kari and John AGUONIA, Richard PORTER, Peggy LOGAN. Proud brother of Boshk, Dawniss, Dawyne, Rick, Martina, Corrina, Bettina and Georgina. Loving nephew of Wanda (Nana), Scott (Lilianne), Cindy (Tony), Brock, Ves, Norman (Louise), Auntie Bea, Francis (Viola), Lawrence (Susan), Auntie George, Eddie, Brenda, Kenny, JoAnne, Jeanne, Carolyn, Jesse, ad Ronnie and special nephew to Eva Proter. Grandson to Arthur PORTER, Joyce PORTER, Dorise HENHAWK. Fondly remembered by his many "cuzsins", nieces, nephews and many, many Friends.
Wake: Ceremony and drumming at Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre on Monday November 10, 2003 and Tuesday November 11, 2003. Feast was held Tuesday, November 11, 2003. Second wake was held at "Ma" SMITH's. 1074 Sour Springs Road, Six Nations, Ontario on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 and Thursday, November 13, 2003. Burial was held Friday, November 14, 2003 at Saint Paul Anglican Church, sour Springs Road, Six Nations, Ontario. Feast followed at Six Nations Community Centre, Ohsweken, Ontario.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
SMITH--In loving memory of our dear grandmother, Lenore Sadie, who passed away November 19, 2002.
We think of you in silence
We often speak your name
We have our special memories
And your picture in a frame
Out hearts still ache with sadness
Our silent tears still flow
For what it meant to lose you, Grandma
No one will ever know.
--Sadly missed by Darren and Pauline, Jennifer, Dayna, Jamie and Tara, Kerri and Troy, Kristie, Deanna, Jeffrey, Dawson and Tyler.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
SMITH
-In memory of our dear mother, Lenore, who passed away November 19, 2002.
In a quiet graveyard
Not very far away
Lies a mother and a friend
We lost one year ago today.
We remember her smile
And her heart of gold
She was the dearest lady
The world could ever hold.
Her memory is a keepsake
For which we'll never part
God has you in his keeping
But we hold you in our heart.
-Remembered by Les and Diane, Blaine and Patricia, Bob and Anne, Gary and Brenda, Roberta and Lou.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
John Ellsworth SEABROOK
In loving memory of John Ellsworth SEABROOK July 18, 1923 to November 30, 2003.
John Ellsworth SEABROOK, known as "Jack" passed away suddenly at 80 years, on November 30, 2003.
He was born in Chatsworth, July 18, 1923 and made his home in Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, since 1931. He leaves to remember him, his beloved wife Marion. His cherished kids: Cathy, Deb, John, Diana, Mark and Vanda. Their spouses: David, Cheryl, Keith and Michelle. His treasured grandchildren: Brent, Brady, Logan, Meg, Kate, Sarah, Jenny, Ben, Philip, A.J., Josh, Lyric, Jasmine, Morgan and Jessie. His one beautiful great grandchild Teigan. His sisters: Ella (Peggy) HAHN and Lois CHALLINOR. Predeceased Maxine PRINGLE and Fern SEABROOK. His brother, Archie. Predeceased Bill. His sisters-in-law: Joanne
SMITH, Millie SEABROOK and Aletha SEABROOK. Predeceased Lorene STANLEY. His brothers-in-law: Jim HAHN, Jim SMITH and George STANLEY. Predeceased Hugh PRINGLE. His nieces and nephews: Clay, Susan, Bill, Beth, Robert, Paul, David, Charlie, John, Geoff, Mark, Kevin and Tara. Predeceased Lynn. All will miss him dearly. He was an original. He realized his own dreams of becoming a machinist, a master mechanic, a carpenter, the developer of the Brookwood Brae Golf Course, windmill designer, gentleman farmer (all animals at his farm died of old age) and curator and creator of Jack's Agriculture Museum. We all knew and loved him and he became our example to follow our dreams. His colourful, warm character shone at auctions, plays, card games, and church committees. He was the crank shaft and spark plug of our family. He loved Massey Harris tractors, Triumph motorcycles, Blue Jay games, yellow wooden shoes, novels by Louis L'Amour, movies with John Wayne, grape juice and certo (for arthritis), raisin pie and ice cream - and us!
"Everyday you're breathin' is a good day." This philosophy was reflected in his love for his wife, his kids, his grandkids, his Friends and his community. His love will shine in those he's left behind. Friends called the Mindemoya United Church on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, December 4, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Victoria PITAWANAKWAT (STONE)
In loving memory of Victoria PITAWANAKWAT, July 13, 1937 to December 6, 2003.
Victoria PITAWANAKWAT, a resident of Wikwemikong, passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current, on Saturday, December 6, 2003 at the age of 66 years.
She was born in Little Current, daughter of the late George and Seraphine SPANISH) PITAWANAKWAT. Victoria was a postal worker for 29 years. She enjoyed puzzles and collected spoons while traveling and was especially fond of cows. She will be sadly missed by her family and all who knew her. Surviving are common-law husband Jarvis McCUMBER, sons George (Richard) STONE, friend Henrietta, John STONE, friend Pearl of M'Chigeeng and Jeffrey STONE, friend Margaret Anne. Proud grandmother of Johnny STONE, Kristy STONE, Timmy STONE, Tito SMITH, Jeremy SMITH, Tara STONE and Sara STONE and great grandchildren Katie Summer Seraphine STONE and Erica STONE. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Mary LISCUMB (Harry,) Mabel CORBIERE (Paul) and Archie PITAWANAKWAT.
Friends called at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah on Monday and Tuesday evening.
The funeral mass was held at Holy Cross Mission on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 with Fr. Dougals McCarthy as celebrant. Cremation to follow.

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SMITH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE
In loving memory Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE, September 30, 1941 to December 15, 2003.
Mandy BELLEROSE, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, December 15, 2003 at the age of 62 years.
She was born in Carnarvon Township, daughter of the late Albert and Anne (McFARLANE) DAVIS. Mandy had worked with the developmentally handicapped for over 15 years. She enjoyed bingo, going to the casinos, crosswords and knitting. Her greatest love and the most pleasure she had in her life was her family. Although she will be sadly missed, many fond memories will be cherished by her entire family and Friends.
Dearly loved wife of Donald BELLEROSE, loving and loved mother of Kelly SMITH and his wife Marie of Hensall, Debbie WHITE/WHYTE and her husband David of Brampton and Ray SMITH of Providence Bay and step-children Dawn of Sault Ste. Marie, Michael and his wife Terry of Sudbury and Darrin and partner Shawna of Sault Ste Marie. Proud grandmother of Kasaundra, Tiffany, Kristi, Melissa and Bryan. Dear sister of John DAVIS, and his wife Cindy of Spring Bay. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews, and many cousins and Friends. Predeceased by infant daughter Mary Ann HEBERT and brother Joseph Morlyn DAVIS.
Friends may call at the Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya after 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Thursday, December 18, at 3: 00 p.m. with Father Robert Foliot officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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SMITH o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2003-11-14 published
FROST, Clayton " Nifty" John
Slipped away quietly on Friday, October 31st, 2003, Clayton (Nifty) John FROST of Peterborough, Ontario at 94 years of age. Sadly missed by Daughter Diane and husband Robert QUILLMAN of Wasaga Beach, son Don FROST and wife Vikky of Lakefield; Daughter Cathy FROST and companion Lane SMITH of Ajax and Granddaughter Catherine ALLAN and husband Brad and 3 great grand_sons, Lucus, Derek and Mackenzie ALLAN all of Barrie.
"Today Nifty walks the streets of Heaven"
Page 18

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-03 published
Man faces gun charge in stepson's death
By Graeme SMITH Friday, January 3, 2003, Page A3
A mother's grief was mixed with anger yesterday when her partner remained in jail on a weapons charge in the fatal shooting of her son on a hunting trip.
"I don't think it's fair at all," the tearful 30-year-old, who asked not to be named, said in a telephone interview from her home near Hagersville, Ontario
This is the second time she has mourned the death of a child over the holidays: Her younger son, Elijah JADE, died in a car crash on Christmas Eve two years ago.
Her older son, 10-year-old Aaron James MARTIN, went hunting for his first deer in Southwold Township, south of London, Ontario, on New Year's Day with his 31-year-old stepfather, Fabian ELIJAH, and Mr. ELIJAH's 12-year-old nephew.
Shortly after 1 p.m., police say, Mr. ELIJAH was crossing a creek in a ravine when he slipped and fell. The jolt set off his .22-calibre rifle, and a bullet hit Aaron in the head.
Mr. ELIJAH and his nephew ran in opposite directions, out of the woodlot and across corn fields, searching for help. Mr. ELIJAH found a farmhouse and emergency services were called.
Rescuers at first had trouble finding the boy, Ontario Provincial Police spokesman Dennis HARWOOD said: "It was difficult because of the terrain."
Emergency crews borrowed four-wheel-drive pickup trucks and tore across the rolling fields, but the distraught hunters had trouble retracing their steps.
"They were trying their best," Mr. HARWOOD said. "But they were disoriented."
An air ambulance eventually spotted the boy from above, Mr. HARWOOD said. The helicopter took him to the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario in London, where he was pronounced dead.
A police investigation later revealed that a 1993 court order had forbidden Mr. ELIJAH to own guns. He appeared in a Saint Thomas, Ontario, courtroom yesterday, was charged with illegal possession of a firearm and was denied bail.
Investigators are still examining the accident, Mr. HARWOOD said, though foul play is not suspected.
The boy's mother said Mr. ELIJAH, her partner for about three years, was an experienced hunter. She hadn't known about the 1993 court order, she said.
She has four surviving children, all girls.
Aaron had enjoyed playing on a local lacrosse team until his brother's death, she said. "He's just been trying to heal from that."
The boy was still learning to hunt, having tried it only a few times before. He was also learning to speak the Mohawk language of his ancestors.
"He was a high-spirited young boy," his mother said. "He had lots of Friends. He was always helping people with things, you know. I want the world to know how beautiful my sons were," she said. "I want everybody to remember his kind and gentle heart. He's with the Creator now, with his brother."

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-08 published
Photographer, reporter and royal press attaché
After years at The Globe and Mail, he went on to craft speeches for William DAVIS and to co-ordinate royal tours
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, January 8, 2003, Page R5
John GILLIES, a former reporter at The Globe and Mail, who later served as press attaché for the royal tours in the 1970s, died recently at his home in Mississauga, Ontario He was 74.
Known as "a two-way man," Mr. GILLIES was both a reporter and photographer at The Globe throughout the 1960s. He travelled extensively around Ontario, covering everything from fires and train derailments to inquests and trials.
Reporting was in his blood, said Rudy PLATIEL, a fellow two-way man who worked with Mr. GILLIES at The Globe.
He loved digging up stories and talking to people, Mr. PLATIEL recalled.
"For John, the worst time was when nothing was panning out, and he didn't get a story.
"We were sort of the generalists in the sense that we were ready to take on any story," Mr. PLATIEL added. "I think he enjoyed not knowing what was coming up next."
After more than a decade at The Globe and Mail, Mr. GILLIES left the paper for a job with the Ontario government.
Working as a communications officer in the Ministry of Education, his job, among others, was to field media calls and write speeches.
He frequently wrote them for William DAVIS -- who would later become the Premier of Ontario -- when Mr. DAVIS was the education minister. Mr. GILLIES spent 20 years working for the government before retiring in the late 1980s.
Of all the press officers at Queen's Park at the time, Mr. GILLIES was the most up-front, said Rod GOODMAN, a former ombudsman of The Toronto Star.
