McCREA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
McCREA, Carol Jean
Jean ended her battle with cancer peacefully, on Wednesday, March 5, 2003, while at home in Toronto with her family. She was the daughter of Donna (WITWICKI) and the late Pete CLENDENNING. She is survived by her beloved husband Frank, children Kent and Allison, mother Donna, and brothers Gary and Gordon. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario (B.A.) and University of Toronto (B.Ed.), Jean dedicated 30 years of her life to the path of education, teaching both the children and adults of Ontario. As a passionate person, she had a love for travel, most things purple, and adventure, but always first in her heart was a desire to be with her Friends and family. As she was always looking forward and never looking back, we bid her now a loving farewell, hold safe the best memories in our heart and pray. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on on Sunday, March 9th. A service will be held at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, on Monday, March 10th at 11 o'clock. Private interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, the family would appreciate donations be sent to the White Light Hospice, 4 Wellesley Place, Toronto M4Y 2K4, or made on line at www.mccrea.ca The hospice is a place where Jean volunteered her time and found the opportunity to draw on her experience to bring comfort to others.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-16 published
His vision for Canada went sky-high
Aircraft engineer worked at Canadian Vickers during the Second World War and helped in development of Canadair
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - Page R9
Perhaps more than anyone else, Peter GOOCH gave Canada its wings. An aeronautical engineer, he helped to build the company that went on to become Canadair, the aerospace division of Bombardier and the foundation for Canada's success as an aircraft manufacturer.
Like many young men of his generation, the Second World War had thrust him into the job of his dreams: chief engineer of a vast aircraft plant building flying boats for submarine patrols and converting military transports into commercial aircraft.
Mr. GOOCH, who died in February at the age of 88, joined Canadian Vickers at the outbreak of the war. The company was building ships in the east end of Montreal but expanded to build sea planes, including those that landed on floats and skis as well as amphibians, so-called flying boats, which could take off from water or land.
Canadian Vickers moved its aeronautical arm to Cartierville airport, then a three-kilometre streetcar ride from the edge of Montreal.
In May 1942, the federal government got involved by helping to build a 150,000-square-metre plant. Within three months, Mr. GOOCH and his team turned out the first PBY, or Canso, an advanced flying boat which saw extensive service in the war. The technology behind the Canso's ability to take off and land using the fuselage as a hull is still used in Canadair's water bombers.
The assembly line produced 340 Cansos. Then a young man who was not yet 30, Mr. GOOCH supervised a complex engineering project with dozens of engineers and thousands of workers under him. As the war came to an end, the factory expanded to convert military C47s into civilian DC3s.
At one point, Mr. GOOCH was also sent to England to work on the development of the legendary de Havilland Mosquito, an all-wood fighter-bomber that was later made in Canada and used by the Royal Canadian Air Force.
Mr. GOOCH was not only a clever engineer but a man of quiet charm and an accomplished linguist. Both these traits smoothed the path for his winning the contract for Vickers to build Montreal's first subway cars. Because he was fluent in French, he was able to deal with the mayor of Montreal, Jean DRAPEAU, something few English-only speaking businessmen of his day could manage.
By 1964, Mr. GOOCH was vice-president of engineering at Canadian Vickers. He convinced the mayor that his firm, located in a working class, French-Canadian district, could do the job of building the subway cars. Shortly after winning the contract, Mr. GOOCH was promoted to president of Canadian Vickers.
Peter William GOOCH was born on February 18, 1915, in Toronto. His father was a successful businessman who owned and ran a window-manufacturing company.
He attended Upper Canada College and the University of Toronto, graduating with a degree in civil engineering in 1936. A year later, he earned a masters degree in aeronautical engineering. His first job in aviation was with de Havilland and he transferred to the company's home base in England. He worked at its plants until the outbreak of the war when he started at Canadair, which was then owned by Canadian Vickers. After the war, the government wanted to encourage the development of an aviation industry using Canadair as a base. After one postwar re-organization, Canadair was bought by an American firm with the odd name of The Electric Boat Company. It formed the basis of General Dynamics, the defence giant.
Mr. GOOCH opted to stay with Canadian Vickers and moved to its operation on the St. Lawrence River. He left the firm in 1967 and moved to Toronto as president and part owner of the firm that became FluiDynamic Devices Inc., a company that turned exotic inventions developed at the National Research Council in Ottawa into commercial products.
A man of immense curiosity, he would get caught up in many projects, including a windtunnel. Called Airflow, it helped measure industrial emissions as part of an environmental initiative put together long before most people had heard of the word. The firm sold its first wind tunnel to Volvo, in Sweden, to test the aerodynamics of its cars.
In his spare time, Mr. GOOCH read in many languages and in addition to French, he spoke Russian, Spanish, German and Italian. When visiting businessmen arrived from Europe, he was always called upon to entertain them. At the age of 60, he decided to learn Japanese since his firm, FluiDynamics, had picked up a Japanese client.
A devoted family man, he spent his free time at the cottage he built at Lac Oureau, north of Montreal. A patient fisherman, his son remembers him catching just one trout on the fished-out lake in the southern Laurentians. The family would head further north on fishing trips every summer.
His hobbies included carpentry and a whole range of sports from skiing to golf. He was fit even in his later years and last summer was the first time he used a cart instead of walking the course.
Mr. GOOCH died in Toronto on February 27. He leaves his wife Evelyn and his four children.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-27 published
His calling was behind the scenes
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, June 27, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- Jimmy FULLER's first job in the theatre was playing Julius Caesar at the Royal Alex in Toronto. Odd for a teenage boy with no acting experience. But he played the post-Ides of March Julius Caesar, lying dead in a coffin on the stage, a part no actor wanted to perform.
His father was a business agent for the stage union the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, and he wangled the job for the boy. Jimmy FULLER went into his father's trade. He was a member of International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees for 54 years and was president of Local 58 for 36 years, until just before his death on May 22 at the age of 82.
Jimmy FULLER worked as an electrician at Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the opening performance of Camelot in 1960. He stayed there for more than 30 years, as chief electrician for the theatre, which in time changed its name to the Hummingbird Centre.
A union leader, he was also an entrepreneur. In 1976, he started his own company, Canadian Staging Projects, which rented stage equipment. It was successful, and he continued as president until the 1990s. During that time, he also worked in many productions and negotiated contracts with the likes of theatre owner Ed MIRVISH and impresario Garth DRABINSKY.
The 350 members of Local 58 work behind the scenes in live theatre in Toronto. They are the stagehands and electricians for everything from the Royal Alex to the Canadian National Exhibition. Jimmy FULLER was so enthusiastic about live theatre he would sometimes invest in the shows themselves. Some were small productions, but his most successful flutter was in the musical Cats.
