STACEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
KEITH, Jean Campbell
On September 12, 2003, in her 90th year, Jeannie, whose light brown hair had long since turned to silver, died after a third bout with cancer. She was a proud graduate ''with honour'' of University College, at the University of Toronto, in mathematics and sciences, in 1935, a time when these fields of study did not always welcome women. Employed in the actuarial department of Canada Life Insurance Company, she married Arthur George KEITH on May 1, 1940, after a long engagement, immediately before he went overseas with the Second Field Regiment of the Royal Canadian Engineers. After his safe return and many years together in Port Credit and Toronto, Art and Jeannie retired to the Bowmanville area, where both were active in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Jeannie was predeceased by her brother, Howard, in 1994 and by Arthur in 1996. She will be tenderly remembered by her children and their partners: Maggie KEITH and Robert STACEY; Gordon KEITH and Shanna FAROUGH; and Louise WATSON and Don LOREE; and by her sisters-in-law Marian BEATTY of Saint Mary's, and Louisa KEITH of Toronto. Her family thanks the staff of the Altamont Nursing Home for their care and compassion and her Friends and minister at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church and Wilmot Creek for the love and support that enabled Jeannie to live her last years with grace and dignity. Friends may call at the Northcutt Elliott Funeral Home, 53 Division Street North, Bowmanville, on Sunday, September 14 (2: 00-4:00 P.M. and 7:00-9:00 P.M.). The funeral will take place at the funeral home at 1: 00 P.M. on Monday, September 15, 2003, followed by tea at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 47 Temperance Street, Bowmanville. In place of flowers, the family would welcome donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church Accessbility Fund or the Alzheimer's Society.

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STACKHOUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Hockey coach who changed the game
'Captain Video' introduced new teaching tools in more than 25 years with the National Hockey League
By William HOUSTON Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page R5
The morning after Roger NEILSON was fired from his first of seven head coaching jobs in the National Hockey League, he returned to his office at Maple Leaf Gardens.
He viewed and edited the videotape of the Toronto Maple Leafs' loss to the Montreal Canadiens the night before. When a replacement didn't show up, he put the Leafs through a practice. Later, he was asked by a reporter why he was still hanging around.
"Somebody had to run the practice," he said. "Whoever comes in will have to look at the tapes."
The next day, Mr. NEILSON was reinstated when the club could not find a replacement, but Maple Leafs owner Harold BALLARD, always looking for publicity, wanted to make his return behind the bench a surprise. Mr. BALLARD tried to talk him into wearing a ski mask or bag over his head, and then dramatically throwing it off at the start of the game. Numbed by the three-day ordeal of not knowing his status in the organization, Mr. NEILSON almost agreed, but ultimately declined.
"He hated that story," said Jim GREGORY, who hired Mr. NEILSON to coach the Leafs in 1977 and was fired along with the coach at the end of the 1978-79 season. "I hated that story."
The incident reflected poorly on Mr. BALLARD, but in a smaller way it helped create the image of Mr. NEILSON we have today, that of a coach who put the team ahead of his ego, who was loyal to his players and dedicated to his job.
Mr. NEILSON, who died Saturday after a long battle with cancer, will be remembered not just as a man who loved hockey, but also as a skilled strategist and innovator. He stressed defensive play and systems, and also physical fitness. In Toronto, he was given the nickname "Captain Video," because he was among the first to use videotape to instruct his players and prepare for games.
When Mr. NEILSON, a soft-spoken man famous for his dry sense of humour, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame last year, he was asked about the late, controversial Leafs owner.
"I'm sure he's looking up rather than down," he said, with a smile, before saying Mr. BALLARD did some "good things for hockey."
Mr. NEILSON was also named to the Order of Canada in January.
Roger Paul NEILSON was born in Toronto on June 16, 1934, and went as far as Junior B hockey as a player. While earning a degree at McMaster University in Hamilton, he started coaching kids baseball and hockey.
After graduating, he taught high school in Toronto and his passion by then was coaching. In hockey, he won Toronto and provincial titles at different levels. In 10 years, his Metro Toronto midget baseball teams won nine championships, once defeating a team that included pitcher Ken DRYDEN, who would later become a Hall of Fame goaltender with the Montreal Canadiens.
Mr. NEILSON scouted for the Peterborough Petes of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League before moving to Peterborough in 1966 to coach the team. During his 10 years behind the bench, the Petes never finished below third place and won the league championship once.
By the time Mr. NEILSON moved to the National Hockey League to coach the Leafs in 1977, his reputation for creativity and also mischief was firmly established. In baseball, he used, at least once, a routine involving a peeled apple, in which the catcher threw what appeared to be the ball wildly over the third baseman, prompting the runner to race home. As the apple lay in the outfield, the catcher met the runner at home plate with the real baseball in his glove.
Always looking for a loophole in the rules, Mr. NEILSON's ploys instigated rule changes in hockey. On penalty shots against his team, he used Ron STACKHOUSE, a big defenceman, instead of a goalie. Mr. STACKHOUSE would charge out of the net and cause the shooter to flub his shot. The rule was subsequently changed to require the goalie to stay in his crease.
Over an National Hockey League career that lasted more than 25 years, Mr. NEILSON holds the record for most teams coached (seven.) He also held four assistant coaching positions. But he never won the Stanley Cup. He didn't coach great teams. He seemed to enjoy the challenge of taking an average group of players, making them into a solid, defensive unit, and seeing them succeed.
In his first year with the Leafs, he moulded a previously undisciplined group of players into a strong unit that upset the New York Islanders in the 1978 playoffs.
In 1982, Mr. NEILSON's playoff success with the Vancouver Canucks underscored his skill as a tactician and manipulator.
When Canuck head coach Harry NEALE was suspended late in the season, Mr. NEILSON, his assistant, took over. The Canucks weren't expected to advance past the first round of the playoffs. But backed by strong goaltending from Richard BRODEUR, they defeated the Calgary Flames and then the Los Angeles Kings to advance to the semi-finals against Chicago.
The Canucks won the first game, but with Chicago leading 4-1 late in the second game, Mr. NEILSON, unhappy with the officiating, waved a white towel from the bench, as if to surrender to the referee. He was fined for the demonstration, but the white towel became a symbol of home-fan solidarity. In the Stanley Cup final, the Canucks were swept by the powerhouse Islanders.
In addition to Toronto and Vancouver, Mr. NEILSON's journey through the National Hockey League consisted of head coaching jobs with the Buffalo Sabres, the Kings, New York Rangers, Florida Panthers and Philadelphia Flyers. He worked as a co-coach in Chicago, and as an assistant coach with the Sabres, St. Louis Blues and Ottawa Senators.
Ottawa, where he was hired in 2000, was his final destination. In the 2001-02 season, head coach Jacques MARTIN stepped down for the final two games of the regular season to allow Mr. NEILSON to coach his 1,000th regular-season game.
Frank ORR, who covered hockey for The Toronto Star for more than 30 years, said, in 2002, "Roger is one of the few people I've met in any line of work who never had a bad word to say about anybody."