"If he knew something, he would tell you," Mr. GOODMAN said. "He was very straight and very honest."
During the 1970s, on leaves from the Ministry of Education, Mr. GILLIES served as press co-ordinator for the royal tours to Canada.
He would ride on the press bus, following the Royal Family on their visits to various parts of the country, arranging interviews and ensuring that things ran smoothly for the press.
"Several times, he got to meet the Queen," said his daughter, Laurie SWINTON. "He always said Prince Philip was a real card."
Her father was not known for his impeccable style: Ms. SWINTON recalls a photo taken of him standing with the Queen, wearing a rumpled $29 suit from a local department store. It was not uncommon for Mr. GILLIES to be seen with a crooked tie and untucked shirt. "He was probably one of the only guys at Queen's Park that dressed worse than me," said author and broadcaster Claire HOY.
John GILLIES was born in Toronto on March 4, 1928, the only son of George and Sarah GILLIES. The family lived in a tiny row house in the city's west end. His father worked in the rail yards, and his mother in a chocolate factory, often bringing home boxes of candy for her only son.
Not fond of school, Mr. GILLIES dropped out in Grade 10.
Later, in search of work, he walked into the office of the weekly newspaper in Port Credit (now a part of Mississauga), telling them he needed a job and would do anything. It just so happened that they required a sports editor and hired him.
"He just sort of fell into writing," Ms. SWINTON said.
In 1954, when Hurricane Hazel ripped through Toronto, killing 81 people, Mr. GILLIES's instinct was not to seek shelter in the basement of his home, but to hit the streets to talk to people and gather stories.
When Mr. GILLIES reached an area of the city where a number of new townhouses had been wiped out, a police roadblock met him, recalled his son, Ken GILLIES. A friend who was with him at the time pulled a badge from his coat pocket and flashed it at the officer. After police let the pair through, Mr. GILLIES turned to his friend and asked where he got the badge. "From my kid's Cheerios box this morning," his friend replied.
An avid golfer, it was on the greens in Port Credit that Mr. GILLIES met Frances SMITH, a woman who shared his passion for golf.
The couple married in 1954, and later had three children. Ms. GILLIES died of cancer in 1984.
A helpless optimist when it came to golf, Mr. GILLIES was known to go out under the most dire conditions. He would look at a dark, looming sky and declare that it was clearing, Ken GILLIES recalled. By contrast, said Mr. HOY, the task of getting Mr. GILLIES on the greens when he hadn't scheduled a golf game was next to impossible.
"I don't know anyone else who was that structured," Mr. HOY added, noting that his golfing buddy stuck to his weekly schedule, where each day was dedicated to a particular task. For example, shopping was done not on Thursday but on Saturday. "He had this one little idiosyncrasy," Mr. HOY joked.
A good-hearted man who was also a big lover of dogs, Mr. GILLIES was known to carry a stash of dog biscuits on his daily walks to give to the neighbourhood pooches. "He was a very simple guy," said his son Ken. "He didn't like a lot of ceremony and fanfare."
Mr. GILLIES leaves his three children, Don, Ken and Laurie, and two grandchildren, Corey and Grace.
John GILLIES, reporter / photographer, communications officer born in Toronto on March 4, 1928; died in Mississauga, Ontario on December 4, 2002.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
Bill WELLWOOD was racing hall of famer
By Beverley SMITH Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page S12
Bill WELLWOOD, an icon in the North American harness racing world, died yesterday at the Trillium Health Centre in Mississauga, Ontario He was 62. WELLWOOD was a member of the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame and was chosen horseman of the year in Canada in 1974 and 1992. He was known as an astute horseman who had a gift for picking out yearlings and turning them into top racehorses. These included two-time Breeders Crown winner Village Jiffy, Village Connection, Village Jasper, and 1997 Metro Pace winner Rustler Hanover. WELLWOOD is survived by wife Jean and daughter, Paula, also a horse trainer. His funeral will be held tomorrow in Cambridge, Ontario

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
SMITH, Margaret Blakely (née BURNS)
Died peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, Grace Division, of cancer, on February 16, 2003. Daughter of Charles BURNS and Sara Margaret BLAKELY. Sister of Katharine Steele (BURNS, YOUNG) PICKEN. Beloved wife of James Edwin (Ted) SMITH and a wonderful mother to Katharine Blakely SMITH and James Charles SMITH (Cheryl.) Grandmother of Althea ALISON and Michelle Meagan SMITH, and ''Grandma'' to Robin MILLER and Ciera and Ryan GAUTREAU. Born in Ottawa, she was a graduate of Glebe Collegiate and Queen's University where she was a member of the Senior Ladies hockey and basketball teams. For five years she enjoyed teaching high school in Manotick until her marriage to Ted in 1948. The family moved from Ottawa to Toronto in 1963. A memorial service will be held at the Trinity Presbyterian Church, 2737 Bayview Avenue (south of Hwy. 401), on Saturday, February 22, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment of cremated remains will be held in Norway Bay, Quebec. If you wish, in lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Trinity Memorial Fund, 2737 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M2L 1C5.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
CAIN, Thomas Henry
At St. Joseph's Villa, Dundas, 18 February 2003, of cancer. Professor of English literature at McMaster University for 31 years, Tom had a keen interest in teaching undergraduates to write lucid prose, and was author of Common Sense About Writing (1967). The methods in this manual were conceived and developed while an instructor at Yale University, and arise from the rigors of the old Ontario school curriculum of which he was a beneficiary. Author of Praise in The Fairie Queene (1978), and numerous related articles, he began his scholarly interest in Edmund Spenser while an undergraduate at Victoria College, University of Toronto his graduate degrees were from the Universities of Toronto and Wisconsin. He was a regular church organist from his boyhood, until in 1967 he joined the choir of St. James' Anglican Church in Dundas under the direction of Richard BIRNEY- SMITH, in whose Te Deum Singers he also sang from 1972 until his health began to fail in 1997. In 1976 he joined Saint John's Anglican Church in Ancaster, where he sang in the choir for 22 years, and enjoyed a central role in designing its organ in 1988. His hymn text, 'Eternal Lord of Love, Behold Your Church, ' written for the Episcopal Church's Hymnal (1982), is included in Roman Catholic and Lutheran hymnals, and the 1998 hymnal in present use in the Anglican Church of Canada. A gardener of great knowledge and experience, he shared this interest information and particularly plants generously. Throughout his life, he enjoyed deep Friendships with animals. He found a great store of patience and humour to confront the illness which ended his life. He is survived by his widow, Emily CAIN, of Jerseyville; his son, Patrick CAIN, of Toronto, and his sister, Catherine MacFARLANE, of Maple, who wish to thank McMaster University Medical Centre and St. Joseph's Villa staff for their care and compassion. Requiem Eucharist at Saint John's Anglican Church, 272 Wilson St. (at Halson St.), in Ancaster, on Saturday, March 1 at 10: 30 a.m. (casual clothes) reception to follow in Saint John's parish hall (on Halson St.). Spring bulb flowers will be gratefully accepted at the church or parish hall. Please send donations in lieu of flowers to St. John's Church (music programme), 272 Wilson Street, Ancaster, Ontario L9G 2B9.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Jack McCLURE
By Carol BERNEY Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page A22
Painter, tennis player, friend, Perth County Conspirator. Born July 26, 1936, in Troy, New York Died February 13 in Stratford, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 66.
Jack McCLURE never made much money. He lived a simple life, say his Friends, who describe him as a "secular monk." After serving in the U.S. Coast Guard in Miami in the early 60s, Jack attended the University of Miami, played tennis, and hung out at The Flick coffee house, where he met actor/musician Cedric SMITH. In the late sixties Jack accompanied Cedric to Canada, and ended up working in the kitchen of the Black Swan coffee house in Stratford and living at "Puddlewalk, " the communal farm home of the Perth County Conspiracy, a swirling, ever-changing family of draft dodgers, artists, actors, musicians, and local hippies.
Jack was a passionate scholar and creative thinker. Obsessed with Marshall McLUHAN, Jack thought he saw a flaw in McLUHAN's theory, and actually went to Toronto to meet McLUHAN. Unfortunately, McLUHAN brushed him off and Jack came home crushed. For a short while, Jack lived at the (in)famous Rochdale College in Toronto. Jack said he lived on the 14th floor, and would look down and see cop cars converging on the building, but the residents had rigged the elevators to run so slowly that there was always plenty of time to clean up before the police arrived, and people rarely got busted. The other people on his floor were very nice, serious artists and intellectuals, but there were some wilder characters on some of the lower floors, and riding the elevator could be quite an adventure.
Back in Stratford, Jack lived in a caboose on a friend's farm for awhile, and then moved into town to share an apartment with another friend, Harry FINLAY. Jack then worked at the Gentle Rain natural foods store for, essentially, the rest of his life. He also sold paintings to his Friends, and gave tennis lessons. Among his patrons and students was musician Loreena McKENNITT, who said Jack was a very good teacher. His paintings were mostly in a realistically impressionist style, with tiny touches of absurdity and/or social protest. He would add a discarded Coke can to an otherwise idyllic river scene, or paint a nuclear-waste hazard sign on the side of a railroad car or at the back of a cave. One of his paintings was a portrait of Albert Einstein, while another, titled Church of the Muses, depicted Einstein playing the violin, with James Joyce playing piano and Bertrand Russell reciting.
In the last few years, Jack became close Friends with Michelle DENNIS, a co-worker at the Gentle Rain. On the back of a painting Jack gave to Michelle's family he called her two young daughters his "surrogate grandchildren."
This past summer, Jack was diagnosed with lung cancer. He underwent chemotherapy and radiation therapy and was in remission when he suffered a fatal heart attack during a badminton game. Jack left instructions to be cremated, with no service. However, as his long-term friend and employer Eric EBERHART remarked, that didn't mean we couldn't have a party. So the Sunday after Jack's death, many of his Friends and co-workers gathered at his house. We brought food, drink, photographs, and his paintings, and we had an impromptu showing of Jack's work to pay homage to his life and his spirit. His paintings are being archived, and in the spring there may be a showing at one of the Stratford galleries.
In Jack's room, on his work bench, was a quotation from Einstein: "The years of anxious searching in the dark, the intense longing, the alternations of confidence and exhaustion and then -- the final emergence into the light -- only someone who has so struggled and endured could understand." This describes the Jack we knew and loved.
Carol BERNEY is a friend of Jack McCLURE.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
BROWN, Ruth Elizabeth (née TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Tillsonburg
Suddenly on March 6, 2003. Beloved wife of Grant C. (Bud) BROWN, Q.C. for 61 years. Loving mother of Lyn SMITH (David,) Craig BROWN (Jane,) Kathy GIRVIN (David) and Timothy BROWN (Kathé.) Dear grandmother of Sara SMITH (Brian DYCK) and Cullen SMITH (Deceased); Will, Anna and Julian BROWN; Scott and Martha GIRVIN Lyn BROWN. Great-grandmother of Jacob and Liam DYCK. She will also be greatly missed by her sisters Kay WARREN and Jean HUNT and her brother, Campbell TAILOR/TAYLOR (Ruby) of Galt. The family will receive Friends and relatives at The Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg, on Sunday, from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm. Funeral service will be conducted on Monday at 2 pm. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 48 Brock Street, West, Tillsonburg. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. If you wish, donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Foundation would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
CLOSE, Mary Mills Donald
Died peacefully, in her 95th year, in Markham, Ontario, on Sunday, March 23rd, 2003, the beloved wife of the late Edward Robinson CLOSE. She is greatly missed by her son Allan and his wife Sandra, her son Donald and his wife Clare, and daughter Johanna and her husband Bert SPENCER. She is survived and missed by her adoring grandchildren Erin and Grant SPENCER, Alexandrina CLOSE and her husband Ravo LAINEVOOL, Andrew CLOSE and his companion Kristina SMITH, Sarah WRIGHT, Nathalie GLEESON, Paula HUDSON; and her sister Alexandrina (Mrs. P. B. F. SMITH) of Halifax. Mary was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Alexander DONALD of Hamilton and Burlington, sister of the late Mrs. W. E. BOAKE (Ivadell,) the late Mrs. Paul FARREN (Jane,) and the late George E. DONALD. A family service will be conducted at the graveside, Woodland Cemetery, Hamilton, Ontario on March 28th, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
Lumber king of the Ottawa Valley
For 75 years, he dominated logging in the region and provided all the wood for Inco mineshafts
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER never let his age stand in the way of a day's work. In 1928, at age 12, he was working full-time for his father's logging company in the Ottawa Valley near Pembroke, Ontario, and by 14 was running his own operation.