James Charles FULLER was born in Toronto on October 31, 1920. He went to Runnymede Public School and then followed the family trade, qualifying as an electrician after studying at Western Tech high school. One of his first jobs, apart from playing the dead Julius Caesar, was at a movie theatre, the Runnymede Odeon, starting as an usher.
In 1941, he joined the army and when they discovered his stage talent he was put to work as part of the crew for the Army Show.
He was involved with staging productions, and the one he remembered in particular was with the Canadian comedy team, Wayne and Shuster
Just before the end of the war he was sent to British Columbia for more serious wartime work: wiring minesweepers, which were essentially wooden ships that used electrical signals to detect mines. He was back in Toronto just before the end of the war, working in his old trade as an electrician at the Odeon.
In 1950, he started J. Fuller Lighting Ltd., a freelance theatrical lighting business. It was around that time that he became a business agent for the Toronto Local 58 of International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. At the end of that decade he became the head electrician for the O'Keefe Centre and stayed on there until But it wasn't as if that were his only job. Along with running his own company, he was running the union, negotiating contracts with local theatre owners, in particular the Mirvishes.
"Jimmy was labour and I was management. We fought one another tooth and nail for 30 years. We should have been the bitterest of enemies," Mr. MIRVISH said in a statement issued on Mr. FULLER's death. "We actually became the best of Friends."
He travelled with many shows, working with the Charlottetown Festival and the military Tattoo. He also worked closely with the Canadian Opera Company and was himself a fan of the opera.
Jimmy FULLER led a quiet home life and his family said that once he was home he never talked business. He leaves his wife, Eleanor, to whom he had been married for 58 years, and his daughter Susan.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Toronto's musical Mr. Chips
Headmaster of private Crescent School took over a rundown building and fixed its wiring, plumbing and even its furnace until a newer structure could be found
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page R5
He was the first Canadian-born principal of a Toronto boys' school that for its first 50 years had hired only British headmasters. Bill BURRIDGE, who has died at the age of 79, remained at Toronto's Crescent School until 1986.
The boys at the school both respected him and feared him. The father of one former head boy remembers "Mr. BURRIDGE" as a man who could "cut through the BS. The boys knew they couldn't get away with anything with him. But he was a wonderful teacher."
Mr. BURRIDGE was an unlikely Mr. Chips. If you looked back at his early school career, no one would have picked him for the job as a headmaster at a private school.
William BURRIDGE was a working class boy who was born in Toronto on August 16, 1923. His father, an English immigrant, was a painter for Imperial Oil. Young Bill went to Western Technical-Commercial School to become an electrician.
But like many of his generation, the Second World War wrought changes in his life.
He went into the Royal Canadian Air Force as an electrician. One of his first postings was to Dorval Airport in Montreal, a military field during the war, where one of his fellow electricians, Phil JONES, remembered they worked on odd planes for the Royal Canadian Air Force, odd because they were not the standard aircraft flown by Bomber Command. They were American planes, twin-engined B-25 bombers and the long range four engine B-24 Liberators.
One big B-24 was unique. It was named Commando and its bomb racks had been stripped out to make it into a passenger plane, with two private bunks for Winston Churchill, the wartime British Prime Minister and his doctor. The plane was parked at Dorval a lot of the time, from where it could easily head out to Bermuda, West Africa or to Cairo, or across the Atlantic to Britain. The aircraft was serviced by Royal Canadian Air Force electricians, including Mr. BURRIDGE. The posting provided interesting stories for him to tell in later life.
Mr. BURRIDGE and the other electricians were sent to different bases, including one just outside Vancouver. While there they used to pick up extra money on their leave by hitchhiking across the border to Seattle to work as drivers and warehousemen at a fruit-packing plant. The war meant a shortage of men and the Canadian airmen were given weekend work, no questions asked.
A professional musician on the double bass since the age of 17, through the war Mr. BURRIDGE played in pickup bands and an Royal Canadian Air Force band, along with Mr. Jones and others.
When Mr. BURRIDGE came home from the war he kept playing. During the late forties he played at dances at the Young Men's Christian Association and at clubs such as the Rex. In the fifties he played in the Benny Lewis Orchestra at places such as the Casa Loma and the Palace Pier, then a dance hall, now a family of condos on Lake Ontario. He played with the jazz great Moe KAUFMAN and did some session work with the jazz singers Peggy LEE and Pearl BAILEY.
Mr. BURRIDGE also played during the summers at resorts in the Muskokas. To get there he had to book an extra seat on the lake steamer Segwun for his big bass.
A short time after the war Mr. BURRIDGE decided to take advantage of the free education earned by his wartime service. He went to the University of Toronto and graduated in 1950 in arts and sciences. He worked as a salesman for General Foods for a year and then started teaching school, first in Coppercliff in northern Ontario and then in Scarborough near Toronto.
By the late fifties he was a principal in Whitby, just outside Toronto. But a car accident on the way to school influenced his view of things. His car slipped on ice and broadsided a telephone pole. Although unhurt, the crash made him ready for a change. One day he was on jury duty at a courtroom in downtown Toronto and spotted an ad in the Globe and Mail for a grade 5 teacher at Crescent School. He applied and got the job.
Crescent School was then on the old Massey estate on Dawes Road at Victoria Park. When he started there were only nine teachers, 100 students and the school went from kindergarten to grade 8.
Mr. BURRIDGE introduced music to the curriculum and became a popular teacher. When the headmaster was ill he took over on a part-time basis, becoming headmaster on his predecessor's death in 1966.
At the time, Crescent School was a mess. The building was falling apart and the headmaster was called on to fix the electrical work, the plumbing and even the furnace. He helped in the search for a new building and in 1972 the school moved to the old Garfield Weston Estate at Bayview Avenue and Post Road.
Over the years Crescent School changed and dropped the lower grades and expanded as far as the last grade of high school. Mr. BURRIDGE remained headmaster until 1971 and stayed on teaching and as assistant director of the Lower School until his retirement in 1986.
In private, Mr. BURRIDGE was also a Mr. Fixit. He helped keep up some family rental properties and often workered on his old Buicks or his house in suburban Ajax, Ontario, on a lot of almost half an acre. His other hobby was keeping bees.
Bill BURRIDGE leaves his wife Faith, to whom he was married for 54 years, and his three children, Reid, Rob and Hope.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
PICK, Archibald Roy (Archie)
After a long courageous battle with pancreatic cancer, Archie PICK died peacefully on August 23, 2003. His wife, Jeannie, was at his side.
Archie was born August 18, 1938, in a log cabin in Red Lake, Ontario. He moved to Winnipeg with his parents in 1941. He attended public schools in Winnipeg, Rathwell and Notre Dame de Lourdes, Manitoba.