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STADELMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
BINDING, Dr. Frederick Richard Stadelman (May 13, 1938 - August Died suddenly at Cape Chin, at the age of 65. Predeceased by his father, Fred STADELMAN in 1938, his step-father Fred BINDING in 1979, and his mother Gertrude BINDING in 1997. He is survived by his brother Bob (Karen) of Winnipeg, their three children, Rob, Dave and Kathy (Dave) and his grandniece Anika, and cousins in Canada and Switzerland. Fred was born and raised in Winnipeg and holds degrees from the University of Manitoba. He graduated with a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kansas and began his teaching career at Memorial University in Saint John's, Newfoundland in 1996. In 1971, he began teaching at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo and retired from that position in June, 2003. He was Marshall of the University and Dean of Greek Life. Fred was active in the Kitchener-Waterloo community with the Pioneer Sportsmen Club as Builder, President and Director, with Special Olympics and the Bruce Trail Association as well as many other groups in the area. He was also very involved with International Competitive Shooting as a competitor, official and manager. He participated in Olympic, Commonwealth and Pan American Games, Canadian National and Provincial Championships. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held at First United Church, 16 William Street at King Street, Waterloo, at 11 a.m. on Monday, August 11, 2003. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Fred's memory to Ontario's Special Olympics Inc., K-W and District Special Olympics or the Pioneer Sportsmen Club, 211 Pioneer Tower Road, Kitchener, or the charity of your choice and may be arranged by calling the Edward R. Good Funeral Home at 519-745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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STADNISKY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Joan HANER (née BOCK)
After a courageous struggle with cancer on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at the age of 68.
Beloved wife of Harold for 25 years. Cherished mother of Jim STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Debbie,) Bud STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Debbie WHALEN (Terry), Lorrie STADNISKY (Steve), Heather BOUCHARD (Eric), Shelley SAGHAFI (Abdi), Kevin STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Liz) and Pamela BORETZ.
Loving grandmother of 27 and great grandmother of 21. Sister of Ruth STEELE (Jim,) Rosella HARRISON (Orville) and Evelyn TARABAS (Pete.) Daughter of the late Ernest and stepdaughter of Frances BOCK. Aunt to several nieces and nephews. Friends called the Arthur Funeral Home and Cremation Centre on Friday, May 30, 2003. The funeral service was held on Saturday May 31 with Reverend Phil MILLER officiating. Interment Greenwood Cemetery.

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STAHL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
Harry David (Butch) FREEDHOFF
By Alex STAHL Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - Page A32
Husband, father, grandfather, executive, athlete. Born November 14, 1938, in Toronto. Died May 4, 2002, of Lou Gehrig's disease, aged 63.
To his face, it was almost never Harry. Born redheaded to Anne and Ben, he weighed a sinister 35 pounds after one year, which prompted the lifetime nickname "Butch, " often becoming "Butchie" because of his likeable nature.
His physicality developed early. Anne, a ranked tennis player, and Ben, also ranked, as well as a Hockley Valley Ski Club co-founder, taught him the skills and instilled gritty determination, concentration and self-discipline. He won the Telegram Tennis Tournament at 9; for the next five decades, he ranked among the top of his peer-group at the provincial and national levels. He represented Canada as a 1955 Junior Davis Cup participant, in the 1961 and 1965 Maccabiah Games and during the 1982 Senior World Team Championships.
That early family closeness never left Butch. After first meeting his future wife, Sandra STONE, movie-like, he predicted their fate together to a friend. Married in 1963, Sandy and Butch soon brought Richard and Marla into their lives. In the 1990s, daughter-in-law Meredith and granddaughter Merritt extended and intensified family life.
Butch had compensated for his lack of academic interest with his competitive nature and love of interaction with people. After seven years in high school, his career as an outstanding marketer started ignominiously: from a $50-a-week stockbroker, he became a manufacturer's agent for children's wear. He was later president at Charan Toys, where he triumphed by securing the North American rights to Batman action figures. After a tour with Tyco Toys and Sega Canada, his career culminated in 1994 with Sony Computer Entertainment Canada. There he was instrumental in leading the marketing of Sony's Playstation platforms.
The mark of any man is the character displayed in the face of adversity. Butch dealt with any setback with a touch of philosophy, objectivity and humanity. If his opponent played better, it was acknowledged (and then Butch worked out harder on his machines). If business life proved impossible (such as entrepreneurial bankruptcy on the eve of his son's bar mitzvah), Butch discovered a new source for joke-making, and then another, better job. When his mother developed Parkinson's disease, he became even more devoted.
When personal or professional successes occurred, his spontaneous speechmaking allowed him to openly share his joy with family, Friends and colleagues. His audiences quickly learned to expect hilarious anecdotes, followed by insightful and heartfelt truths that everyone found entertaining and endearing. If his words were persuasive, his actions spoke even louder. Generous and hospitable to virtual strangers (when his condo's doorman couldn't obtain immigration permits for his family in Somalia, Butch spontaneously found and paid for the professional help to make the reunion happen), Butch and Sandy opened their doors and lives to many.
I learned of Butch's affliction on 9/11. Whereas athletics and business offer future opportunities and hope for improvement, the verdict of Lou Gehrig's disease does not. Last March, with his family and close Friends, I spent a week with him in Florida during that time, physical changes were heartbreakingly noticeable. But he regaled us, then as always and until the end, with his comic genius, memory and insightfulness, regularly scrawling one-liners on his writing board and delivering his smiling, nodding, thumbs-up optimism. In body, mind and soul, he remains with me as a mensch to the core, who lived on the high and through the low -- an example to emulate.
Butch's friend Alex wrote this with Butch's wife Sandy and other family members.