On a cold February morning 73 years later, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, who was known as Hec Sr., drove 150 kilometres to his family's lumber camp near Mattawa. He toured the site and chatted with his sons and two of his grandchildren who run the family owned business, before driving home in his pickup truck, accompanied by his spaniel. Three days later, on February 9, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER suffered a heart attack and died at his Pembroke home. He was 87.
"To the day he died, he was an integral part of the company, said his son Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER Jr.
During his 75-year association with the logging business, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER operated lumber operations in the Ottawa Valley and as far north as Sturgeon Falls and Blind River, Ontario For a time, Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER and Sons was one of the largest local employers.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER also built the Northwood Hotel near Pembroke and owned Northwood Stables, which bred, trained and raced pacers and trotters. At one point, he had 150 horses.
Born in Petawawa in February 1, 1916, his beginnings as an Ottawa Valley success story began in the early 1920s when a shortage of money in his family forced him to leave elementary school to work at his father Thomas's lumbering operation. Within two years, he bought a horse and started his own business, delivering logs to the Pembroke Splint Lumber Co.
In his first year in business, the red and white pines felled by Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's company produced 400,000 board feet of lumber, double his father's production.
"He said his father's operation was nice and neat and tidy but that it wasn't making enough money, " said Hector Jr., who is a former Member of Parliament for the riding of Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke and is now an adviser to Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN.
In the 1930s and 40s, the diminutive Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER expanded the business and modernized his equipment. His operation prospered during the Second World War. In 1945, he married Molly SMITH, a nurse from the Ottawa Valley community of Pakenham. The couple raised 10 children on their 375-acre farm located between Pembroke and Petawawa.
His company continued to operate in Renfrew County until about 1950 when he moved north to the Sturgeon Falls area to launch a new operation that employed 160 workers and cut enough trees to yield 10 million board feet of lumber a year. Later, he opened a second near Elliot Lake, Ontario, employing an additional 140 employees and producing another 10 million board feet of lumber annually. For many years, his company provided all of the pine for the shafts at the Inco mines in Sudbury. Eventually, the company diversified into pulpwood and, in the 1980s, provided kits for building log homes.
In 1960, the family returned to Pembroke so that the children would have easier access to schools. Sadly, 11 years later, Molly CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER died, leaving her husband to raise their children. He never remarried.
"We used to tease him about that and he'd say: 'Are you crazy? I couldn't find a woman crazy enough to look after you kids, ' " Hector Jr. said.
During his years in the logging industry, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER saw horses, broad axes and crosscut saws replaced by trucks, power saws, skidders and tree fellers that could cut and delimb trees in a matter of minutes. Over time, technology reduced crews from 200 to 30.
"The mechanization saddened him because he always felt the bush was kept cleaner with horses, and he felt good about employing so many people, " Hector Jr. said.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER Sr., a skilled log driver, was known as an innovator. Among his inventions was a device he nicknamed the "submarine." Using a winch, a generator and a floating wooden platform, it replaced dynamite as a way of breaking up logjams that blocked rivers. The submarine was soon adopted by competitors after premature detonations had killed log drivers.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER also had a passion for horses that stemmed from a love for the hard-working animals that for years had pulled his logs out of the bush.
He bought his first horse in 1951 for $100 and raced it at the Perth Fair where he got into an accident and broke his arm. He began breeding horses in 1955 and at one point had more than 150 racehorses. Among his most noted pacers was Barney Diplomat, which raced successfully for trainer Keith WAPLES in the mid 1950s and JJ's Metro, which won purses totalling $350,000.
His Northwood Stables and the Northwood Hotel were located across from each other on what is now County Road 17 west of Pembroke. His daughter Sandra and Hector Jr. drove horses for their father's stable.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was a past president of the Quebec Harness Horseman's Association, was one of the longest serving directors of the Canadian Standardbred Horse Society and helped found the Ontario Harness Horse Association, which in 1961 began representing the interests of horse owners, drivers, trainers, grooms and their families on matters such as track conditions, pension plans, disability insurance and purses.
"Hec Sr. was one of the founding fathers of organized horsemen in Ontario who helped negotiate purses so that people could have a career in horse racing, said Jim WHELAN, president of the Ontario Harness Horse Association in Mississauga. "He was a pioneer.
A strong secondary interest after racing was fishing. When he was not working, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER often disappeared to fish favourite lakes with a favourite dog.
Mr. HIGGINSON, who knew Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER for 35 years, said his friend had a soft spot for children who loved sports but couldn't afford the equipment.
"If a kid needed new skates, all of a sudden there would be a pair of skates for that child and nobody ever said where they came from. That side of him developed from what went on in his own family that was not well off at the start. Hec knew what it meant to be scratching out an existence -- he was interested in what was going on around him."
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was predeceased by his wife, four sisters and seven brothers. He leaves five sons and five daughters. Sons Tom, Willy and Jimmy, plus grandchildren Clyde and Shannon, run the family logging company.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
WRIGHT, W. J. Chaplin ''Bud''
Died of heart failure in Naples, Florida on March 25th, 2003, in his 81st year. He was the son of Alma CHAPLIN and Edward E. H. WRIGHT of St. Catharines. He was born and raised in St. Catharines, with summers spent at their cottage in Niagara-on-the-Lake. He attended Ridley College and graduated in Chemical Engineering from U. of T. Bud served with the submarine chasers, the corvette arm of the navy in World War 2.
As a chemical engineer, he worked for Stelco, Dupont and Galtex. Then he worked for over 25 years with Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor, a career that became his real love.
He was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by his wife of 53 years, Jane MURRAY, their four children: son Ken and wife Jill; three daughters, Marsha and Don SADOWAY, Ellen and Paul EDWARDS, and Leah Ann; by his sister Briar SMITH, wife of the late Larry SMITH, as well as three young grandchildren, Sam, Nathan and Caaryn. Bud is predeceased by his sister, Mary Elizabeth HUME.
Next to his family was his love for a good competitive game of squash, tennis and bridge. Many happy family holidays were spent at the cottage in Southampton, and that is where his final resting place will be.
Bud led his family by example with uncompromising integrity, loyalty, humour, a zest for life, and love.
Cremation took place in Naples. A Memorial Service will be announced at a later date, to be held at Saint Mark's Church, Niagara-on-the-lake. Donations to Historic Saint Mark's Anglican Church (est. 1792) Niagara-on-the-Lake or Arthritis Society.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
Elsie May DUTTON
By Wendy DUTTON Tuesday, April 1, 2003 - Page A20
Mother, grandmother, nurse, volunteer. Born May 23, 1915, in Rosedale, Alberta. Died January 29, in Toronto, following a stroke, aged 87.
Born and raised on the prairies, Elsie (née SMITH) loved Ontario's lakes and trees -- so much so that she once stopped a road crew from cutting down some beautiful maples near her Peterborough, Ontario, home. She always believed in taking action when she thought it was necessary.
She graduated as a registered nurse from Vancouver General Hospital in 1937. When the Second World War broke out, Elsie volunteered to join the South Africa Military Nursing Service; for added adventure, she flew from Calgary to New York aboard on one of the earliest flights of the just-created Trans-Canada Airlines. A year later she returned to Canada and transferred to the Canadian Army Nursing Service.
There she met a handsome soldier, Jim DUTTON. He courted her until she shipped overseas again. He kept up the courtship by mail, proposed in a letter, and was accepted by letter.
Elsie served in England, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. In the hospitals there they called her "the Lady with the Lance" as she administered a new drug, penicillin, to the wounded.
She returned to Canada in July, 1945, to marry Jim at Camp Petawawa's military chapel. After he finished his army career and Queen's University course in personnel work, they settled in Peterborough, built a house, and raised two daughters, Wendy and Pam.
Elsie worked as a school nurse in a number of small rural schools, which meant she did lots of tough driving on back roads. When schools closed for the summer, she worked as a nurse in summer camps on Lake Couchiching, which enabled us, her daughters, to spend summers by the water. On our father's holidays there were family camping treks. We travelled coast to coast, despite Elsie's initial reluctance to be "under canvas" again after the war.
Then Jim took a job in Port Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia. The Cape Breton town had no hospital, so Elsie got involved forming a hospital auxiliary, and became president. The auxiliary not only lobbied for a new hospital, they opened a physiotherapy centre this led to Elsie' work with the Arthritis Society.
The hospital auxiliary also held the region's first Well Woman clinics (offering advance screening for cancer and other diseases). On their first day, to the astonishment of the visiting doctor, women from all over Cape Breton lined up for hours before the clinic opened.
Eventually Jim and Elsie moved back to Peterborough, where Elsie kept working with the Arthritis Society, and volunteered at the Historical Society's Hutchinson House (a stone house built by a doctor in the 1830s), United Way, Alzheimer's Society and Kiwanis events. She was honoured by both the city of Peterborough and the Arthritis Society of Nova Scotia and Ontario.
Elsie also loved good times: dancing with Jim, travel, curling, crafts, auctions, theatre. Jim even convinced her to watch Blue Jay games with him.
Then Jim suffered a series of strokes. When Elsie was diagnosed with uterine cancer, she said she "didn't have time to be sick, " because Jim needed her. He died in April, 1995, after almost 50 years of marriage.
When her physical condition deteriorated because of arthritis, Elsie moved from her home to the Veteran's Wing of Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto, where she always took great joy and comfort in visits from her grandchildren, Laura and Alex.
Wendy is Elsie's daughter.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
An active life of kindness and empathy
The wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator always reached out to others
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, April 2, 2003 - Page R7
In Florence DOYLE, Friends and family saw someone who throughout her life actively lived her Catholic faith and embodied the qualities of kindness and compassion.
"My mom was always very concerned about the people in her immediate reach," said her daughter Judith DOYLE. " Her sense of empathy and concern for others guided her. People felt safe near her."
Whether it was chauffeuring her family around or taking an elderly neighbour on an outing to the horse races, Mrs. DOYLE, wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator Richard (Dic) DOYLE, was always conscious of others. Mrs. DOYLE died on March 20 in a Toronto hospital after suffering a stroke. She was 78.
Known as Flo to family and Friends, Mrs. DOYLE also earned the affectionate nickname of "Sarge" from her family for her knack of keeping watch over their schedules and well-being. At one point, she was the only family member with a driver's licence and would faithfully drive her husband to work and their children to various places. She also kept track of the family's money matters and would ensure at tax season that everyone filed on time. Later, she nursed her husband through a bout with throat cancer and with diabetes.