He was preceded in death by his first wife, Marcia, brother, Leonard, sister, Barbara and father William. Archie is survived by his loving wife, Jeannie, his mother Mary, son David (Christine McCREADY,) daughters: Kirsten Ann GAUCHER (John) and Jennifer Marie SANCHEZ (Christopher) and grand_son Jacob GAUCHER. Archie was very proud of his family and loved them all dearly.
Archie attended the University of Manitoba and the University of North Dakota. He received his B.S. in Civil Engineering (1962) and M.S. in Civil Engineering (1966). Archie started his professional career with the Structural Division of Manitoba Hydro in 1962, and after receiving his Master's degree in 1966, he joined the Metropolitan Corporation in Greater Winnipeg (City of Winnipeg) in the Waterworks and Waste Division. In 1973, Archie moved with his family to Edmonton to join the newly formed Environment Canada as head of Water Pollution Control for the Western Region (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories). In 1976, he was appointed Chief, Environmental Conservation Branch, Western Region, Environment Canada. Subsequently, he left Public Service and joined the consulting engineering firm of James F. MacLaren Limited as General Manager of Western Canadian Operations (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Yukon). One of the highlights of this position was acting as Project Manager for the clean-up and recovery of the Russian Cosmos satellite which crashed in the Northwest Territory in the region of Great Slave Lake. In 1980, Archie became the Executive Vice President of MacLaren Plansearch, division of Lavalin. In 1982, he joined Interprovincial Pipe Line Limited (Enbridge, Inc.) and was appointed as Manager, Design and Construction, for the Norman Wells Pipeline Project, drawing on his experience in the north, engineering, and environment. The successful completion of this project was clearly the highlight of his career. His career at Interprovincial Pipe Line involved him in the company's endeavours in Canada, U.S.A., Mexico, Venezuela and Ecuador. He retired in 1998 as a result of health concerns.
At various times, Archie taught as a part time professor in the faculty of Engineering at the University of Manitoba and the University of Alberta. During his working career, he had been registered as a Professional Engineer in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territory. He was a Life Member of the Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists, and Geophysicists.
Archie, along with Marcia and his children, was an avid skier and was involved with Alpine Ski Racing throughout most of his adult life. He was a Life Member of the Edmonton Snow Valley Ski Club; a senior official of the Alberta Alpine Division of the Canadian Ski Association; served as North Zone Chairman for Canadian Ski Association-Alpine Division; was a long time member of the Edmonton Superbowl Ski team.
Archie and Jeannie were married in 1993 and lived in Edmonton until Archie's retirement in 1998. Since then they have divided their time between their cottage at Clear Lake and their home on Vancouver Island, enjoying family, Friends, and time together.
A bright, shining, steady light has gone from our lives, but will remain in our hearts forever. A memorial service was conducted in Erickson, Manitoba and another memorial service will be held on Sunday, October 19, 2003, at 2: 00 p.m. in the Knox United Church, Parksville, British Columbia.
In lieu of flowers, memoriam to Canadian Diabetes Association, Heart and Stroke Foundation or Cancer Research.
Rae's Funeral Service of Erickson, Manitoba, were in care of the arrangements. (204) 636-7727.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
From fashion to furniture
Photographer gave up the fast life in Manhattan to open a shop in the Ontario countryside
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 6, 2003 - Page F11
Malcolm BATTY was a top fashion photographer, taking pictures of the likes of Christie Brinkley and Andie MacDowell for big Manhattan department stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue. But for the past 15 years, he ran an art and furniture shop in the hamlet of Mono Centre, living in a farmhouse in the countryside nearby.
At the peak of his photography career in the early 1980s, Mr. BATTY, who has died at the age of 57, moved in a rarefied world of high fashion and show business in New York City. Not bad for a kid who had started his working life as a waiter in a coffee shop in Toronto's Yorkville district in the early 1960s.
A man as handsome as his models were beautiful, he was always cool, in an understated way. Even when he was in the furniture business, he had a low-key style, bringing his finished pieces into town in an old red Toyota Land Cruiser.
Mr. BATTY dropped out of photography, and the fast life in New York City, in part because he came to find the world of fashion so shallow. He moved back to Canada with his new wife, Jane FELLOWES, and started making furniture. The first pieces they sold were birdhouses made from things such as orange crates.
They sold their high-end birdhouses at the Pack Rat, which at the time was the only furniture shop along the strip of Yonge Street in Rosedale, an area now jammed with fashionable stores.
"We decided our birdhouses were not going to be the common hardware-store style," Mr. BATTY told an interviewer in 1994. "They would have themes: Muskoka lodges, Santa Fe roadhouses, Indian dhows, grain elevators. Very odd stuff. We took them down to Pack Rat and, lo and behold, they started to sell for $220 to $250 a piece."
Malcolm David BATTY was born of British parents in India, on November 29, 1945. His birthplace was Nasik, just outside Bombay near where his mother was a military nurse. His father was a riding instructor for the British army who left the family soon after Malcolm's birth.
When the British left India in 1947, Malcolm and his mother returned to England. He was brought up in Wales with his mother and grandparents. He went to an experimental school, but was never a brilliant student. He did learn one skill that came in handy in later life: building dry stone walls. His grandfather taught him how and he built a series of stone walls on his farm in Mono Township, using rocks from the foundation of an old barn.
Mr. BATTY decided to come to Canada when he was about 16. He had relatives in Brockville, Ontario, but soon made his way to Toronto. While working in the Peddler coffee shop, he started to paint. He had a studio above a sail-making shop on Front Street and just about made a living selling his paintings. He was talented enough, but he needed formal training. He received a grant to study in Paris.
While there, a friend gave him a 35-mm camera and he stopped painting, for a while anyway, and started taking pictures. He came back to Toronto, was successful and then moved to New York City. The full page ads in The New York Times were his specialty superstar models and spreads for the big Manhattan stores.
"It was the painting that made him a great photographer," said Alan VENABLES, a friend and the owner of the Pack Rat. "He was a photographer with a painter's eye. Not too many of those."
Like someone trying to quit smoking, Mr. BATTY tried to kick the Manhattan habit more than once. His favourite escape was in a camper van, travelling across the United States and ending up in Mexico, usually the Baja Peninsula.
When he came back to Canada in the mid-1980s, it was with Jane FELLOWES, a Canadian. They spent some time in Cyprus, where Mr. BATTY's mother had retired. While there, they kept busy training horses. Because his father had been a riding instructor, Mr. BATTY wanted to see if he had the same talents. It turned out that he had a natural touch with horses.
After their furniture business took off, Mr. BATTY and Ms. FELLOWES wanted to find a shop where they could work and sell some of the things they made. They found it in Mono Centre, almost an hour north of the Toronto international airport. They opened a shop called Tequila Cove, across the driveway from a restaurant and pub, the Mono Cliffs Inn.