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STAINES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-16 published
Jerome Hamilton BUCKLEY
Husband, father, professor. Born August 30, 1917, in Toronto. Died January 28 in Cambridge, Massachusetts., of natural causes, aged 85.
By Margaret ATWOOD and David STAINES, Page A24
Every American Thanksgiving, Jerry and Elizabeth Buckley would invite at least one of Terry's graduate students to their home in Belmont, Massachusetts., for the customary turkey dinner. (In the 1960s, the graduate student was Margaret ATWOOD; in the '70s, David STAINES.) There, surrounded by their three children, Nicholas, Victoria, and Eleanor, and other guests, Jerry would regale everyone with tales of Puritan ancestors, though they were not "his" ancestors both Jerry and Elizabeth were born and raised in Toronto, and they were distinctly Canadian in their gracious manners, their widespread generosity, and their affections. At a large institution such as Harvard, Jerry stood out for his kindness and humanity.
Jerry attended Humberside Collegiate Institute and then Victoria College in the University of Toronto, where his courses included Elizabethan literature offered by Northrop FRYE and Shakespeare offered by E. J. PRATT. As a young poet and critic, he reviewed new works by Robinson Jeffers and Virginia Woolf, and won a prize for an essay titled New Techniques in Contemporary Fiction. Graduating with a B.A. in 1939, he chose Harvard Graduate School, obtaining his PhD in 1942. On June 19, 1943, in Toronto, he married Elizabeth ADAM/ADAMS, his confidante and soul mate.
University teaching posts were thin on the ground in Canada during the Second World War. Jerry used to describe his one job interview with a Canadian university: They were less interested in his a academic credentials, he said, than in whether he was a Christian and whether he drank. If he did the latter, they made it clear that he must do it with the curtains closed so as not to corrupt the students. He took a job in the United States.
His teaching career took him to the University of Wisconsin, where he rose from instructor in 1942 to full professor in 1954 to Columbia University from 1954 until 1961; and to Harvard University, where he taught for 26 years 1987. Named Gurney Professor of English Literature in 1975, in this distinguished chair he followed Douglas BUSH and B. J. Whiting; BUSH, another ex-Canadian, welcomed Jerry BUCKLEY to Harvard, as Jerry recollected, "with open arrns... filled with theses."
A Harvard seminar on Victorian critics led by Howard Mumford Jones prodded Buckley's interest in William Ernest Henley, and his dissertation on Henley became his first published book, William Ernest Henley: A Study in the Counter-Decadence of the Nineties (1945). In 1951 he secured his reputation as a major Victorianist with The Victorian Temper, and in 1960 he re-established Tennyson's stature in literary studies with his Tennyson: The Growth of a Poet. The rise of Victorian studies owes very much to his dedicated scholarship and his inspiring leadership.
He was passionately devoted to his subject, so much so that he often seemed to become the incarnation of it. Former students remember with affection riveting oral performances of his favourite authors, such as Dickens. Striding across the room, long arms waving, he would "become" Mr. Micawber or Ebenezer Scrooge. His performances would be interspersed with strange bits of gossip, which he would also act out, becoming Tennyson at an advanced age, creeping around behind an alarmed woman at a garden party to inform her that her stays were creaking, or reciting with verve and relish one of Edward Lear's parodies of his beloved Tennyson. Many of Terry's former graduate students were at his funeral to pay tribute to a superb humanist and an equally superb friend.
Margaret ATWOOD and David STAINES were among Jerry BUCKLEY's graduate students.

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STAIRS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
STANFIELD, Katherine Margaret (née STAIRS)
Died peacefully December 26, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born February 1, 1918, eldest of Katherine (DRYSDALE) and Cyril W. STAIRS, Halifax, she attended Halifax Ladies College, Edgehill and the Halifax Business College before working at Wm. Stairs son and Morrow. She married Gordon (Pete) STANFIELD in 1940. They resided in Sydney and New Glasgow before settling in Halifax, summering in Bedford and vacationing in Bermuda. Kay will be remembered as a people person who made a life long contribution to her community through her many interests and activities as a member of the Waegwaltic and Saraguay Clubs, the Junior League, All Saints Cathedral, Victoria Hall and the garden club. She is survived by sisters: Phyllis (MacDOUGALL) Toronto, Doshie (MacKIMMIE- KAUMEYER) Calgary, Betty (FREUND) Johannesburg, South Africa and brother Allan STAIRS, Montreal: daughters Nancy and Pegi, Calgary; sons David (Barbara) Halifax and Gordon (Kay), Dartmouth; grand_sons Peter (Karin SORRA), New Jersey, Michael, Vancouver, John (Julie) Calgary, David K and Matthew, Halifax; great grand_son William, New Jersey. She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years (1995) and brother Arthur STAIRS, Halifax. The family is most grateful for the care and support given to Kay by the staff and Friends at Melville Heights, her home since 1995. The family will receive visitors at Snows Funeral Home, Windsor Street, Halifax on Monday December 29 from 7-9: 00 p.m. The funeral service will be at All Saints Cathedral, Tuesday, December 30, 1:30 p.m.

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STAITE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
STAITE, Philip Edward, O.D.
Peacefully on Saturday, March 1, 2003, at St. Joseph's Health Centre, in his 80th year, after a long and courageous battle with Parkinson's disease. He is survived by his devoted wife of 55 years, Margaret (née ALEXANDER,) and loving children, Peggy (Rob), Patty (Noel) and Philip (Elizabeth). Dear grandfather of Jennifer, Michael, David, Benjamin, Timothy, Katelyn, Victoria and Philip Anthony. Funeral Service will held at St. George's on-the-Hill, 4600 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (W. of Royal York Road) on Thursday, March 6, 2003 at 11 a.m. Memorial donations can be made to the Parkinson's Foundation of Canada or the charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 416-767-3153.