"Her family was the centrepiece of her life," said Colin McCULLOUGH, a former Globe reporter and newspaper publisher.
Sharing in her husband's professional life, Mrs. DOYLE travelled with him, attended functions and opened their home to Friends and colleagues. "I didn't enjoy myself without her," Mr. DOYLE said.
Aside from her responsibilities at home and at church, where she helped with various charitable works, Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed a good game of cards. Her bridge club met regularly for 40 years. One favourite memory was from a trip she and Mr. DOYLE took to China in the early 1980s, when she travelled down the Yangtze River playing cards with their guides.
Florence Barbara CHANDA was born on November 30, 1924 in Lynedoch, Ontario, the youngest of six children to farmers Frank and Franis CHANDA. Her early ancestors had cleared the land in this southwestern part of the province using workhorses. They grew turnips and later tobacco. Mrs. DOYLE was very close to her mother, who considered her last child "a gift" because she had her later in life, Judith DOYLE said.
After her father was killed in a car accident when she was about eight years old, Florence was put to work in the tobacco fields and remained on the farm until her older brother took over and she and her mother moved to nearby Chatham. In town, she attended a Catholic high school but soon suffered another tragedy when her mother died. Left without parents, she moved into a local boarding house run by a generous woman remembered as Mrs. Con SHAY/SHEA.
After high school, she found work at Libby's Foods and rose to the rank of office manager. Around that time, she met Dic DOYLE, a young reporter at The Chatham Daily News. The couple married in Chatham in January, 1953.
Not long after they were married, Mrs. DOYLE moved to Toronto, where her husband was by that time at The Globe and Mail. Hired as a copy reader on the news desk in 1951, Mr. DOYLE became editor and then the paper's editor-in-chief from 1963 to 1983.
Judith DOYLE remembers her parent's house as an open and welcoming place. Late at night after Mr. DOYLE and his colleagues left The Globe's office, they would often venture over to the house to talk and unwind from a busy day.
Cameron SMITH, a former editor at The Globe, said of Mrs. DOYLE: "She was one of the most welcoming people that I've known. She made me feel good about whatever I was doing."
Judith will never forget the only Christmas she experienced away from her mother. It was the early 1980s and Judith was in Nicaragua to make a documentary. Mrs. DOYLE managed to track her down and sent a Christmas cake. When the cake arrived, Judith remembers the joy of slicing it into slivers for a group of foreign journalists.
Years later when Judith made another documentary about an Ojibway reserve in Northern Ontario, Mrs. DOYLE befriended some of the people from the reserve when they visited Toronto.
Mrs. DOYLE extended her kindness to animals. Working in the garden of her Toronto home, Mrs. DOYLE could be heard chattering away to the birds and animals, Judith said. The family has photographs of her feeding foxes in the backyard.
"She was the kind of person who had raccoons following her around, " Judith said.
After Mr. DOYLE was appointed to the Senate in 1985, the couple moved to Ottawa. Their years in the capital were among their happiest. They made close Friends and Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed heading across the river to Hull with a friend and a few rolls of quarters to do some gambling. "She had the capacity for developing Friendships that went on throughout her life," Mr. DOYLE said. "She was interested in people."
Florence DOYLE leaves her husband Richard, sister Clara HILLIARD, son Sean and daughter Judith.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-19 published
BABITS, George Joseph B.A.Sc., C.A.
It is with profound sadness that the family announces the passing of a beloved husband, father and grandfather. In his 68th year, George died peacefully on April 15, 2003, surrounded by his loving family, following a courageous and inspiring 3-year battle with kidney cancer. Having overcome an initial 4-month prognosis, he never gave up the fight.
George will live forever in the hearts of his beloved wife and soul mate of 42 years, Katherine, his devoted sons George (Wendy), Thomas (Trisha) and Christopher (Jennifer). His grandchildren Monica, George Matthew, Paul and John will all miss their dear ''Papa.'' The family regrets that he will miss the births of his twin grandchildren due in less than two weeks. Also mourned by his brother Pal, sister Anna and many nephews and nieces in Hungary, as well as his many Friends in Canada and around the world. George was predeceased by his parents and his brother Laszlo.
Born in Debrecen, Hungary, George was a champion weightlifter in his youth, winning numerous regional and national titles. While attending the University of Sopron, he left for Canada as a refugee during the 1956 Revolution. He completed his degree in geological engineering at the University of Toronto, and went on to become a Chartered Accountant. George began his career at the accounting firm Ernst and Ernst, followed by more than 27 years at Imperial Oil Ltd., where he had the opportunity to combine his scientific knowledge with his financial acumen. After retiring from Imperial in 1991, he continued to work in his own accounting practice until his death. Throughout his life, he generously volunteered for numerous organizations, including many in the Canadian-Hungarian community. His sense of charity seemed to know no bounds. He always gave of his time, energy, knowledge and expertise, freely to those in need.
George's greatest passion was his family and his legacy will live on, because it was as a husband and father that he had his greatest success. His love and devotion to his family was boundless, and he has left his children with a great appreciation for the importance of family, education and respect for others. He was the greatest role model that his sons could have possibly asked for, and he will forever be in their hearts. Father we love you.
Many thanks to the fine medical professionals who helped George in his battle and treated him with exceptional care and respect: Doctors BUKOWSKI and COHEN of the Cleveland Clinic, Doctors TSIHLIAS and Waddel of the University Health Network, Doctors KUGLER and STRAUSS of Gottingen, Germany and their pioneering vaccine therapy program, and Doctors BJARNASON and SMITH and the team at the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre.
The family will receive Friends at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 from 7: 30-9:00 p.m. The funeral mass will be held on Wednesday, April 23, 2003, at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Roman Catholic Church (432 Sheppard Ave. E.). Donations to the Sunnybrook Foundation Fund #9182 To Support Kidney Cancer Research (In Memory of George J. Babits) c/o Dr. Georg Bjarnason, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, would be appreciated. Messages of Condolence may be placed at www.rskane.ca.
''Szivunkben Orokke elni fogsz!''

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-19 published
Died This Day -- Leo SMITH, 1952
Saturday, April 19, 2003 - Page F10
Composer, cellist, author, teacher born in Birmingham, England, in 1881; child prodigy; played cello in the Halle and Covent Garden orchestras; in 1910, immigrated to Canada; in 1911, taught at Toronto Conservatory and joined Toronto Symphony; principal cellist 1917-18 and 1932-40; in 1938, appointed professor of music at University of Toronto; wrote Musical Rudiments (1920), Music of the 17th and 18th Centuries (1931) and Elementary Part-Writing (1939); died in Toronto.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
BUTTERY, John William
Jack died at home in Grand Valley on April 10, 2003. A World War 2 veteran, University of Toronto graduate, outdoorsman, curler and voracious reader, Jack is remembered with love by his wife Berva; his mother Iola; his four children: Fran KONOROWSKI (Glen,) Jack (Marg SMITH), Billy (Carmel) and Mary (John SANDRELLI) his ten grandchildren: Kent, Quinn and Reid KONOROWSKI, Allison and Carley SMITH, Jonathan BUTTERY, Billy Joe and Rene BUTTERY, and Jack and Harry SANDRELLI. Also sadly missed by his sister Anne KEWLEY (Mike.) Predeceased by his father Jack Herbert BUTTERY, and his granddaughter Jaclyn KONOROWSKI. Funeral service was held on April 12, 2003; interment will take place at the Grand Valley Cemetery on May 1st at 1: 00 p.m. If you wish, donations may be made to the Headwaters Health Centre in Orangeville or to the Grand Valley Public Library.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
McHUGH, Bishop Paul, S.F.M.
Died peacefully at Providence Centre on Tuesday, May 6th, 2003. Bishop McHUGH was predeceased by his parents, Mary and Peter, and also by his brothers and sisters, Thomas, James, Matthew, Rev. John, S.J., Margaret CRINION, Katherine SMITH, Mary HILL and Peter. Survived by his many nieces and nephews. His Excellency was Ordained to the Holy Priesthood on December 8th, 1954 and Consecrated Bishop of Itacoatiara, Brazil on July 3rd, 1967.
Resting at the Scarborough Foreign Mission Society, 2685 Kingston Road (at Brimley) from 5 p.m. Wednesday, Wake Service at 7: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be Concelebrated in the chapel on Thursday morning at 10: 30 a.m. Interment Priest's Plot, Queen of Clergy Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Scarborough Foreign Missions would be appreciated.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
Died This Day -- Four Ontario boaters, 1986
Thursday, May 22, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto police abandon search for 16-foot boat and occupants lost off Scarborough on Lake Ontario; Mark SMITH, 28, Patricia HEYS, 21, James MASTEN, 20, and Kim MASTEN (Mark's sister,) 20, last seen early May 4, 1986, when boat launched at local marina official and longer private search inexplicably found only a washed-up jacket and a cooler.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
NORMAN- SMITH, Keeva Minette
Born May 16, 2003 in Toronto to Martha NORMAN and P. Roch SMITH, Keeva died peacefully of a brain stem tumour at home on May 28, 2003 with the love of her parents and brother Ronan. Keeva joins her grandparents F. Charles SMITH (1983) and Rose Marie SMITH (2002) in eternal life. She leaves to mourn her grandparents: Sheelagh NORMAN and Gerry PARKES of Toronto; Conolly and Sharon NORMAN of Fairvale, New Brunswick; her uncles and their families: Randy SMITH and Jill BONNETEAU- SMITH and cousins Cole and Jake of Victoria, British Columbia; Christopher and Pamela SMITH and cousins Victoria and Jacqueline of Sugarloaf, New York; Nick NORMAN of Toronto; Renee MAGUIRE and cousin Devyn NORMAN of Huntington Beach, California. Martha, Roch and Ronan would like to extend a tremendous thank you to midwife Katrina KILROY; R.N. Katie WADEY; the nurses and doctors at the Hospital for Sick Children Mt. Sinai; Home Palliative Care Network; Community Care Access Centre and all those who helped in making Keeva's life a full one and ensuring that she had the opportunity to return home to die in dignity with her family. Thanks for coming to meet us Keeva, you are an incredible daughter. Ronan sends you dandelion wishes that you are safe. A visitation with Keeva and her family will take place on Wednesday June 4th from 7 - 9 p.m. at Morley Bedford Funeral Services, 159 Eglinton West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.). A celebration of Keeva's life will be held on Thursday June 5th at 10: 30 am at the Church of the Messiah, Dupont and Avenue Road. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Keeva's memory to Trails Youth Initiatives, 378 Fairlawn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5M 1T8 (416) 787-2457 (www.trails.ca) or the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Died This Day -- Goldwin SMITH, 1910
Saturday, June 7, 2003 - Page F11
Historian and journalist born on August 13, 1823 in Reading, England; educated at Eton and Oxford; appointed Regius Professor of History at Oxford; Disciple of Adam Smith and supporter of British Liberals who championed low tariffs; in 1871, after teaching at Cornell University in United States, moved to Canada; in 1875, married widow of former Toronto mayor William Henry BOULTON and moved into The Grange, a Georgian manor-style home now part of Art Gallery of Ontario; led a critique of Canadian nationalism and Canada's participation in such imperial ventures as the Boer War; wrote Canada and the Canadian Question (1891) to advocate closer ties with United States; died in Toronto.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-14 published
SMITH, Ian Wilson (October 5, 1935 - June 8, 2003)
Ian died with great dignity, after a valiant struggle with cancer ending in the caring environment of Lisaard House, Cambridge, surrounded by loving Friends and family. Deepest thanks to the staff at Lisaard House and Hopesprings who provided a beacon of compassion during his struggle. Ian had an extensive career in marketing after graduating from McGill University. In later years, he had his own marketing consulting business. We will remember his great love of the outdoors with a deep affection for Caledon and the Grand River. His enthusiasm for the people and things he loved, his wonderful command of the English language combined with strong opinions and a dry sense of humour made him a colourful conversationalist. Ian was deeply moved by the caring Friendship of Beth SALHANY, Chaplin Ken BEAL, Joe and Getta DOYLE, Jim PUTT, Diane SIROIS, Desmay SMITH and many other special Friends who helped him on his journey. Ian, son of the late Sydney SMITH, will be greatly missed by his daughter Megan THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (daughter of Daphne SMITH) son-in-law Mike THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and granddaughters Kendra and Kristen. He is survived by his daughter Jennifer FOX, granddaughter Chaelene, mother Dorothy, sister Diane COVINGTON, niece and nephew Tara and Tom McMURTY. Donations can be sent to Lisaard House, Cambridge (519) 650-1121 in Ian's memory.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
SMITH, Ian Wilson (October 5, 1935 - June 8, 2003)
Ian died with great dignity, after a valiant struggle with cancer ending in the caring environment of Lisaard House, Cambridge, surrounded by loving Friends and family. Deepest thanks to the staff at Lisaard House and Hopesprings who provided a beacon of compassion during his struggle. Ian had an extensive career in marketing after graduating from McGill University. In later years, he had his own marketing consulting business. We will remember his great love of the outdoors with a deep affection for Caledon and the Grand River. His enthusiasm for the people and things he loved, his wonderful command of the English language combined with strong opinions and a dry sense of humour made him a colourful conversationalist. Ian was deeply moved by the caring Friendship of Beth SALHANY, Chaplin Ken BEAL, Joe and Getta DOYLE, Jim PUTT, Diane SIROIS, Desmay SMITH and many other special Friends who helped him on his journey. Ian, son of the late Sydney SMITH, will be greatly missed by his daughter Megan THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (daughter of Daphne SMITH) son-in-law Mike THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and granddaughters Kendra and Kristen. He is survived by his daughter Jennifer FOX, granddaughter Chaelene, mother Dorothy, sister Diane COVINGTON, niece and nephew Tara and Tom McMURTRY. Donations can be sent to Lisaard House, Cambridge (519) 650-1121 in Ian's memory.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Lacrosse champ endured racism
Legendary player was subjected to slurs, but he didn't respond. 'It's because you were beating them they were saying it'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page F9
Before every Brantford Warriors lacrosse game in 1971, Ross POWLESS, the team's former player and coach, a member of the Canadian, and later, the Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, crossed the floor to speak with coach Morley KELLS.