By this time, they made more than birdhouses and had expanded to tables with hammered tin tops, stripped cedar furniture and seagulls carved from old white fencing. What they didn't sell in the shop was put in the back of the Land Cruiser and went to Toronto.
Mr. BATTY took up photography again, working for a quarterly magazine called In The Hills. A few years ago, he landed a big assignment as the still photographer for a film Called Spirit of Havana, a National Film Board Production. It was one of many trips to Cuba and he always took his cameras.
This started a collection of photography that is to be published this fall. The book is called Cuba, Grace Under Pressure, with the text by Toronto writer Rosemary SULLIVAN. There are 102 pictures, with the theme being Cuban culture, the aging musicians, poets and dancers of the revolutionary era. It talks about how ordinary Cubans survive day to day.
Mr. BATTY had also started to paint again in the past few years. And he loved music, in particular the blues. He owned a vintage electric guitar, a 1967 Fender Telecaster. He leaves his wife, Ms. FELLOWES, and his mother.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Singer was hit on Hit Parade
Canadian-born performer played violin with Jack Benny and posed as wife of Sid Caesar
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
She was called "Canada's First Lady of Song." In the late 1940s, singer Gisele MacKENZIE was so popular on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio that she was known just by her first name.
When she was 23, she headed off to Hollywood, where she became one of the main singers on Your Hit Parade, a popular American network television show in the 1950s. By the time television started in Canada in 1952, she was already a star in the United States, appearing on programs with Jack Benny and later with Sid Caesar, the hottest comedian of his day.
Gisele MacKENZIE, who has died at the age of 76, was not always known by that name. On the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, she was known simply as Gisele, though a 1950 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release did call her by her proper name -- Gisele LAFLECHE. As soon as she moved to CBS in 1951, she adopted the stage name Gisele MacKENZIE. The reason, she told a New York reporter in 1955, was that the name Gisele LAFLECHE "sounded too much like a striptease artist's." The real explanation was an American audience would have trouble with so French a name. It was the television network that ordered the name change.
Marie Marguerite Louise Gisele LAFLECHE was born on January 10, 1927, in Winnipeg. The name MacKENZIE was from her paternal grandmother. Her father, Georges, was a doctor, who played the violin, and her mother, Marietta MANSEAU, was a concert pianist and singer as a young woman. Ms. MacKENZIE started playing the violin seriously when she was 7. She made her first public performance at the Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg at the age of 12.
When she was 14, her family sent her to the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. She studied the violin and the piano, and planned on being a concert violinist. Later in life, a story circulated that she never took voice lessons, but Jim GUTHRO, who was at the conservatory at the same time, remembered a voice teacher who took an interest in her. He also remembered that she attended at the same time as Robert GOULET and they would sing together.
When she first came to Toronto, she stayed at Rosary Hall, a residence for Catholic girls on Bloor Street at the top of Jarvis Street. Tess MALLOY, who was there at the same time, remembered her. "She lived right across the hall from me. She and her girlfriend used to drive us nuts practising the violin."
Ms. MALLOY didn't remember her singing at the residence, but somewhere along the way someone discovered Ms. MacKENZIE could sing. It was close to the end of the war and she started to perform for groups of servicemen. It was then that she was discovered by musician Bob SHUTTLEWORTH, a lieutenant who led a band for the Royal Canadian Navy.
Right after the war, she started singing with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH's band at the Glenmount Hotel on the Lake of Bays, north of Toronto. Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, who later became her manager and her husband, took her to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which then broadcast live popular music over the radio.
"Bob SHUTTLEWORTH called me at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and said, 'Get a studio, a piano and a vocal mike. I have someone I want you to hear,' recalled Jackie RAE, then a music producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, later leader of his own band (and, incidentally, the uncle of former Ontario premier Bob RAE.) "I remember her wonderful voice and how fresh she was. We hired her straight away to do three programs a week."
The program was Meet Gisele, and it ran for 15 minutes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The program started on October 8, 1946, and lasted for four years. She was so popular the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation used her in other programs with names such as The Girl Next Door or The Song Pluggers.
In 1951, Ms. MacKENZIE was spotted by Bing CROSBY's son, and went to work in the United States for Bob CROSBY's Club 15, bumping the Andrews Sisters from their regular slot. The pay was $20,000 (U.S.) a year, worth $150,000 in today's money. She was 23.
The money was something Canada could never match. Mr. GUTHRO, later head of Variety at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, guesses she was making $200 a week for her radio programs.
"Gisele Leaves for Hollywood. Canada's Loss," read a headline in one Toronto paper. The article guessed at the pay package, and it was right.
Ms. MacKENZIE was about to have her best decade ever in show business. After a short stint on Club 15, she worked on the Mario Lanza Show, before landing her full-time job at Your Hit Parade. The idea behind the NBC program was to take the top seven songs on the hit parade that week and have them done by the regular singers in the Your Hit Parade troupe. The half-hour program was a huge success in the United States and in late 1953 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation picked it up for a while.
Ms. MacKENZIE was the only regular singer on the program to have her own hit record, Hard to Get, in 1955.
Though none of her family shared her success, all were musical. There were her parents, both of whom were serious amateur musicians two of her sisters sang and played, and a brother played the cello. Along with Gisele, two of them had what is called perfect pitch.
"It's rare and she had it," Mr. RAE said. "You would play four notes on the piano and she could match them. Perfect pitch isn't always a great thing, but in her case it was."
Ms. MacKENZIE's training as a classical violinist came in handy on the Jack Benny program, on which she first appeared in 1955. The droll comedian always made a thing of how he couldn't play the violin. One vaudeville-type act they would do on his show involved her patiently showing him what to do with a violin after he made some awful screeching noise with his bow.
She was Jack Benny's protégé, and he helped land her own television program in 1958. Called the Gisele MacKENZIE Show, it lasted only six months.
But she remained famous. At one stage, she was the subject of This is Your Life, which involved linking up with old Friends and relatives. She was a regular on game shows that featured minor celebrities, such as Hollywood Squares.
In 1963, she was cast as Sid Caesar's television wife and made regular trips to New York City, where the program was done. Like other television programs of that era, it was live, since videotape was only just being introduced.
Ms. MacKENZIE also acted and sang in live musicals in the United States, things such as Annie Get Your Gun and South Pacific. Over the years, she also worked in Las Vegas, performing in night clubs there. She returned to Canada for the occasional concert and television special, including one on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in late 1960. It was about "her story book career" and included the yarn, always told by her publicists, of how she decided to take up singing after she lost her $3,000 violin.
By the end of the 1960s, the big work started to dry up and Canadian newspapers were running the occasional "Where Are They Now" articles. She was in a sprawling ranch house in suburban Encino, Calif. She also owned property in Palmdale and Marin County, Calif., as well as a house on Lake Manitoba back home.