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STALEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
Mary Catharine JONES (née STALEY) Died 3 August 2003
Peacefully, in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, at home surrounded by her loving family.
She gave unending, unconditional love and encouragement to her children and their spouses: Sharon GLOVER (Douglas WILKINS) of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia; Christopher JONES (Susan) of Dartmouth; and also to her deeply beloved grandchildren: Jason (Alessandra) of L'Aquila, Italy; Nicholas (Erin); and Jennifer of Dartmouth.
Mum was predeceased by her loving and beloved husband Owen in She is survived by her dearest sister Barbara MANNING of Ottawa.
She leaves us a rich legacy: love, courage, common sense, acceptance and a zest for life that was never-ending. She is deeply cherished by all of us who loved her, and she will be held in our hearts and minds forever.

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STAMFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
STAMFORD, Ross
Died peacefully, on Friday, June 27, 2003, at York Central Hospital. He is survived by his wife Joan, children Cynthia (McCORMACK,) Brenda (BREWER,) Scott (Diana MARTIN,) Pamela, and grandchildren Kristin, Kimberlee, Jamie, Laurel, Veronica, Nicole, Lindsay and Christine. The family would like to thank the staff on the 3rd Floor at York Central Hospital for all their care and support. Donations may be made to the Childrens' Wish Foundation or the Herbie Fund, c/o The Hospital for Sick Children.

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STANBURY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-29 published
STANBURY, Helen Gove
A Memorial Service for the late Helen STANBURY, who died at Fairhaven Home, Peterborough, on February 16, 2003, will be held at St. John's Anglican Church, 99 Brock Street, Peterborough, on Saturday, May 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. (Parking located on Brock Street).

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STANBURY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-11 published
STANBURY, Amadita Diana Oland Halifax (née OLAND)
Died peacefully at her family home on August 9, 2003 after a long and courageous battle with breast cancer. Born a twin on Easter Sunday, 1918 in Guildford, England, she was the only daughter of the late Colonel Sidney C. OLAND and Herlinda deBedia OLAND. Following World War 1, she lived in Havana, Cuba, Halifax and later in Hollywood, where both her parents were in motion pictures.
Upon her return to Nova Scotia, she attended the Convent of the Sacred Heart and then Mount Saint Vincent Academy and has enjoyed her affiliations with both schools ever since. She was also educated abroad in Lausanne, Paris and London. One of her passions was riding horses, where she excelled and won various awards both in Halifax. Still remembered as a significant social event, her marriage to Norman STANBURY in July 1938 took place on the first sunny day following six weeks of rain. On its front page, above a wedding photo, the Halifax Herald ran a huge banner ''Happy the Bride the Sun Shines On''. The sun continued to shine for over 50 years of marriage.
She joined the Junior League and loved her work in the Well Baby Clinic, During her lifetime of dedication to raising her family, she was active in her support of the Arts including the Canadian Opera Company, the London Theatre Company, the Kiwanis Music Festival and numerous local theatre companies including Neptune Theatre She was knowledgeable about and gained great pleasure from her study of antiques.
As a alumna of Mount Saint Vincent, she was Chair of their Project One-Futures for Women fund raising campaign and was among the first to receive the University Alumnae Award of Distinction.
She is survived by her six children - Penelope (Barry RUSSELL,) Michael, and Lindita (Charles WALKER) all of Halifax; Bruce and Christopher (Asifa BHATIA) of Vancouver, Norman, Toronto; also eight grandchildren-Charles (Loraine TOBIA,) Paul (Dawna BEARISTO) and Dick RUSSELL, Susannah and Katherine STANBURY, Roland STANBURY and Diana and Charles WALKER; three great-grandchildren and two and two step great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her twin brother, Bruce S. OLAND, Halifax , and many cousins, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Norman, and two brothers, Victor deBedia and Don Jamie.
Visitation will be at Snows Funeral Home from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated by Reverend Gordon MacLEAN at Canadian Martyrs Church, 5900 Inglis Street, Halifax at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 13. A private family burial service will be held later at Santa Maria del Pilar Chapel, Sackville, Nova Scotia. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Nova Scotia Division of the Canadian Breast Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. On line condolences snow@funeralscanada.com

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STANFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
STANFIELD, The Right Honourable Robert Lorne
Born in Truro, Nova Scotia April 11, 1914. Died of pneumonia at the Montfort Hospital, in Ottawa December 16, 2003. Loving husband of Anne. Father of Sarah NYLAND, Max STANFIELD, Judy and Mimi STANFIELD and their families. Stepfather of Bill and Laurie AUSTIN and their families. Grandfather of fifteen, great-grandfather of two. Private funeral service in Ottawa followed by family burial service in Halifax. Flowers gratefully declined.