As they chatted, Mr. POWLESS wagged his finger at Mr. KELLS, now an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament. To the spectators above, it looked as if he were advising the coach on the upcoming game.
"I kind of laughed, because I knew what was taking place," Mr. KELLS said. "You could always see them up in the stands nodding, thinking, 'Ross has things straightened out.' I didn't mind a bit."
Known for his sense of humour as well as his playing and coaching, Mr. POWLESS died recently at the age of 76.
From 1945 to 1961, he played intermediate and senior level lacrosse in British Columbia, New York State and Southern Ontario, scoring 294 goals and 338 assists during his Senior A career. He contributed to three Mann Cup wins, lacrosse's national championship, for the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1953.
During the 1953 Cup finals, Mr. POWLESS won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player of the series. Also, he was twice given the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
Born a Mohawk on the Six Nations Reserve of the Grand River Territory in Southwestern Ontario, Mr. POWLESS came from a family of talented players. One of his grandfathers, his father and several uncles played on Six Nations teams or with the travelling Mohawk Stars, according to lacrosse historian Stan SHILLINGTON.
And Mr. POWLESS was patriarch to another. Four of his sons played Senior A lacrosse. One of them, Gaylord, joined him in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1990, making them the only father and son pair in the hall.
Ross POWLESS played what his people call "the game the Creator gave us" with skill and ease.
"He was a great, great player," said close friend and former teammate Roger SMITH, also a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame. "He could do it all. He could play defence, offence. He scored a lot of goals, he was a great team player, a great checker, a good corner player, a good loose-ball man. He was one of the best."
A large man, standing above six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, Mr. POWLESS played an especially strong defensive game. "He wasn't fast, but he knew where to cut you off at the pass," said Mr. KELLS, who played against him.
"Ross's attitude was that sooner or later you had to show up heading for the net, so he would be there waiting for you. If anyone had a natural understanding of how the flow of the game should be and how to control it, it was him."
Mr. POWLESS played with handmade hickory sticks, disdaining the later mass-produced plastic sticks as "Tupperware."
A gifted coach who got the best out of his players, he led many teams to divisional and national championships. One of his prouder moments came when he coached six of his sons, including Gaylord, on the 1974 Ontario First Nations Team. The team won the All-Indian Nations Lacrosse Tournament in B.C.
Born on September 29, 1926, in the log cabin his carpenter father built in Ohsweken, Ontario, Alex Ross POWLESS was one of eight children. Although the family lived without running water or hydro, he later told his children that he never felt poor because there was always food on the table.
After his mother died in 1932, Mr. POWLESS attended residential school in nearby Brantford until Grade 8 and then high school for one year. In 1945, at the age of 18, he headed to Vancouver to play on Andy PAULL's Senior North Shore Indians team.
For the next five years, Mr. POWLESS played for intermediate teams in Buffalo, Brantford and Huntsville, Ontario, taking seasonal jobs to support himself. In 1951, he joined the Senior A Peterborough Timbermen.
By 1954, Mr. POWLESS and his wife Wilma, whom he married in 1948, had moved their growing family, which would eventually number 14, back to the family homestead in Ohsweken. There, they lived without electricity until 1957 and without running water until a new house was built in 1970.
Mr. POWLESS continued playing Senior A lacrosse for Hamilton and St. Catharines, and as a pickup player for the Timbermen in the 1956 Mann Cup finals, then moved to Senior B and intermediate teams until he retired from playing in 1961.
Lacrosse was important to a lot of people, but it was extra important to him, Mr. POWLESS told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in January.
Richard POWLESS, another son from the 1974 team, said: "It opened up the world to him. Back in those days, there weren't many Indians playing in the wider world. It got him off the reserve, and he had the talent to go places, and it was recognized."
Often the wider world greeted Mr. POWLESS with racial slurs. The crowd and members of opposing teams called him blanket-ass and wagon-burner and squirted drinks on him.
"You'd get used it, it wouldn't bother you. They wouldn't be saying that if they were beating you. It's because you were beating them they were saying it," Mr. POWLESS told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Richard POWLESS said, "He didn't react to it, he didn't respond to it, it was just part of the burden he had to carry."
Still, Ross POWLESS credited lacrosse with helping him make white Friends across the country. Some of them stood up for him. Once during tryouts for the Timbermen, he entered a bar in Peterborough with some members of the team. Because he did not have a blue card indicating that he had given up his Indian status, he could not drink legally and was refused service.
The Timbermen left the bar saying, "If he's not good enough, we're not good enough neither," author Donald M. FISHER quotes Mr. POWLESS's recollection in Lacrosse: A History of the Game.
Mr. POWLESS was proud of his heritage and maintained its traditions.
However, he did not teach the Mohawk language to his children. Scarred by his experience in residential school, where he was punished for speaking his mother tongue, he and his wife decided not to pass it on. Instead, he told his children that it was a white man's world, and to live in it successfully, they needed to excel in English.
At times, Mr. POWLESS acted politically. In 1959, a group of Mohawks, including him, tried to reinstate the traditional native government. "He was a firm believer in our own system and our own way of doing things," Richard POWLESS said. "When he believed in something, it wasn't just talk and that's the way he raised us."
Mr. POWLESS had settled into carpentry after his return to Ohsweken in 1954, a trade he practised for the next 30 years.
Earning a reputation as a hard worker, he soon became a foreman and, among other projects, worked on the Burlington Skyway Bridge.
Always an avid hunter, fisherman and pool player, Mr. POWLESS worked as a building inspector on the Six Nations Reserve until his retirement in 1991, served as a band councillor for eight years and helped to start Six Nations minor lacrosse and hockey leagues. In 1997, the Ontario Municipal Recreation Association gave him a volunteer service award.
Like many players, Mr. POWLESS was buried with lacrosse sticks. He had told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of his intention, saying, "I want to play with my dad, my sons, my uncles and my nephews."
Mr. POWLESS died on May 26 in Paris, Ontario, of cancer. Sons Victor, Gaylord and Gregory predeceased him. He leaves Wilma, his wife of 55 years, 11 children, 27 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Mark ALLEN, late of the Town of Markham, in the Regional Municipality of York, Province of Ontario, who died on or about the 6th day of March, 2003, must be filed with the personal representative (the "Estate Trustee"), named below, on or before the 15th day of August, 2003, after which date the estate wil be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustee then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 30th day of June, 2003.
Estate Trustee: Patricia Joyce HUGHES
by her solicitors:
Smith and Werker
Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries
Attention: John Osgoode SMITH
4950 Yonge Street, Suite 1800
Toronto, Ontario
M2N 6K1
Telephone: 416-224-0200
Fax: 416-224-0758
Page B11

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
SWINDELL, Gerald S.
Passed away peacefully at the Veterans' Wing of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre in Toronto on July 17, 2003 at the age of 88. Gerry was predeceased by his first wife, Jean WARRINGTON, in 1947, and by his second wife of more than 40 years, Bettie BROCKIE, in 1990, and by his sister Elaine, brother Charles and son-law Andy CLARK. He is survived by his three children, Sharon, Gerry and Carol, his granddaughter Christine MAKI, his sisters Geraldine REES and Marie SMITH, his brothers-in-law Bill BROCKIE and Don SMITH and several nieces and nephews and their families.
Although Gerry was born in Grenfell, Saskatchewan and died in Toronto, he spent most of his life in Winnipeg, Manitoba. A graduate of the University of Manitoba, Gerry spent his entire business career with Wood Gundy, joining the firm in 1938 and retiring as a Vice President and Director in 1974. During the Second World War he served as a Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy. He was an active and enthusiastic member of the Manitoba Club and served as its President in 1975 and 1976. He was also the Chairman of the Board of the Winnipeg Stock Exchange from 1969 to 1972 and was active throughout his business career with a number of charitable organizations.