All that detail came up in a nasty divorce from Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH in 1968. Because he was also her manager, he kept 10 per cent of her gross income for the next three years. She later married a banker, Robert KLEIN, but that also ended in divorce.
During the rest of her career, Ms. MacKENZIE kept working in regional theatre and made guest appearances on television series, including MacGyver and Murder, She Wrote, as well as singing stints on programs such as the Dean Martin Show. She also did television commercials in the United States and Canada.
Ms. MacKENZIE had some odd hobbies. She collected and mixed exotic perfumes and in the 1950s she took up target shooting, becoming an expert shot. She and her first husband had a large collection of pistols, rifles and shotguns. In her later years, like many Hollywood stars, she was involved with Scientology.
Ms. MacKENZIE, who died in Burbank, Calif., on September 5, had two children with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, a son Mac and a daughter Gigi (short for Gisele) DOWNS.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-02 published
He fought the Teamsters -- and won
Worker won protection for part-timers in a court battle that involved the most powerful union in North America
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, October 2, 2003 - Page R13
Gerry MASSICOTTE was a man who didn't like being pushed around, and one of his fights made him famous, at least for a while. He won a precedent-setting case involving unfair labour practices, not just against his employer but also the Teamsters, the most powerful union in North America. The legal battle lasted about three years, in what was mostly a one-man fight in a case that was heard in the Supreme Court of Canada.
He didn't take no for an answer when the union said it wouldn't handle his grievance, insisting that he deserved better because he had paid his dues.
"His fight was based on the simple principle of taxation without representation," said Ray KUSZELEWSKI, now a Halifax lawyer but back in the late 1970s another Teamster with a problem with the union. The Teamsters not only refused to represent Mr. MASSICOTTE, but it negotiated a lower wage, from $6.85 an hour to $6, in Mr. MASSICOTTE, who has died at the age of 55, was a man who could not be pigeonholed. He had a degree in social work and worked as a professional for more than 10 years before the intensity of the work forced him to leave.
Gerald Manley MASSICOTTE was born on October 22, 1947, in Toronto. His father worked at the Post Office, his mother worked in restaurants. Eventually she ended up owning her own place, The New Brazil, at Runnymede and St. Clair in Toronto. Later, Mr. MASSICOTTE and his wife, Elaine, would take it over.
Mr. MASSICOTTE went to Runnymede Collegiate and graduated with a degree in social work from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. He worked for many years as a social worker in group homes for children and in halfway houses. He then took on part-time work, including a stint at Humes Transport, loading refrigerated trucks. He did that for 2½ years, before he was fired.
That started his long crusade against the Teamsters. On Aug.16, 1979, he filed a grievance asking his union to protest his firing.
"I claim that I have been unjustly terminated and must be reinstated immediately," began his grievance letter to local 938 of the Teamsters. The answer came back that the union would not represent him, and that he had no protection as a part-time employee, in spite of paying union dues of $18 a month.
At the time, Mr. MASSICOTTE and others were unhappy with the way the Teamsters were run and he set out to prove that it did him wrong.
The case went to the Canada Labour Relations Board. The union argued that the safe, clean environment it negotiated with Humes Transport was a great benefit for a part-timer like Mr. MASSICOTTE. The union also informed him that his pay would be lowered so the company could pay full-time employees more. In late January, 1980, the Labour Relations Board ruled in favour of Mr. MASSICOTTE, ordering the union to pay costs. But the Teamsters wouldn't quit. The union took the case to the Federal Court of Appeal in October, 1980, but lost.
"The union and the employer have established the price of their labour, and in MASSICOTTE's case, reduced that price drastically without asking him," wrote the court.
The case went to the Supreme Court, and the Chief Justice, Bora LASKIN, confirmed the lower court's ruling in May, 1982.
"It was one of the few cases in which a union member took his union to court for not representing him," said Brian IHLER, the lawyer who worked with him on the case.
It set a precedent that all unions in Canada would have to represent all their dues-paying members.
By the time the Supreme Court ruling came down, Mr. MASSICOTTE had moved on with his life. A keen cook, he took courses at George Brown College. He also became well-known again, but for his food this time. He renamed his mother's restaurant, the Northland Truck Stop and Café.
Mr. MASSICOTTE later moved into his wife's father's business, selling and servicing small pumps, used soft-drink machines and even kidney dialysis machines. He and his wife ran the company, Potter-Blersh. He died of cancer on July 15.
Gerry MASSICOTTE leaves wife Elaine BLERSH; siblings Debbie, Jeff, Ron and Jim; and mother Joan.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
An old-fashioned newsman
Distinguished journalist began humbly as a copy boy at the Hamilton Spectator and soared to the top of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
During the October Crisis of 1970, there were a lot of editors who buckled under. They followed the orders of the police and the Quebec and federal governments about not printing or broadcasting some details about the kidnapping of British Trade Commissioner James CROSS and the kidnapping and murder of Quebec cabinet minister Pierre LAPORTE.
Many editors and broadcast executives took to self-censorship, anticipating what the authorities wanted and keeping newscasts and newspapers clean. Denis HARVEY, who has died at age of 74, was not one of them.
Then editor of The Gazette of Montreal, the man he faced down was Jerome CHOQUETTE, Quebec's justice minister and the public face of authority during much of the crisis. CHOQUETTE did not want newspapers to publish the full manifesto of the Front de libération du Québec. Denis HARVEY ignored the request and published it.
The paper also broke the news that police had a photograph of James CROSS sitting on what looked like a box of dynamite. The justice minister warned The Gazette editor he could be arrested under the terms of the War Measures Act, but Mr. HARVEY called his bluff.
During the crisis, Mr. HARVEY didn't change his habits. When the paper was put to bed, he would walk to the Montreal Men's Press Club in the Mount Royal Hotel carrying the bulldog or first edition of the paper and sit at the bar and argue statistics with the sports editor, Brodie SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER.
There would also be political discussions, some of them heated, since the man who wrote the stamp column at the paper had been called up from the reserves in the military and took himself, and the War Measures Act, quite seriously.
Mr. HARVEY was an old-fashioned newsman, a high-school dropout who rose to edit newspapers and who went on to run the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television news service and then the entire Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television network.
Denis Martin HARVEY was born on August 15, 1929, in Hamilton, where his father was a customs inspector. He left school halfway through Grade 13 and landed a job as a copy boy at The Hamilton Spectator. This was not uncommon and was the traditional route for a young person coming into the newspaper business. Journalism schools were all but unknown and university-educated reporters and editors were rare.
He went from copy boy, ripping the wire copy off the machines, to listening in for police tips on radio scanners. He became a sports writer and in 1952 quit the paper and went to travel in Europe for six months. He came back to the Spectator as a general reporter the next year.