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STANFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Party leaders pay tribute
Tories fondly remember Stanfield as best prime minister Canada never had
By Kim LUNMAN and Drew FAGAN, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Ottawa -- Robert Lorne STANFIELD, the former leader of the federal Progressive Conservatives, was remembered yesterday as a Canadian icon.
Political tributes were made across the country for Mr. STANFIELD, who died Tuesday at the Montfort Hospital in Ottawa. He was 89.
He had been in poor health for several years after a stroke. A private funeral will be held in Ottawa tomorrow and a family burial in Halifax.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had. In later years, he was regarded as the conscience of the Conservatives, representing their progressive side on social issues.
"Today we mourn the passing of one of the most distinguished and committed Canadians of the past half-century," said Prime Minister Paul MARTIN. "I, like other Canadians, fondly remember Mr. STANFIELD's great warmth, humility and compassionate nature, but also his intellect and humour."
Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Mr. STANFIELD will be remembered as an icon.
"It's a very sad and poignant day. He had a larger-than-life persona and I think he can be accurately described as an icon in Conservative politics and Canadian politics," Mr. MacKAY said.
"Conservatives across the country, and indeed all Canadians, have lost a great leader and a great Canadian," Canadian Alliance Leader Stephen HARPER said.
In an interview yesterday, former prime minister Brian MULRONEY described Mr. STANFIELD as having brought the Progressive Conservative Party into the mainstream of modern Canadian life through his support for the Official Languages Act and his openness to ethnic minorities and diversity. Mr. MULRONEY said it was appropriate that Mr. STANFIELD had been receiving treatment at Montfort Hospital, the French-language facility in Ottawa, considering how hard he had worked as leader to make the Tories comfortable with bilingualism and how much effort he himself had made to learn French. "He was a strikingly impressive, quiet, thoughtful man, but who was very resolved and determined -- and with a generous view of Canada," Mr. MULRONEY said.
When Mr. MULRONEY was prime minister from 1984 to 1993, he would occasionally invite Mr. STANFIELD to 24 Sussex Dr. for lunch. Mr. MULRONEY revealed yesterday that, in the late 1980s, when Mr. STANFIELD was almost 75, he offered him the post of Canadian ambassador to the United Nations.
"He thought it was a great honour. He wrestled with it for a little while, but decided that, though he would love to do it, he thought it would be a bit much at that stage of his life," Mr. MULRONEY said.
"He brought compassion to politics," Nova Scotia's Premier John HAMM said yesterday.
"He brought a love of his country to his politics."
Flora MacDONALD, a former federal Tory cabinet minister, first worked with Mr. STANFIELD during the 1956 provincial campaign that made him Nova Scotia premier. "He set a very high standard for himself as a politician and expected others to do the same," she said yesterday. Mr. STANFIELD supported official bilingualism and abolition of the death penalty when his other caucus colleagues were strongly opposed, she said. "He didn't do things just because they were popular. He did things because he thought they were intrinsically right."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON said Mr. STANFIELD "will be remembered for his integrity, his devotion to his country, his social conscience and especially for his wit and sense of humour."
Mr. STANFIELD was premier of Nova Scotia from 1956 to 1967. He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics, first provincially and later on the federal stage. But his awkward image contrasted sharply to that of the hip, telegenic Mr. TRUDEAU, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership. The 1972 election was Mr. STANFIELD's closest brush with federal power, when the Liberals narrowly defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats. Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He remained as leader until Joe CLARK succeeded him in 1976.
After relinquishing his seat in the Commons in 1979, Mr. STANFIELD became Canada's special envoy to the Middle East and North Africa until 1980, and was chairman of the Commonwealth Foundation from 1987 to 1991.
He married three times. His first wife died in a car crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.

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STANFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Nova Scotians proudly recall a political icon
By Kevin COX, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Halifax -- To many Canadians, Robert STANFIELD was a hard-luck opposition leader in the wrong place at the wrong time, but in his home province, he inspired fierce pride as a political icon.
Yesterday, the flags flew at half-mast at Province House, where he served four terms as premier from 1956-1967, and mourners signed a book of condolences for Mr. STANFIELD, who died in Ottawa at 89 on Tuesday.
"Robert STANFIELD brought a remarkable understanding of our country based on respect, strength and civility that was, and is, missing in public life," Premier John HAMM said yesterday. Mr. HAMM's low-key country style has been compared to that of Mr. STANFIELD. "We will always wonder how Canada would have moved forward with Robert STANFIELD as prime minister."
Colleagues remembered him as a compassionate, honest and decent leader who reluctantly entered partisan politics in 1949 to rebuild the Progressive Conservative Party after it had been shut out in the provincial election three years earlier.
He took the unusual step of refusing to attack the governing Liberals under long-time premier Angus L. MacDONALD, and instead chose to build up the Tory organization, which would dominate the province for decades.
He overcame the tragic death of his first wife, Joyce, in a car crash in 1954 and took the Conservatives to power two years later.
Senator John BUCHANAN, who was Nova Scotia premier for 13 years, recalled campaigning as a political rookie under Mr. STANFIELD's banner in 1967.
"Bob STANFIELD was a household name in this province. In my constituency, I would meet people I had never known before and they'd look at the badge I was wearing and say, 'Good, you're a STANFIELD man.'"
Mr. STANFIELD's folksy, earnest manner, coupled with an often self-deprecating dry wit, disguised an ambitious reform program that he brought to the economically depressed Atlantic province with a tradition of political patronage.
Under Mr. STANFIELD, the Tories undertook sweeping education changes, building several new schools, introducing vocational institutions and providing more funds for universities.
But his most controversial move was to establish one of the first provincial economic development agencies in Canada -- Industrial Estates Ltd. -- to attract industry to the province.
Entrepreneurs including grocer Frank SOBEY signed on to provide provincial money to bring businesses to Nova Scotia.
The agency had a couple of embarrassing failures that cost the government millions of dollars, but also created thousands of jobs.
Mr. BUCHANAN also spoke of Mr. STANFIELD's calm demeanour.
The senator recalled Mr. STANFIELD placidly watching in a Halifax curling club as the results came in from the 1972 election when the tally was seesawing and jubilant supporters believed that he would become prime minister.
"About 11 p.m., he just decided that he and his wife would go back to the hotel and they were going to get a good night's rest and see what would happen the next day," Mr. BUCHANAN recalled.
The next morning, Mr. STANFIELD found out the Liberals had won the election by two seats.
The homespun, Lincolnesque qualities that endeared Mr. STANFIELD to Nova Scotians were no match for the emotional Trudeaumania that swept the country in the 1968 election campaign.