For relaxation he enjoyed the company of his wife and their many good Friends, frequent dinners at Rae and Jerry's, annual trips to Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, Arizona, golf at the St. Charles Country Club and billiards at the Manitoba Club. Unfortunately, his retirement years were marred by the debilitating effects of Paget's Disease and the untimely death of his beloved wife Bettie. Our thanks to the staff at Deer Lodge Hospital Veterans' Wing and We Care in Winnipeg and at Sunnybrook K Wing and Selectcare in Toronto for all their help in his final years. Although he moved to Toronto in 1997 to be closer to his children, his heart always remained in Winnipeg. He returns there now. A graveside service will be held at Garry Memorial Park, 1291 McGillivray Blvd., Winnipeg on Tuesday, July 29th at 2: 30 p.m. followed by a reception at the on site funeral home. In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of choice would be greatly appreciated.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
WHITEHOUSE, Gladys Yolande Laviolette
Died peacefully at Toronto Western Hospital on Tuesday, July 29, 2003, in her 100th year, one of eight daughters of the late Joseph B. LAVIOLETTE and May Emma SMITH, predeceased in 1961 by her husband, Robert Victor WHITEHOUSE, beloved sister of Dorothy BAIRD of Norwood, Ontario, and Gwyneth NEHER of Peace River, Alberta, and brother-in-law, George NEHER of Newmarket, Ontario, loving aunt of Debbie NEHER, Ginnie NEHER, Gwendy NEHER and Charles NEHER. Longtime member of the congregation and, with her late husband, a most generous benefactor of the Church of the Transfiguration (Anglican), 111 Manor Road East, Toronto. Funeral at the church on Friday, August 1, 2003 at eleven o'clock. Visitation at the church for one hour prior to the service. Cremation. Ashes to be interred beside her husband in the Laviolette family plot in Notre Dame du Neige Cemetery, Montreal. Arrangements entrusted to Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
LEWIS, Paul
Paul Lewis, age 90, died suddenly on Saturday, August 16, 2003 in Pembroke, Ontario. Beloved husband of Sarah Boone LEWIS (nee SMITH) and devoted father to Christine LEWIS (Gary CHANG;) Marion LEWIS (Billie BROCK;) Alan LEWIS (Kerry CALVERT.) Grandfather to Georgia BARKER, Robert CHANG and Ray LEWIS. Predeceased by sister Mary THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Brother-in-law to Davis (Catherine) SMITH of Sarnia Ontario; uncle to Ian THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, the late Scott SMITH, and Grant, Sally Ross SMITH and Price SMITH. Paul was born in Toronto to Marion and Thomas LEWIS. He lived a full and varied life working as a chemical engineer on three continents. Raising his family in Deep River, Ontario, he retired from the Atomic Energy of Canada to Beachburg, Ontario where he continued his interest in gardening and his love of nature. A reception to celebrate his life for family and Friends will be held at Supples Landing Retirement Home in Pembroke on Friday August 22 at 2: 00. In lieu of flowers, a donation to your favourite charity would be appreciated.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
Artist focused on geometric shapes
Sculptor helped to design precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, August 23, 2003 - Page F8
Robert DOWNING thought that he needed lessons in order to become an artist. Entering a storefront studio in his hometown of Hamilton, he paid the $1 fee and was asked what he wanted to make. When he replied that he didn't know, the studio owner told him to come back when he did and gave him back his buck.
Turning to the door, Mr. DOWNING realized that whatever he did was in his own hands. Deciding upon this as the subject of a sculpture, he paid again and, in clay, fashioned a hand with a spike through it. Upon seeing the sculpture, the studio owner returned Mr. DOWNING's dollar, saying, "You don't need me. You know what you want to do."
A creator of sculptures, paintings, prints, photographs and digital art, Mr. DOWNING has died at the age of 67.
His work appeared in the Ontario Centennial Art Exhibit, the National Art Gallery of Canada Sculpture '67 Exhibit and at Habitat during Expo 67. In partnership with sculptor Ted BIELER, Mr. DOWNING designed the precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building and, on his own, designed two of its interior concrete-sculpted walls.
In 1969, he was the first Canadian to have a solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London.
His work is also found in the National Art Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the University of Saskatchewan's gallery and the Singapore National Museum among many others and were included in 77 exhibitions in seven countries. As well, he completed 16 commissions in three countries.
Largely self-taught, Mr. DOWNING, a one-time police officer, burst onto the scene during the late '60s with his Cube Series in aluminum and Plexiglass. A highly intellectual artist, who often explored sophisticated mathematical concepts in his work, he created 108 cube-related sculptures for the series. Seventy-four appeared in the Whitechapel show and the British Arts Council purchased one, The Cube Turned Inside Out Revealing the Relationship of the Sphere.
Mr. DOWNING's work remained centred on geometric shapes throughout his career. "I am one of those people who views geometry as a divine expression of integration between the physical and the spiritual," he wrote in a brochure. He attributed his interest in organic geometry to the works of sculptors Eli Bornstein and Tony Smith, and the Art and Technology Movement.
Despite his intellectual bent, spirituality figured large in Mr. DOWNING's art and provided his inspiration to pursue it. When he was a Hamilton policeman, he was relaxing after a shift. "I suddenly became conscious of the warm glow of a transparent rose-coloured light completely surrounding me," he wrote in his memoirs, Feeling My Way.
"I was still aware of my body, but I felt myself to be extended into and penetrated by this light, which simultaneously caused me to feel radiant pulsations of pure love. It was as though I, somehow, had transcended the physical plane and, for a brief moment of time, experienced a cosmic level of infinite bliss."
Thereafter, Mr. DOWNING felt a new sensitivity to life and found himself in an almost trance-like state when observing the world around him. He left the police force -- and his family -- to become an artist. He maintained, "I've been given to make art in celebration of life as a humble song of praise to the Divine Creator of All."
Mr. DOWNING was born on August 1, 1935, in Hamilton, one of two children of a Canadian Westinghouse labourer and a housekeeper. When he was young, the family lived in a tent while waiting for housing.
In early adolescence, bedridden with a bout of rheumatic fever, Mr. DOWNING discovered that he enjoyed working with his hands by threading macaroni and constructing lilac-shell pictures.
Leaving school at 15 with a Grade 8 education, Mr. DOWNING delivered telegrams before joining the Canadian navy for five years. There he worked in food stores and as a photographer. After the service, Mr. DOWNING joined the Hamilton Police Force.
Early in his art career, Mr. DOWNING became discouraged by his attempts to sell his work in Toronto. He hit the road, travelling to Montreal and then to Vancouver, where he sold his first sculpture in 1962.
Still seeking a direction, he moved with his second wife to California, where they ran an antique shop. Mr. DOWNING experimented with d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and yoga, and participated in a couple of shows.
Returning to Toronto, Mr. DOWNING approached Mr. BIELER, who taught at the University of Toronto, for instruction. With Mr. BIELER's encouragement, he began his exploration of the cube. "He used whatever was available to dig into this and then came up with some quite interesting stuff," said Mr. BIELER, now a professor at York University in Toronto.
Selling his house to pay for shipping his sculpture to Whitechapel Art Gallery, Mr. DOWNING ended up after the show emotionally and financially exhausted. To recover, he spent a year studying the sitar.
After the bubble of government funding for art during Canada's centennial period burst, Mr. DOWNING and other Canadian artists found themselves short of work and money.
"By the end of 1972, my commissions and sales of art had completely evaporated," he wrote in a preamble to his Fibonacci Series. The only job he could find was teaching at an Ontario private school.
Throughout his career, Mr. DOWNING taught at several institutions, including U of T, the Ontario College of Art and the Banff School of Fine Art, all the while living a hand-to-mouth existence. Still, despite a lack of money and critical attention, he created prolifically, in series that often overlapped, carefully recording his creative process and organizing his works.
During the '70s, influenced by Mr. Bornstein's work, Asian philosophy, crystals and numerology, he explored the hexagon, producing a trial printing set for children and his I'Ching Series, a notebook in which he placed a diary-like record beside a tangram (a Chinese puzzle consisting of five triangles, a square and a rhomboid) based on a computer printout.
While in hospital in 1974 with a heart attack, Mr. DOWNING worked with construction paper and scissors and formed a three-dimensional shape that led to the Fibonacci Series, also called the Nothing Series. The 24 solid-steel castings and eight metal powder and fibreglass life-sized sculptures reflect a system Mr. DOWNING said he discovered, of combining squares, equilateral triangles and pentagons. Some of the works' proportions contained the Fibonacci ratio. (In the Fibonacci sequence -- 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 etc. -- each successive number is equal to the sum of the preceding two numbers.)
When discharged from the hospital, Mr. DOWNING was unable to pay his mortgage. He sold the house and moved with his third wife and family to California, where he lived from 1974 to 1978. He taught at California State College in Long Beach and continued with the Fibonacci Series.
Entering the '80s, Mr. DOWNING turned to conceptual/performance art. In conceptual art, the works themselves are not considered important, but are intended to examine the language and system of art. Performance art presents actual events as art to a live audience, as opposed to the illusions of events presented by theatre.
For the series Art Isn't? Mr. DOWNING used a Canada Council grant to solicit work from the presidents of Canada's top 500 companies. Asked by the council to reimburse the money because he had not used it to create art, Mr. DOWNING agreed to send a monthly cheque for 10 per cent of his income. The amount came to $2.
The Canada Council responded with a request for a bigger cheque and Mr. DOWNING complied. Using a photocopier, he enlarged a $2 cheque and sent it off.
"He was desperately honest and he would not put up with bullshit at all," sculptor and artist Gord SMITH said. "He stayed on top of the Canada Council.... He believed passionately in the culture and knew it was going down."
Also during the '80s, Mr. DOWNING produced many Documeditation works, which included Transentials in Space, the work he said in 1992 was the most significant of his life. Describing it as a visual literacy program, he spent two years developing the three-volume work.
Always an outspoken advocate for his calling, Mr. DOWNING helped to found Canadian Artists Representatives in 1967. Driven, brilliant, often difficult and prickly, he was frustrated by his inability to qualify for grants from the Ontario government. He lacked the formal training the government required and went to the offices of the Minister of Culture and Citizenship to state his case. Screaming, " This isn't art?" Mr. DOWNING hurled his portfolio to the ground. The minister's office called the police.
Mr. DOWNING described his Closet Art, from 1984 to 1987, as "an installation piece which outgrew the confines of two large storage closets and raised the question of how practical it was for a senior artist to continue playing the role of an unpaid custodian of earlier work that had long proven itself to qualify as legitimate cultural property."
He donated the works to the Art Gallery of Hamilton, counting the 250-page record of his negotiations with the gallery as a Documeditation. "Coming back to these [donated] works again and again one is reminded of the expansive scope of Mr. DOWNING's thinking, of the evolving nature of his practice," said the gallery's chief curator, Shirley MADILL.
Mr. DOWNING left Canada once again to make a living in the late '80s, working and teaching in Botswana and Singapore. Returning because of ill health, he spent his last years largely confined to his apartment. He found a creative outlet, producing computer-generated images, once again exploring geometric forms. In 1998, as artist-in-residence at the U of T, he developed a Web site containing a retrospective of his work.
Always outspoken, a quality that alienated many, in the spring of 2002, he published an Internet manifesto announcing his resignation as a practising Canadian artist. In it, he chastized business, government, galleries and academia for not supporting artists in general and him in particular.
At his death on July 22, Mr. DOWNING had not sold his work in Canada for the past 15 years. Still he continued to promote it, even receiving a posthumous rejection.
"Robert's first love was his art, and his life was his art, and that's the beginning and end of it," said his fourth wife, Mickey DOWNING.
Mr. DOWNING leaves his wife, Mickey, two ex-wives, children Michael DOWNING and Sara ROBINSON, and three grandchildren.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-09 published
Ernestine Millicent BLACKMAN- SMITH
By Mary Anne TOPERCZER Tuesday, September 9, 2003 - Page A24
Daughter, sister, wife, mother. Born November 30, 1912, in Toronto. Died February 10, in Brampton, Ontario, of congestive heart failure, aged 90.
Ernie was the third of eight children born to Rosalie and Ernest BLACKMAN who emigrated from England to Toronto in the early 1900s. Ernie's ambition in life was to marry and be a mother. At the age of 18, she set her sights on John Clare KRAWCZYK- SMITH and in 1932, at the age of 19, Ernie converted to Catholicism and they married. Their love affair lasted until John's death in Ernie always said that she was lucky -- not everyone takes to motherhood and homemaking but she did. Lucky for us that it was my mother's natural vocation. Ernie's life had meaning and purpose through meal preparation, housekeeping and the love and care of her children.