He did everything, from labour columnist to business writer. At 26, he was city editor of the Spectator and then news editor. In 1961, he was executive editor and held that job for five years.
In 1966, he moved to The Canadian Magazine, a joint venture with the Toronto Star. It meant leaving Hamilton after 21 years, but it was the first step to the most important job in his career editor of The Gazette, which he took over in 1969, the year he turned 40.
Mr. HARVEY was tough. He scared people with a gruff demeanour, which at times seemed like something out of The Front Page. When he arrived at The Gazette, it was losing the newspaper war with rival Montreal Star. Many editors had cozy sinecures. Almost right away, Mr. HARVEY fired the head of every department but one. When one editor came into his office and said he had found another job and was giving two weeks' notice. HARVEY shot back: "Two hours' notice." The man was gone in less.
However, he inspired loyalty in his staff of reporters and editors.
"He could be tough but he stood up for his staff. And he was completely honest and honourable. A stand-up guy," said Brian STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, who covered city hall at The Gazette and was later hired by Mr. HARVEY at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. "You always wanted to impress him."
One night at Martin's, a bar next door to The Gazette, there were complaints about a sports picture in the paper. The photographer said to Mr. HARVEY: " I'd like to see you do better."
Next night he was at the Forum for a Canadiens game. Along with two regular photographers, he took pictures which, unsigned, went back to the office for selection. His picture made the paper.
It was a combination of hot news stories and the ability to turn around a failing newspaper that made his reputation at The Gazette. The police strike in 1969, the October Crisis, riots and labour battles made the period one of the most exciting in the paper's history.
Having secured his reputation as an editor, Mr. HARVEY was lured away to television in 1973 to become chief news editor at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television News in Toronto. His colleagues told him he was crazy.
"My newspaper Friends said: 'How can you make the transition?' Mr. HARVEY said years later. "But I'm surprised more people don't. I believe in changing jobs."
Although he didn't know anything about television, he told people: "I do know pictures." He went to CBS in New York for a crash course in television news.
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television News was as much of a mess as The Gazette had been. There had been a series of editors who hadn't managed to get a handle on the place. Mr. HARVEY took quick action and made it more professional, spending less time on bureaucracy and more time on the main newscast.
One night, an old-time producer was called into his office and the new chief news editor asked him why he hadn't gone with a fresh lead story. The producer replied he couldn't order anyone to do that -- that was the lineup editor's job. Mr. HARVEY disagreed and said: "Put on your coat and go home." The man kept his job, but worked on the desk and not as a producer.
During his short reign at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News, he brought in fresh faces and got television reporters to think about breaking stories instead of following newspaper headlines. Audience levels rose and so did Mr. HARVEY, moving up the ladder at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. But the promise of a big paycheque lured him to a three-year stint at The Toronto Star starting in 1978.
There, he was first in charge of the editorial page and then became editor in chief and vice-president. He left the Star in 1981 and was replaced by George RADWANSKI, the future federal privacy commissioner, who had worked for him at The Gazette. Mr. HARVEY returned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, taking over sports for the English network. By 1983, he was vice-president of the entire English network of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
He held that job for seven years. He used to say his favourite part of the job was the power to do programming. He changed the face of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and it has stayed that way. Mr. HARVEY took the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation all Canadian -- it took several years but he stopped running American program in prime time.
"We have handed over this most powerful medium to a foreign country," he told a broadcasting conference in 1990. "Nowhere else in the world had one country imported the total television of another country."
Along with Canadian content, one of his lasting creations was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's news and current-affairs specialty channel Newsworld. He left the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1991 and worked off and on as a broadcast consultant. He spent a lot of time travelling and took up some rather un-tough-guy hobbies, such as bird-watching and going to the ballet.
Mr. HARVEY, who died after a brief struggle with cancer, leaves his wife Louise LORE, and Lynn and Brian, his two children from an earlier marriage.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
'The lovable rogue' who made and lost fortunes
One of Canada's most successful real-estate salesmen threw famous parties, especially during the 1980s boom, when he brokered property deals worth more than $10-billion
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- His Friends called him a lovable rogue. His enemies left out the lovable. Eddy COGAN was a love-him or hate-him kind of guy, a brash real-estate salesman, maybe the most successful real-estate salesmen of his era in Canada. He sold more than $10-billion of real estate in the 1980s, by far his most successful decade.
When Eddy COGAN died in late October, people remembered two things about him straightaway: He was the one who brokered the huge Greymac apartment deal. And he was also the greatest party-giver of the 1980s in Toronto, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on a three-day bash, when he would take over the entire Windsor Arms Hotel -- rooms, restaurants and bars -- and open them to his Friends.
Mr. COGAN brokered a deal in 1982 to sell 10,931 apartment units belonging to Cadillac Fairview to a group led by Leonard ROSENBERG of Greymac Trust. The sale was worth $320-million but Mr. COGAN found out a couple of hours later that Mr. ROSENBERG and his partners had flipped the buildings, selling them for $500-million to what turned out to be a fictitious Saudi Arabian consortium. Mr. ROSENBERG eventually went to jail, but Mr. COGAN was clean since he didn't have any part in the illegal flip.
Edwin Aubrey COGAN was born on October 5, 1934. His father had fled Ukraine after the Russian Revolution. It was a sound decision, since Stalin starved the Ukrainian peasants in the 1930s and Hitler's death squads killed almost all the Jews in Kiev during the Nazi occupation.
Eddy's father was a professional boxer and waiter who changed his name from COHEN to COGAN to get work at Toronto's Park Plaza Hotel, which didn't hire Jews in the 1930s. Eddy went to Palmerston Public School but wasn't much of a student and dropped out of school in Grade 9. At 15, he went west and worked in the woods in British Columbia.
A few years of manual labour had him thinking about a change, and he returned to school and qualified as a land surveyor. After many years working surveying properties, he decided to move into real estate. In the 1950s, when Mr. COGAN started doing property deals, most of the action was in what is called "assembling" land, which means buying up huge tracts of land, not just in the country but also in the city.
Mr. COGAN would do things such as go door-to-door asking people if they wanted to sell their houses or buildings. He was working for developers such as Cadillac Fairview, which in turn would put up a strip of high-rise apartment buildings once the land had been assembled. Probably more than any town planner, Mr. COGAN changed the face of Toronto from the 1950s to the 1980s.
"After rent control came in, in 1975, there was less demand for buildings," says Larry COGAN, who worked with his father for more than 20 years. "It was the main reason Cadillac Fairview decided to sell off those properties."