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STANFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
Ottawa bids STANFIELD goodbye
'He was a sage.... He was quite extraordinary,' Charest says at funeral
By Kim LUNMAN, Saturday, December 20, 2003 - Page A9
Ottawa -- Robert STANFIELD was fondly remembered yesterday as a sage statesman.
The former Nova Scotia premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader remained one of the country's most respected politicians even years after leaving the national arena, Tory Senator Lowell MURRAY told more than 100 mourners yesterday at Mr. STANFIELD's funeral in Ottawa.
"There has survived perhaps only the kernel of something, but its essence in the Canadian consciousness -- that once, uniquely, there was STANFIELD, leader of a major party, a man of such civility, such humanity, such integrity, who adorned our national life," Mr. MURRAY said
Mr. STANFIELD, who suffered a stroke several years ago, died Tuesday in Ottawa. He was 89.
At the private ceremony at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, he was remembered as a respected politician with a dry wit. He will be buried today in Halifax's Camp Hill cemetery.
Politicians of all stripes attended the service to pay tribute. Outside the church, Prime Minister Paul MARTIN told reporters his father and Mr. STANFIELD were "great Friends. My father had huge admiration for Mr. STANFIELD. And I actually shudder to think what the two of them are doing up there right now, the amount of discussions that are going on."
Mr. MARTIN said he remembered Mr. STANFIELD for his "great sense of decency, integrity, and his deep, deep love of country." Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Canada has lost "one of its greatest statesmen, a person who raised the standard of politics and public service.... He was very much substance over style."
"He was a sage," Quebec Liberal Premier Jean Charest, the former federal Tory leader, said. Mr. STANFIELD "looked at life with a bit of a smile, I think. He was quite extraordinary."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON called Mr. STANFIELD remarkable, "a man of deep conviction, a man who was decent and fair and honest and very funny." Other political colleagues at the funeral included former Tory prime ministers Kim CAMPBELL and Joe CLARK and former Tory cabinet minister Flora MacDONALD.
Mr. STANFIELD married three times. His first wife died in a crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.
Even as the service was going on in Ottawa, hundreds of people filed into the Nova Scotia legislature in Halifax to sign a book of condolence next to a portrait of the former premier, who led the province for 11 years, from 1956 to 1967.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had.
In his later years, he was regarded as the Conservatives' conscience, representing the party's progressive side on social issues. He supported Mr. TRUDEAU's Official Languages Act despite a revolt by his fellow Tory members of parliament and also backed abolishing the death penalty.
He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics.
Bespectacled and known for his slow-speaking style, Mr. STANFIELD conveyed an awkward image that contrasted sharply with the youthful, charismatic Mr. Trudeau, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership.
But he came within two seats of office in the 1972 election when the Liberals defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats.
Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He was succeeded by Mr. CLARK in 1976.

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STANFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
STANFIELD, Katherine Margaret (née STAIRS)
Died peacefully December 26, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born February 1, 1918, eldest of Katherine (DRYSDALE) and Cyril W. STAIRS, Halifax, she attended Halifax Ladies College, Edgehill and the Halifax Business College before working at Wm. Stairs son and Morrow. She married Gordon (Pete) STANFIELD in 1940. They resided in Sydney and New Glasgow before settling in Halifax, summering in Bedford and vacationing in Bermuda. Kay will be remembered as a people person who made a life long contribution to her community through her many interests and activities as a member of the Waegwaltic and Saraguay Clubs, the Junior League, All Saints Cathedral, Victoria Hall and the garden club. She is survived by sisters: Phyllis (MacDOUGALL) Toronto, Doshie (MacKIMMIE- KAUMEYER) Calgary, Betty (FREUND) Johannesburg, South Africa and brother Allan STAIRS, Montreal: daughters Nancy and Pegi, Calgary; sons David (Barbara) Halifax and Gordon (Kay), Dartmouth; grand_sons Peter (Karin SORRA), New Jersey, Michael, Vancouver, John (Julie) Calgary, David K and Matthew, Halifax; great grand_son William, New Jersey. She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years (1995) and brother Arthur STAIRS, Halifax. The family is most grateful for the care and support given to Kay by the staff and Friends at Melville Heights, her home since 1995. The family will receive visitors at Snows Funeral Home, Windsor Street, Halifax on Monday December 29 from 7-9: 00 p.m. The funeral service will be at All Saints Cathedral, Tuesday, December 30, 1:30 p.m.

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STANLEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
John Ellsworth SEABROOK
In loving memory of John Ellsworth SEABROOK July 18, 1923 to November 30, 2003.
John Ellsworth SEABROOK, known as "Jack" passed away suddenly at 80 years, on November 30, 2003.
He was born in Chatsworth, July 18, 1923 and made his home in Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, since 1931. He leaves to remember him, his beloved wife Marion. His cherished kids: Cathy, Deb, John, Diana, Mark and Vanda. Their spouses: David, Cheryl, Keith and Michelle. His treasured grandchildren: Brent, Brady, Logan, Meg, Kate, Sarah, Jenny, Ben, Philip, A.J., Josh, Lyric, Jasmine, Morgan and Jessie. His one beautiful great grandchild Teigan. His sisters: Ella (Peggy) HAHN and Lois CHALLINOR. Predeceased Maxine PRINGLE and Fern SEABROOK. His brother, Archie. Predeceased Bill. His sisters-in-law: Joanne
SMITH, Millie SEABROOK and Aletha SEABROOK. Predeceased Lorene STANLEY. His brothers-in-law: Jim HAHN, Jim SMITH and George STANLEY. Predeceased Hugh PRINGLE. His nieces and nephews: Clay, Susan, Bill, Beth, Robert, Paul, David, Charlie, John, Geoff, Mark, Kevin and Tara. Predeceased Lynn. All will miss him dearly. He was an original. He realized his own dreams of becoming a machinist, a master mechanic, a carpenter, the developer of the Brookwood Brae Golf Course, windmill designer, gentleman farmer (all animals at his farm died of old age) and curator and creator of Jack's Agriculture Museum. We all knew and loved him and he became our example to follow our dreams. His colourful, warm character shone at auctions, plays, card games, and church committees. He was the crank shaft and spark plug of our family. He loved Massey Harris tractors, Triumph motorcycles, Blue Jay games, yellow wooden shoes, novels by Louis L'Amour, movies with John Wayne, grape juice and certo (for arthritis), raisin pie and ice cream - and us!
"Everyday you're breathin' is a good day." This philosophy was reflected in his love for his wife, his kids, his grandkids, his Friends and his community. His love will shine in those he's left behind. Friends called the Mindemoya United Church on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, December 4, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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STANLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
KELK, Margaret Emma (née POPE)
Peacefully on February 26, 2003, in her 86th year, at Dufferin Oaks Nursing Home in Shelburne, Ontario. Dear wife of the late Gordon Henry KELK. Beloved mother of Judith BRODIE of Grand Cayman and Jayne STANLEY of Shelburne. Loving sister of Mary Elaine UNWIN of Vancouver, British Columbia. Sadly missed by five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Thanks to the staff of Dufferin Oaks Nursing Home for their kind and patient care over the past eleven years. Cremation has taken care. A small family service was held in Shelburne. Donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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STANLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-14 published
Died This Day -- 16th Earl of Derby, 1908
Saturday, June 14, 2003 - Page F10
British politician and vice-regent born Frederick Arthur STANLEY in London on January 15, 1841; followed father into politics (three times British prime minister); 1865, elected to Parliament 1886, took seat in House of Lords; 1888, named governor-general of Canada; strong advocate of closer ties between Great Britain and dominions; publicly shy and politically careful; primarily remembered for 1883 donation of Stanley Cup to annually honour Canadian hockey champion "in a fair and uniform manner; " 1883, retired and returned home; died at Holwood, England.