She gave birth to nine children within 21 years -- and this included two sets of twins!
She was organized and had a routine. Monday was wash day and for many years that meant a wringer washer and clothes on a line. Friday was the day for grocery shopping.
Sunday was Mass at 9 a.m. and dinner at 6 p.m. consisting of a roast, potatoes and homemade pie. The parish pastor was a regular guest at these dinners. The remainder of the week was filled with cooking, cleaning, baking, sewing and the supervision of her large family.
Her nurturing extended to her ailing sister and aging mother, as well as neighbours and the community at large through her work for the church and the missions. When we arrived home for lunch and returned from school each day, she greeted us with her warmth and we felt safe, loved and secure.
I can never recall that Ernie had an idle moment. She thrived on being needed and engaged in a meaningful task for someone.
When she needed a rest she put the kettle on, as she had learned from her mother the importance of a cup of tea. This break for tea each afternoon refreshed her and became the social framework for every visit with family and Friends throughout her life.
We were kept busy during the summer because of Ernie's job jar. We would blindly choose pieces of paper from that jar each morning and our selections determined the household tasks that would occupy us until lunch. We learned skills that prepared us for raising our own families.
Our summers were highlighted by two weeks at a cottage on Lake Simcoe where our days were magically filled with swimming, new Friends, seasonal fruit and parents who were relaxed and enjoying their offspring. Even though a rental cottage meant more work for Ernie, she was not deterred as she realized that the cottage experience would have long-term benefits for the family.
She found each one of her children special in their own way and we all had our own unique connection with her. There was a sense of stability in our family because of her. Ernie felt that there was no greater purpose in life than to be responsible for the lives of others.
After her husband's death, she lived in her home for three years with the assistance of her children and spent her final declining year in the home of one of her daughters.
Her funeral was attended by her family of more than 50 people her granddaughters served as pallbearers.
A son wrote her eulogy and a grand_son played the bagpipes -- a fitting tribute to a grand lady.
Mary Anne is Ernestine SMITH's daughter.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-20 published
Willis Raymond SMITH
By Brad SMITH Monday, October 20, 2003 - Page A16
Electrical engineer, father, friend. Born August 30, 1910, in Hamilton, Ontario Died December 30, 2002, in Zephyrhills, Florida, of natural causes, aged 92.
Bill SMITH lived a life that spanned much of the 20th century. It is altogether fitting that it is so, because he was truly a man of that century.
After quitting school at the age of 15, he went on to become one of the top men in the world in the field of railway electrical engineering and design. His first real job, however, was with a clothing company in Hamilton -- the city of his birth -- where he worked 10 hours a day and was paid $8 a week.
He soon sought out more challenging -- and rewarding -- work and in 1928, he followed in his father's footsteps and was hired on as a signal helper for the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway.
This work piqued a passion for electrical engineering which would last for more than 70 years.
Bill worked a number of jobs throughout the Depression: with the T.H&B, the Canadian Pacific Railway and the General Railway Signal Co. For the Canadian Pacific Railway, he wired the Centralized Traffic Control system at Leaside Station in Toronto.
By 1941, he had acquired an engineer's degree through correspondence courses.
Bill worked across Canada, installing signal systems in the 1940s and early 1950s. Then, in 1955, he was offered a position as research-and-development engineer with General Railway Signal in Rochester, N.Y.
There, he was instrumental in the concept and design of the signal system for the Bay Area Rapid Transit in San Francisco, a concept that was also used in Boston, Washington and Atlanta.
By the time he retired from General Railway Signal Co., he had something like 89 patents in his name with the United States Patent Office. According to the conditions of his contract, he was paid one dollar for each.
In 1974, at the age of 64, Bill went to South Africa to oversee the installation of the signal system for the Iron Ore railway, a private line which ran 600 miles from the Atlantic coast above Capetown to the iron mines near Botswana.
When he arrived in apartheid-era South Africa, the first thing he did was to restructure the pay schedule for the non-white workers on the project and while he wasn't a confrontational type, his was the final word on that subject.
He successfully completed the project and retired in 1977.
Upon retiring, he single-handedly built a house near Fairhaven, New York and spent the next 25 years between there and Zephyrhills, Florida
Bill SMITH was my uncle and I had the opportunity to live and to work with him during his time in South Africa. He was a man of insatiable curiosity about anything and everything he encountered.
He could talk for hours about anything from the viscosity index of motor oil to the proper way to hit a golf ball -- something, I might add, that he never really mastered.
He was that rare workaholic who somehow always found the time to go to dinner, to dance, to fish, to make it to the party at the end of the day.
Bill leaves his wife, Fran; his daughters Lenore, June and Carolynne and his son, Rick. He remained in contact with Friends from his youth and is remembered by hundreds of others from around the world.
If Bill SMITH had a fault it was that he was too trusting -- he assumed that everyone he encountered was as honest a man as he was, that every guy out there was as good as his word.
We should all suffer from such faults.
Brad SMITH is Bill SMITH's nephew.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
KELLY, Thomas Patrick " Tim" (1922 - 2003)
Tim KELLY of Bromley Avenue, Moncton, died peacefully at the Moncton Hospital on Monday October 27, 2003. He was born in Toronto on October 18, 1922 and was the son of the late Emmett and Barbara (DOLLY) KELLY. Tim worked as a senior executive with Canadian Marconi Company, Montreal, Quebec and a business owner of the electronics distributor Keldon Electronics Limited, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In 1979 he established the Moncton, New Brunswick based consumer electronics retailer, Sounds Fantastic Atlantic Limited. As a business leader Tim had a gift for marketing and financial management. He built a strong business that grew and flourished well after his retirement in 1986, which is a legacy to his sound planning and leadership. He was one of the original believers in the United Way and was an active member of the Elks Lodge of Moncton since 1979. As well Tim served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-1945. Tim is survived by his wife of 54 years, Ivy Anita (née TRUMBLEY) and seven children: Brian (Lynne ARSENEAULT) of Peterborough, Steve of Dieppe, Jeff (Lila DONOVAN) of Moncton, Brad (Sandra THORBURN) of Edmonton, Scott (Jamie PENFOLD) of Moncton, Jan KOSHYLANYK (Terry) of Ancaster and Jill SMITH (Gary) of Riverview. He will be dearly missed by his 17 grandchildren: Kevin, Autumn, Christopher, Patrick, Jessica, Ryan, Alison, Kieran, Nicholas, Regan, Tyler, Wesley, Stephen, Kaileigh, Brandon, Morgan and Talia, as well his 2 great grand_sons Carter and William. He is also survived by his sisters Bernie KELLY of Beaconsfield and Barbara MURPHY (Ted) Uxbridge, and a brother Paul of Ottawa. He was predeceased by brothers Fred and Jim. Visiting hours will be held at Cadman's Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 with parish prayers to be held at the funeral home Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held from St. Bernard's Catholic Church on Friday October 31 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter McKEE officiating. The interment will take place at Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery, Dieppe. Donations to the memorial of the donor's choice would be appreciated by the family. The family would like to thank the staff at both the Dr. George L. Dumont Hospital and the Moncton Hospital for the professional and loving care that they provided to Tim, as well to our family over the last few months. There are truly many angels at both our hospitals. www.cadmansfh.com

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-30 published
SMART, Worts Lennox
Len died October 29th. in his 92nd year. Born in Toronto, he attended Rosedale Public School, Trinity College School and University of Toronto. He served in the Air Force during the 2nd World War as Navigation Instructor in Manitoba. After the war he worked for many years at Gulf Oil as an accountant. His wife, Passchen (Peggy) MATHEWS predeceased him. He is survived by his brother John Lennox SMITH, his sister Anna Marie RAGSDALE, nephews David SMART and Dean SMART. A Memorial service will be held on Friday, October 31, 2003 at Mount Pleasant Crematorium Chapel, 375 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Toronto, at 2 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. (Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Directors).

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
The crash of a Canadian hero
Lest we forget, Roy MacGREGOR traces the spectacular feats and the sad fall of a flying ace
By Roy MacGREGOR, Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - Page A1
Ottawa -- Here is as good a place as any to lay a small poppy on Remembrance Day.
It is nothing but a concrete dock ramp on the Ontario shore of the Ottawa River, not far downstream from the Parliament Buildings.
There is nothing here to say what happened that cold March day back in 1930, and on this, a fine brisk morning in November, 73 years later, there is only a lone biker, a man walking two setters along the path that twists along this quiet spot, and a small, single-engine airplane revving in the background as it prepares to take off from the little Rockcliffe airstrip.
Seventy-three years ago, another small plane took off from this airfield, turned sharply over the distant trees, flew low and full-throttle over the runway and went into a steep climb that eventually cut out the engine and sent the new Fairchild twisting toward this spot -- instantly killing Canada's most-decorated war hero.
Will BARKER, 35, of Dauphin, Manitoba
Perhaps you've heard of him. Likely not. He is, in some ways, the test case for Lest We Forget.
Lieutenant-Colonel William George BARKER won the Victoria Cross for what many believe was the greatest dogfight of the First World War.
He was alone in his Sopwith Snipe over Bois de Marmal, France, on October 27, 1918, when he was attacked, official reports say, by 60 enemy aircraft -- Mr. BARKER, who rarely talked of his war experience, always said 15 -- and he shot down three before passing out from devastating wounds to both legs and his arm, only to come to again in mid-air, turn on the fighter intending to put an end to him and bring down a fourth before he himself crash-landed in full view of astonished British troops, who were even more amazed when they got to the plane and found him still alive, if barely.
The four that one day took Mr. BARKER's list to 50 downed aircraft. He returned to Canada as Lt.-Col. William George BARKER, V.C., D.S.O. and enough other medals to lay claim to being Canada's most honoured combatant -- if he'd ever cared to do so. As British Air Chief Marshal Sir Philip JOUBERT wrote, "Of all the flyers of the two World Wars, none was greater than BARKER."
He came home and went into the aviation business with another Canadian Victoria Cross winner, Billy BISHOP. He married Mr. BISHOP's wealthy cousin, Jean SMITH, and had a miserable next dozen years. The business failed, the marriage teetered, he suffered depression and terrible pain from his injuries, and the previous non-drinker soon became a drinker.
It seemed life was taking a turn for the better in January of 1930 when Fairchild hired him to help sell planes to the Canadian government. A test pilot had been sent to show off the plane at Rockcliffe, but the veteran fighter unfortunately insisted on taking it up himself for a run.
Some say he committed suicide here; some say he was showing off for an 18-year-old daughter of another Rockcliffe pilot; his biographer believes he was just being too aggressive with a new, unknown machine and "screwed up."
They held the funeral in Toronto, with a cortege two miles long, 2,000 uniformed men, honour guards from four countries and 50,000 people lining the streets. As they carried the coffin into Mount Pleasant Cemetery, six biplanes swooped down, sprinkling rose petals over the crowd.
"His name," Sir Arthur CURRIE announced, "will live forever in the annals of the country which he served so nobly."
His name, alas, is not even on the crypt -- only " SMITH," his wife's snobbish family who never really accepted the rough-hewn outsider from Manitoba.
Somehow, he became all but forgotten. Though Mr. BISHOP called Mr. BARKER "the deadliest air fighter that ever lived," it is Mr. BISHOP who lives on in the public imagination. Often, if Mr. BARKER is mentioned at all, "Billy" BARKER, as he was known to his air colleagues, is confused with "Billy" BISHOP.