It was that deal that made Eddy COGAN rich and allowed him to launch the famous parties of the 1980s. The parties ended with the real-estate crash of 1989-90. Mr. COGAN had invested in a 6,000-acre property called the "jail lands" just north of the city. It was an old prison farm that was to be turned into a residential development. When the property boom went bust, so did Mr. COGAN. It was the end of one big fortune and the start of a decade spent rebuilding his wealth. In the 1990s, perhaps his most successful transaction involved Terminal 3 at Toronto's Pearson Airport.
Mr. COGAN was a slender man with a wiry build and movie-star good looks. Women found him attractive, and his Friends said that women were his weakness. He enjoyed spending time in Los Angeles and New York in the company of models and actresses -- some famous, some not.
"When he saw an opportunity to be with a high-profile, beautiful woman, he would approach it like a real-estate project," his son Larry said. "He would network and use all his skills to close the deal."
Like many people who work on deals for a living, Eddy COGAN had an unconventional business day, in particular in the latter part of his career. He loathed gadgets. He didn't like cellphones or computers and never had an e-mail address of his own. Rather than offices, he preferred to meet in restaurants, though he was a light eater and didn't drink much. After the Windsor Arms and its restaurants closed, he switched to Prego, a restaurant in Yorkville.
Mr. COGAN lived his work. He was always working on a deal, micromanaging it to make sure the project came off.
"He was a big thinker. He was very fit and he liked to walk and think," said Diane FRANCIS, the journalist who became a close friend after doing a few stories on him in the mid-1980s. "The last big deal he was working on was in Niagara Falls, New York."
When he first looked at Niagara Falls, the town on the Ontario side was a success, with a casino and a diversified tourist trade. Niagara Falls, New York was a dump, with an empty centre, shuttered factories and a neighbourhood that was a household name for environmental catastrophe, Love Canal. Mr. COGAN spent the better part of a decade trying to develop the New York side into a place as successful as the Ontario side. At the time of his death, a casino had opened on the New York side and he was closer to putting his dream together.
He lived in downtown Toronto in a huge penthouse in the Colonnade on Bloor Street, a rental apartment with a small swimming pool inside the unit. Mr. COGAN was a generous man, always willing to help his Friends. Once, when promoters were trying to put together a race between American and Canadian superstar sprinters, Mr. COGAN helped bankroll it. It lost money.
Mr. COGAN married once and divorced. He leaves his six children.

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McCREADY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-31 published
Canada's last air vice-marshal
Pilot who had the most dangerous job in Bomber Command of Second World War won top military decorations and rose to become lieutenant-general
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - Page R7
The double duty of pathfinder and master bomber was the most dangerous assignment in Bomber Command of the Second World War. Like all young fliers who set off to attack German targets, Reg LANE knew he was more likely to be killed in action than any sailor or soldier.
The job of the pathfinder was to go ahead of the main bomber force and drop flares to mark the target. The master bomber would stay over the site for up to 40 minutes, directing the air raid.
Mr. LANE, who has died at the age of 83, did both jobs. He was the commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force's only pathfinder squadron and one of the most decorated Canadian bomber pilots in the Second World War. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross twice, and the rare Distinguished Service Order, which when given to a man of junior rank -- he was only a squadron leader at the time -- is second only to the Victoria Cross for valour.
On two trips as a pathfinder squadron leader, Mr. LANE experienced the twin horrors of the bomber pilot: falling prey to a night fighter and being "coned."
The night fighter struck first. On a raid over Cologne on February 14, 1943, Mr. LANE's Halifax dropped its coloured markers to mark the bomb site only to be attacked by a German Me110, a twin-engine plane with massive firepower. It attacked twice, hitting Mr. LANE's aircraft in the wing. As the Me110 prepared a third attack to finish them off, Mr. LANE stood the Halifax on its nose and put it into a power dive. The bomber screamed toward the surface and he pulled out of the dive close to the sea. The manoeuvre succeeded in losing the fighter, although the severely shot up and metal-stressed Halifax was later declared a write-off.
Being "coned" was to be trapped in the intersecting beams of two or more searchlights. Lit up like a bug on the ceiling of a room, it made a bomber an easy target for anti-aircraft gunners on the ground. On the night of April 16, 1943, the last flight of his second tour of duty, searchlights caught Mr. LANE over Frankfurt as he returned from a raid on the Skoda plant at Pilsen in Czechoslovakia. On that occasion, he dived the plane 1,000 feet to escape the lights.
The citation for his first Distinguished Flying Cross spoke of his After flying 51 missions over Europe, Squadron Leader LANE was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and picked to fly the first Canadian-made Lancaster across the Atlantic. It was called the Ruhr Express. The government wanted to show the public and the Royal Canadian Air Force that it was providing top-of-the-line bombers to replace older planes such as the Halifax and the Wellington, which Canadians were flying.
"The Ruhr Express was a propaganda stunt," says Steve HARRIS, the chief historian of the Department of National Defence in Ottawa. "It was only the prototype, and was flown to Britain long before the regular production Canadian Lancasters were ready to be sent. Choosing Reg LANE to fly the mission shows how highly he was regarded."
The fact that he was a good-looking decorated pilot helped the publicity campaign. The reality was that the first plane was not quite ready to fly. The Lancaster X was made at Victory Aircraft outside Toronto. The plant would later become Avro and make the short-lived supersonic Arrow. The Ruhr Express was rushed into service for its maiden flight on August 1, 1943. Reg LANE later recalled that it was almost unsafe to fly.
"We soon found out about the electrics; none of the engine instruments was working and we had to make a decision whether to press on to Montreal, as planned, or return to Malton," said Mr. LANE, who was fully aware of the propaganda value of the Ruhr Express. "In view of the publicity, we decided it would be politic to head for Dorval. There the aircraft was quickly wheeled into a hangar."
The life of the Ruhr Express is thoroughly documented in Target Berlin, a National Film Board film That is still available.
One of the Canada Carries On series of propaganda "shorts" that preceded the main features, the film was seen at movie theatres during the war. A National Film Board cameraman filmed not only the construction of the Ruhr Express at Malton (now Pearson International airport), but joined the crew that ferried it across the Atlantic and later occupied a passenger seat when Reg LANE took the plane on its first mission over Berlin.
Only six of the new Lancaster X planes arrived in Britain by the end of 1943. Though many others were flown over soon after, by the end of the war many Royal Canadian Air Force crews were still flying the older Halifaxes.
Reginald John LANE was born on January 4, 1920, in Victoria. He went to public school there and after graduating from Victoria High School worked for the Hudson's Bay Co. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in September of 1940.
After pilot training in Canada, under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, Pilot Officer LANE arrived in England in July of 1941. He flew his first mission in November of that year, as a second pilot on a Halifax. The target was Berlin and while cloud cover made the flight a bit safer, it was cold and stormy.