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STANTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
LATIMER, Robert E. (Retired as Assistant Deputy Minister of Trade Policy- Department of External Affairs, Served as Minister of Economics at the Canadian High Commission in London, England and for many years was a Senior Trade and Economic Official in the Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce)
Suddenly at his residence, Kingston on Saturday, March 1, 2003. Bob LATIMER, in his 79th year. Beloved Husband of Eleanor STANTON. Dear father of Kevin (Lori) of Kingston and Shelley of St. Catharines. Predeceased by sister, Elspeth LATIMER, and brothers, Jack, Jim and Bill LATIMER. Also, survived by sisters-in-law, Mary and Margaret LATIMER and brother-in-law, Ralph (Mary) STANTON. Sadly missed by Nick and Katy. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews. The family will receive Friends at the Scotland Funeral Home, 27 Main Street, Elgin (613) 359-5555) on Wednesday, March 5th after 12 noon followed by a Memorial Service in the Chapel at 1 o'; clock. Inturment Olivet Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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STANTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
DALGLEISH, Gordon John
Peacefully in his son's arms, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on March 4, 2003. Dear husband and best friend of Suzanne (née MORRISON) and devoted father of Cameron and Suzanne Jane. Beloved brother-in-law of Sheila COLLINS and dear uncle of Catherine and Julie CIEPLY. Best buddy to MacTavish. Gord cherished the many Friends he made throughout his life. Gord's family deeply appreciates the care, love and Friendship of cardiologist Dr. Donald PEAT, Dr. Bruce MERRICK, Dr. Tom STANTON and nurses Nancy DAHMER and Patti FRANKLIN gave him so generously. For many years Gord was an enthusiastic member of the Canadian Ski Patrol, Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance and he was a ski instructor at Mansfield Skiways. Friends will be received at Saint John's United Church, 262 Randall Street, Oakville, (905) 845-0551, on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 11 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 12 p.m. Reception to follow the funeral service. Burial to take place at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery, Oakville. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart Function Clinic at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

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STAPLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
LAMONT, Katharine Johnston,
M.A. (Oxon.)
On Wednesday, February 19, 2003, in her 98th year. Beloved daughter of the Honorable John Henderson LAMONT, Supreme Court of Canada, and Margaret Murray JOHNSTON; predeceased by her brother Duncan Cameron. Miss LAMONT was head of the History Department at The Bishop Strachan School in Toronto (1930-1952), and Principal of The Study in Montreal (1952-1970). She will be remembered with pride, affection, respect and gratitude, by hundreds of former students, and by her surviving cousins, Jane MONTGOMERY of St. Catharines, Katherine STAPLES of Napanee, Elizabeth McLEOD of Toronto, and their families. Memorial donations may be made to Save the Children, Canada, 4141 Yonge Street, Toronto M2P 2A6, or the Katharine Lamont Bursary, The Bishop Strachan School, 298 Lonsdale Road, Toronto M4V 1X2. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto, on March 3, at 1: 30 p.m.

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STARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
LITTLE, Alexander Ross
Ross died peacefully at home on July 25, 2003. Born November 15, 1908 in Woodstock Ontario, he is predeceased by parents Henry Alexander LITTLE and Emily Christina (née ROSS,) and his only brother Jim LITTLE (Lillian) of London, Ontario. Ross is survived by his wife of 65 years, Helen and their children: Christy; Peter (Noreen) of Owen Sound and their children Marion (Ted HODSON,) Martha (Eric TIISLER,) Alexander (Kim STARK,) Heather and Christopher Andrew of Calgary; and Ron (Cath) of Calgary and their children Jane and Jim; and by five great-grandchildren.
Childhood at Altadore, his family home in Woodstock and many years at Lakefield Preparatory School were followed by Ridley College School, Trinity College (U of T), (Beta Theta Pi) Osgoode Hall, membership in the Law Society of Upper Canada and work with the Canada Permanent Trust Company. Ross married Helen (SHUTTLEWORTH) on April 14, 1938 in London, Ontario then served as an Royal Canadian Air Force Wing Commander during World War 2. Rejoining the Permanent, he became Winnipeg Branch Manager from 1945 until his retirement in 1972.
Volunteer commitments: The Canadian Disaster Relief Fund, Trustee of the Winnipeg School Board District 1, Save the Children Canada, figure skating judge, the Crescentwood Home Owners Association, the Men's Musical Club, Kiwanis and St. George's Anglican Church - Building Committee, Warden, Vestry and 50 year member of the Choir.
Favorite pastimes: singing, piano, painting with Helen and Canadian history through the Champlain Society and Hudson's Bay Record Society, travels with Helen and Christy, a life time of golf including many years at St. Charles Golf and Country Club and ice dancing at the Winnipeg Winter Club with Helen.
An exemplary citizen, wonderful father and truly gentle man, he will be dearly missed.
Memorial service: Saturday August 2 at 11:00 a.m., St. George's Anglican Crescentwood, 168 Wilton Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3M 3C3.
In lieu of flowers: the St. George's Memorial Fund c/o the Church, Kiwanis Club of Winnipeg Foundation Inc. 430 Webb Place Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 3J7, the Winnipeg Art Gallery 300 Memorial Blvd., Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 1V1 or Save the Children Canada, 4141 Yonge Street, Suite 300 Toronto, Ontario M2P 2A8.