A request for a government plaque to commemorate his Manitoba birthplace was rejected the first time, but there is now some small recognition thanks in large part to the work of Inky MARK, the Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan Lake and the excellent military biography, BARKER VC, produced a few years back by Wayne RALPH.
Mr. RALPH, a Newfoundlander now living in White Rock, British Columbia, thinks Mr. BARKER was simply too much "the warrior" for the Canadian appetite.
"He was an international superstar," says Mr. RALPH. " BARKER had all the traits of the great Hollywood heroes. He was disobedient, gregarious, flamboyant. He was a frontier kid, a classical figure in the American style of hero. Born in a log cabin, went on to fame and fortune, and died tragically at 35.
"Now he is basically buried in anonymity. To me, it's the perfect metaphor for Canada, where we bury our past."
Today, though, even if it is only a poppy dropped at the end of a concrete boat ramp, we will remember.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Two charged after man dies in shooting
By Erin POOLEY, Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page A16
Toronto police have charged two men, 17 and 22, with second-degree murder in the death of a Brampton man outside a Scarborough townhouse on Thursday.
Police were called to 110 Empringham Dr. around 2: 30 p.m., after gunshots were heard. Andred EDWARDS, 24, was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics.
Charged is Kalito SMITH, 22, of Toronto, and a 17-year-old.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
SMITH, Pamela Kathleen, 57, of Marysville, Ohio, formerly of Whitby, Ontario, Canada died at her home December 6, 2003, after a long and courageous battle with cancer. She was born June 25, 1946 to the late Ida Winifred SMITH in Nottingham, England. After completing her schooling she immigrated to Canada at the age of 19. She previously worked at the Ontario Workers' Compensation Board as a Special Needs Adjudicator, where she managed the unique medical and life care needs of seriously injured workers. She was admitted to the 'Quarter Century Club' there in 1991 and retired from the Board in 1997, after more than 30 years of exemplary service. She moved from Canada to Marysville with her husband in 1998. She will be lovingly remembered as a kind and caring wife and a friend to all. Pam enjoyed travel, skiing, knitting and sewing, and home decorating. She was especially accomplished and devoted to her beautiful English garden. Pam was a patron of the arts enjoying the theater and collecting the works of Trisha Romance and others, and of course amassing her Longaberger basket collection. She was a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Marysville. Her husband, Dr. Robert SMITH currently of Marysville, Ohio, and a cousin, Peter ADAM/ADAMS of Hucknall, England, survive her, along with numerous Friends. A Celebration of Pam's life will be held Thursday, December 11, 2003, at 3: 00 p.m. at St. Paul's Church-on-the-Hill in Pickering. Father Don BEATTY will officiate. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, Ontario Division, 1639 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2W6. The Mannasmith Funeral Home in Marysville [(937) 642-1751] is assisting the family with arrangements.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
Husband, wife found dead in their car kilometres from home
By Erin CONWAY- SMITH, Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page A18
A couple who vanished a week ago were found dead in their car yesterday a few kilometres west of their Etobicoke home. The husband was still behind the wheel and his wife was in the passenger seat.
Toronto Police had issued a provincewide alert for Steve YAREMA, 82, and his wife Tekla, 78, after they disappeared last Thursday without contacting their two daughters or long-time neighbours. Police called their behaviour unusual and were particularly concerned because Mr. YAREMA had a heart ailment and had left his medication at home.
The couple's car was found yesterday morning at the edge of a soccer field, deep in a ravine behind a Slovenian nursing home in south Etobicoke near Highway 427.The blue Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme appeared to have broken through a thicket, plunged down a steep hill and somehow avoided hitting a cluster of tall trees before coming to rest at the far side of the field.
A nursing-home staff member discovered the car and called police, Detective Nelson ANDREW said. Forensic experts and accident reconstruction specialists were dispatched to determine how the couple died.
Last night, police had not released the details of what had happened and Det. ANDREW would not say whether foul play is suspected in the case.
"We're not ruling anything out at this point," he said, adding that autopsies will likely be performed today.
Long-time residents of Lillibet Road, the YAREMAs were described by neighbours as kind and dignified people.
After hearing the couple were missing, neighbours began keeping an eye out for them.
"We were all keeping watch on the house," said Natalie CHYRSKY, 48, a neighbour who has known the YAREMAs for more that 15 years. "Waiting to see that blue car come rolling in."
She said it was very difficult to learn that the car had been found only a few short kilometres from the their home.
Mr. YAREMA took great pride in his 1995 Oldsmobile, prizing the mobility and independence it afforded him and his wife in their later years, Ms. CHYRSKY said.
Although his health problems had escalated last summer, the couple were still able to live in their home and take good care of the property, she said.
"I don't think Mr. YAREMA liked the idea of an old-folks home. He was very proud, very independent," Ms. CHYRSKY said.
"After being married for so long, they really looked out for each other."
Mr. YAREMA was a retired construction supervisor and Mrs. YAREMA was a homemaker. Like Ms. CHYRSKY and several other neighbours, both were of Ukrainian heritage.
Family was very important to the YAREMAs.
The two daughters lived nearby and the couple had several grandchildren, Ms. CHYRSKY said.
The YAREMAs loved tending their perennial flower garden and their huge vegetable garden and every summer would take Ms. CHYRSKY a basket of tomatoes, fresh off the vine.
"They really lived for their garden," she said.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-16 published
Former National Hockey Leaguer MAGNUSON killed, RAMAGE injured in car crash
By Erin CONWAY- SMITH, Tuesday, December 16, 2003 - Page S1
Former National Hockey League defenceman Keith MAGNUSON was killed in a three-car collision yesterday when he was a passenger in a car driven by former Toronto Maple Leaf captain Rob RAMAGE.
RAMAGE was injured in the car crash north of Toronto.
MAGNUSON played 11 years with the Chicago Black Hawks.
York Regional Police said RAMAGE was driving a blue Intrepid that was involved in the accident, caused when one of the vehicles apparently went out of control.
RAMAGE was in an Etobicoke, Ontario, hospital last night, being treated for a broken femur, police said.
The accident, which occurred in Vaughan, happened about 5 p.m., but rescue workers were unable to remove the body until after 10 p.m. Police didn't believe weather was a factor in the accident.
Sergeant Igor CHOMIAK said late last night that an investigation is under way.
A third person, a woman, was being treated for non-life threatening injuries last night.
It was reported that RAMAGE was travelling back to Toronto from Bolton, northwest of the city, after attending the funeral of former National Hockey League player Keith McCREARY, who died last week after a battle with cancer. McCREARY was the chair of the National Hockey League Alumni Association and RAMAGE is the vice-chair.
RAMAGE is a frequent guest commentator on FanSports KFNS, a St. Louis radio station. Last night, the station had posted a notice on an internal bulletin board informing staff about RAMAGE's accident.
RAMAGE, 44, played 1,044 games in the National Hockey League from 1979 to 1994. He served as Maple Leaf captain from 1989 to 1991.
MAGNUSON was born on April 27, 1947, in Wadena, Saskatchewan. He played college hockey at Denver University, where he helped the Pioneers to the N.C.A.A. championship in 1968 and 1969. He was a mainstay on defence for the Blackhawks from 1969 to 1979.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Mississauga man arrested in stabbing death of wife
By Erin CONWAY- SMITH, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A17
A Mississauga man was arrested in the death of his wife after she was found stabbed at their home early yesterday morning.
Zofia BONDER, 45, died shortly after arriving at hospital with a fatal stab wound to her chest.
Her husband, Maciej BONDER, 46, was found at the family home with self-inflicted stab wounds.
He was treated for the minor injuries and released from hospital into the custody of Peel Regional Police, who were to charge him with second-degree murder yesterday. He will appear in court today.
The BONDERs have three children, all home at the time of the incident.
There were no other injuries.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
EZEARD, Muriel Mary (née RAVEN)
It is with great sadness that the family of Muriel EZEARD announces her passing on December 22, 2003. Muriel died peacefully at Christie Gardens in her 92nd year. She was the much beloved wife of the late George EZEARD and dear mother of Ken (Margot) and Dianne (Stephen HAIST.) ''Nana '' of Doug (Kim,) Debbie (Marc DOIRON) of Prince Edward Island; and Katherine, Susan and Evan HAIST of Toronto. Cherished great-grandmother of Jason, Janessa, Jacob, Jacayla, Julia and Caitlyn. Loved sister of Orma CALDER and Velma (Howie SMITH.) Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 from 10 a.m. until the time of service at 11 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. If desired remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation
''Muriel will be missed but forever loved and remembered''.

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SMITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
FAICHNEY, Kathryn Helena (née SIEGNER)
Kay died December 26, 2003, at Victoria Place, Kitchener, Ontario, after a period of declining health related to Alzheimer's Disease. She turned 81 on May 30 of this year.
Wife for 55 years of the late Leslie FAICHNEY. Mother of Sheila (Paul MURDOCK), John, and Jennifer (Paul MILLETT). Grandmother of Sara (Cameron SMITH) and Thomasina MURDOCK. Sister of John SIEGNER (Mary SCHAFER) and Carolyn (Stephen BURKART.) Sister-in-law of Bette FAICHNEY.
Kay grew up in Kitchener and recalled with special fondness her grandparents J.M. and Helena SCHNEIDER. She studied history and library science at MacMaster and Toronto Universities, and pursued careers as a librarian and homemaker, living in Montreal, New York State, New Jersey, Ohio, and Kitchener-Waterloo. In recent years she was active in the Canadian Federation of University Women. She found pleasure in books, theatre, and jazz, but took her greatest satisfaction in her family and Friends.
Special thanks to many devoted caregivers at Victoria Place, as well as, particularly, Bekira, Hedy, Jackie, Tania, Sarah, and Sky.
Friends will be received at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, on Wednesday, December 31, 2003, from 1-2 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel at 2 p.m., Margaret NALLY officiating. Interment (private) at Woodland Cemetery, Kitchener, will occur prior to the service.

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SMITHSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
SMITHSON, Minna Marion (née RUMPEL)
In Kitchener, on Thursday, April 10, 2003. Born August 14, 1912, Minna was in her 91st year. She and her parents, Walter George RUMPEL and Marion Louise KOCH had all been born in old Berlin (Kitchener). After all these years, Minna has finally gone dancing with Jake, her best friend, companion and husband John Robertson SMITHSON who died 41 years ago in Kitchener. She will always be fondly remembered as a loving mother of Sydney Ann SMITHSON of Cambridge and John Thomas SMITHSON and his wife Elly of Vancouver, British Columbia; as a devoted sister of John Walter RUMPEL of Kitchener; as an enthusiastic aunt of David John RUMPEL and wife Renie of Waterloo, Reverend Sidney SMITHSON and his wife Elizabeth of London, Mary SMITHSON of Oakville; as a loving aunt to several nieces and nephews, great-nieces and nephews in Ontario and British Columbia. For many years, Minna had been a teacher in the Kitchener schools and since the death of her husband had been a member of Saint John's Anglican Church. The family wishes to extend special thanks to her companions and Friends that have cared for her over the last years at her home and also to her nurses in The Frank and Glady Voisin Intensive Care Unit/Coronary Care Unit, Saint Mary's General Hospital, Kitchener. The family will receive Friends at the Ratz- Bechtel Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 621 King Street West, Kitchener, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday. Funeral services with family and Friends will be conducted at The Church of Saint John The Evangelist, 23 Water Street North, Kitchener at 11 a.m. on Monday with Reverend Sid SMITHSON and Archdeacon Neil CARVER officiating. As expressions of sympathy, the family would appreciate donations to the Saint John The Evangelist Anglican Church Building Fund or to the charity of your choice.

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