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STARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
Robert Wray STARK
By Randy PENNEY, Wednesday, October 29, 2003 - Page A22
Father, grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, businessman. Born November 3, 1914, in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. Died August 7, in Renfrew, Ontario, aged 89.
Every once in a while, someone comes into our lives who truly makes a difference. In my case, and I suspect for many in the town of Renfrew, Ontario, Bob STARK was one of those individuals. He was in so many ways a perfect gentleman.
Bob had many loves in his life. First and foremost, Bob loved his family, starting with his wife, Marjory. They were married for 54 years and enjoyed a wonderful marriage. They were a perfect couple, had the opportunity to travel the world, and truly enjoyed each other.
When it came to his two sons, Murray and Stewart, Bob would say he was lucky. He often said he wasn't sure when it happened but, at some point, the boys stopped being his sons and became his Friends. Bob cherished his time with his sons and looked forward to their phone calls and frequent visits.
When it came to his extended family, Bob would simply smile and say they had taught him so much. This was a huge compliment coming from someone who knew as much as Bob did.
Bob loved his camp at Hurds Lake. He would often say that he could literally feel his blood pressure drop as he began the slow drive along Pucker Street to the lake. Bob cherished the Ottawa Valley.
His second love had to be the town of Renfrew. He came from a generation where, if you possessed a knowledge or skill, it was expected you would give back to your community. In Bob's particular case, his motivation was more personal. Bob's father passed away when Bob was only 12 and Bob would say the community played a large part in his upbringing. The community helped to raise him and he wanted to give back.
He was an honorary member of the Rotary Club, a past president and a Paul Harris Fellow. Bob had a special place in his heart for Camp Merrywood and chaired their fundraising committee.
He served on the board of the Victorian Order of Nurses and St. John's Ambulance. He was a member of the Renfrew Chamber of Commerce. He chaired the finance committee of Trinity St. Andrew's United Church. He was a founding member of the Renfrew Industrial Commission and Renfrew's first industrial commissioner. In 1993, Bob was named Citizen of the Year for the Town of Renfrew.
Bob's greatest love, in the volunteer sector, was his involvement with the Renfrew Victoria Hospital. It was there in the board room where Bob STARK was a natural. His business skill, sense of decency and concern for all employees and physicians shone through. Under his guidance, the hospital has grown from a $7-million corporation in 1990 to a $22-million organization with more than 450 staff and physicians. Through the years, Bob served on all committees at the hospital and was chairman of the board of trustees from 1989 to 1992. Bob was also a past member of the board of directors of the Ontario Hospital Association.
Bob believed passionately that corporate success includes corporate responsibility: to employees, physicians, patients, suppliers, and the community.
Perhaps Bob's greatest achievement at the hospital was his vision to establish the Renfrew Victoria Hospital Foundation. Through this charity, close to $10-million has been raised for equipment and services. Bob was the founding chairman of the foundation and served on its board from 1989 until 2003.
Bob never wavered in his commitment to maintain the highest standards of honesty and integrity in his professional life, his community work and his personal life.
Randy PENNEY is Bob STARK's friend and Chief Executive Officer of the Renfrew Victoria Hospital.

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STARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
Sara STARK (Sarika)
By Peter STARK, Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, Serb, snack-bar administrator. Born September 19, 1925, in Subotica, Yugoslavia. Died September 21, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 78.
Back in 1997, I took my mother back to Belgrade. We arrived midday and, to pass some time, we went to a piac (market). Strolling around, mother spotted a stall that had a chicken in a pot of water. "How much for the chicken?" she asked in Serbian. "Twenty a kilo and she's two kilos!" the well-sauced proprietor answered. Now Sara was a country girl and knew a bird when she saw one: "Why you liar! That chicken is the size of a pigeon and is less than a kilo!" The farmer stirred, picked up on our Western clothing and launched into a verbal assault. Quickly others stepped in. What a scene! Less than half-an-hour on the ground and my mother had found a battle -- but she was never one to back down.
Sara, or Sarika as she was known to the villagers of Zitiste, was the only daughter of the wealthy WEBERs -- Moijse and Nina and the granddaughter of family matriarch, Malvina HAJDUSKA.
Sara grew up in privileged surroundings, yet her upbringing included some stern lessons in individuality and self-reliance: From the age of 11, she was expected to produce butter and sell it in the village for her pocket money. Perhaps that's why the residents of Plandiste (where the family owned a second farm) met her with such joy in 1997. Not having seen her for 55 years they had no problem recognizing her and came running shouting, "Sarika! Sarika!"
Back in 1942, at the age of 17, Sara, along with Nina and Malvina, were moved to the Jewish ghetto in Subotica. Deported to Bacalmas in 1943 they were later sent to Strasshof, Austria, where they worked 15-hour days on the land. At season's end, they were put on a train for Auschwitz but over-crowding there forced the re-routing of the train to Bergen-Belsen. Later, they were transferred to Theresienstadt, where Sara met Alex. At war's end, she, Alex and Nina (Malvina had died on the day of liberation) went on foot to Budapest.
In Budapest, Sara and Alex were married and had three children: Robert (1946), Peter (1948), and Judy (1950).
Life was not easy. Alex's father, Aladar, had a small shoe store and provided them with stock to sell in country markets. On market days, Sara and Alex rose at 3 a.m. to load a truck and head out with other vendors. Regardless of the difficulty in making a living, Sara insisted that her children receive the best: they were immaculately dressed in their weekend whites, and were the talk of the neighbourhood.
During the 1956 uprising, the family fled, eventually to arrive in Canada, in Ottawa -- Alex would only live in a capital city.
Sara, despite a fluency in seven languages, accepted any position available -- cook, maid, cleaner -- to make a living. Later, she worked in the kitchen at the Jewish day school and also ran a community snack bar on weekends. Her reputation as cook spread and she landed the position of head of the kitchen at an Ottawa home for the aged.
Retirement did not suit my mother -- she had an active, nervous mind that needed constant activity.
Her three kids provided the opportunity. Ever a dabbler in their lives, they were never aught but cubs to her tigress. "I can criticize you all," she used to say, "but if anyone else does I'll scratch their eyes out!"
Yes, that was mum. Loyal, intuitive, and brave as all get out possessor of a natural nobility that never needed proving nor felt shame at doing menial tasks when necessary. She loved and hated fiercely, and her Friends knew it and accepted the storms along with the plentiful sunshine.
Peter STARK is the son of Sara STARK.

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STA surnames continued to 03sta002.htm