In December he and his crew flew two dangerous missions, daylight raids at low altitude against the German battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, which were in harbour at Brest on the Atlantic coast of France. The bombers came in at 150 feet and met heavy anti-aircraft fire. In the first raid Mr. LANE's squadron commander was shot down; in the second the six Halifax aircraft were heavily damaged by German fire but managed to make it back to England.
Later he also was part of a group that attacked the German battleship Tirpitz, anchored in a fiord in German-occupied Norway. Pilot Officer LANE's Halifax flew from a base at Kinross, Scotland, then, after arriving over Trondheim in Norway, spiralled through the clouds. The Tirpitz was heavily defended and German guns opened up as Mr. LANE's plane flew just above the water. His bomber was hit, cracking the spar in the main wing. Three other Halifaxes were lost but he managed to make it back to Scotland after a nine-hour flight. The Tirpitz was untouched.
Squadron Leader LANE flew in the first of the 1,000 bomber raids designed by Air Marshal Arthur (Bomber) HARRIS to overwhelm German defences. That raid was against Cologne on May 30, 1942, and 41 bombers were lost. His last operational flight was just before D-Day in June of 1944, when he acted as the master bomber over Caen in Normandy. After that he was awarded a second Distinguished Flying Cross, known as a bar to the first medal, after completing three tours of duty.
"He completed many attacks on heavily defended targets in Germany and has consistently displayed a fine fighting spirit throughout his operational career, read the citation. "An officer of outstanding ability whose courage, cheerfulness and keen sense of duty were an inspiration to his crews."
Reg LANE started the war as a pilot officer, the lowest commissioned rank. By 1944 he was a group captain, the air force equivalent of a full colonel, and after his final flight was put in command of a squadron. He was 25.
After the war he stayed on in the air force, attending the Imperial Defence College in England in 1946. He rose in the air-force hierarchy, and took command of the Royal Canadian Air Force base in Edmonton. Later he returned to Europe twice, the second time as chief of staff of the Royal Canadian Air Force's No. 1 Air Division at Metz, Germany.
When the Army, Navy and Air Force became the Canadian Armed Forces on February 1, 1968, his rank changed from air vice-marshal to major-general. In August of 1969 he became deputy commander of Mobile Command in Montreal, then commander of the Transport base at Trenton, Ontario In 1972, with the rank of lieutenant-general, he moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado., as deputy commander of the North American Air Defence Command.
After retiring he worked for a while as a defence consultant before moving full time to Victoria. He was active in air-force associations in Canada and in England. He was a patron of the Yorkshire Air Museum, which has the only surviving Halifax. On the anniversary of the Battle of Britain in early October, he laid a wreath at the war memorial in Victoria.
Reg LANE leaves his wife Barbara, whom he married in 1944, and their two sons and two daughters.

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McCREARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-16 published
Former National Hockey Leaguer MAGNUSON killed, RAMAGE injured in car crash
By Erin CONWAY- SMITH, Tuesday, December 16, 2003 - Page S1
Former National Hockey League defenceman Keith MAGNUSON was killed in a three-car collision yesterday when he was a passenger in a car driven by former Toronto Maple Leaf captain Rob RAMAGE.
RAMAGE was injured in the car crash north of Toronto.
MAGNUSON played 11 years with the Chicago Black Hawks.
York Regional Police said RAMAGE was driving a blue Intrepid that was involved in the accident, caused when one of the vehicles apparently went out of control.
RAMAGE was in an Etobicoke, Ontario, hospital last night, being treated for a broken femur, police said.
The accident, which occurred in Vaughan, happened about 5 p.m., but rescue workers were unable to remove the body until after 10 p.m. Police didn't believe weather was a factor in the accident.
Sergeant Igor CHOMIAK said late last night that an investigation is under way.
A third person, a woman, was being treated for non-life threatening injuries last night.
It was reported that RAMAGE was travelling back to Toronto from Bolton, northwest of the city, after attending the funeral of former National Hockey League player Keith McCREARY, who died last week after a battle with cancer. McCREARY was the chair of the National Hockey League Alumni Association and RAMAGE is the vice-chair.
RAMAGE is a frequent guest commentator on FanSports KFNS, a St. Louis radio station. Last night, the station had posted a notice on an internal bulletin board informing staff about RAMAGE's accident.
RAMAGE, 44, played 1,044 games in the National Hockey League from 1979 to 1994. He served as Maple Leaf captain from 1989 to 1991.
MAGNUSON was born on April 27, 1947, in Wadena, Saskatchewan. He played college hockey at Denver University, where he helped the Pioneers to the N.C.A.A. championship in 1968 and 1969. He was a mainstay on defence for the Blackhawks from 1969 to 1979.

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McCREARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-17 published
Life was good for MAGNUSON
By Eric DUHATSCHEK, With a report from Allan MAKI Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - Page S1
It was one of those "catching up with" features newspapers run every so often. Last January, the Chicago Sun-Times profiled Keith MAGNUSON, one of the most popular players ever to pull on a Chicago Blackhawks sweater.
To the thousands who used to pack the old Chicago Stadium, MAGNUSON's ever-lasting appeal came from a rough-and-tumble playing style that produced a cracked cheekbone, three knee injuries requiring surgery, a torn Achilles' tendon, two broken ankles, a dislocated elbow, three broken jaws, a broken vertebra, a broken wrist, a dislocated shoulder, three missing teeth and more than 400 stitches.
MAGNUSON, after reflecting on his career, his hobbies and all the aches and pains that resulted from a 10-year National Hockey League career, observed: "Otherwise, I feel great. Cindy [his wife] and I are real proud of our kids."
"Life is good," MAGNUSON concluded.
Life for MAGNUSON ended at the age of 56 in a fatal automobile accident on Monday afternoon as he was returning home from a funeral for National Hockey League alumni association chairman Keith McCREARY, who died last week of cancer. MAGNUSON was the passenger in a car driven by former National Hockey League player Rob RAMAGE, the vice-chairman of the alumni association.
MAGNUSON played 589 National Hockey League games for the Blackhawks, and on his retirement in October of 1979, he joined the team's coaching staff, as an assistant to Eddie JOHNSTON. JOHNSTON, now the Pittsburgh Penguins' assistant general manager, remembered MAGNUSON yesterday as "the ultimate competitor. I mean, when Keith MAGNUSON put on the skates on, you didn't just get 100 per cent, you got 110 per cent every night. He just played with so much passion, it was unreal."
The Blackhawks made it to the Stanley Cup final twice in MAGNUSON's career, in 1971 and 1973, losing both times to the Montreal Canadiens. It was the heyday of hockey in Chicago. The Blackhawks had Dennis and Bobby HULL, the legendary Stan MIKITA and Tony ESPOSITO, a future Hall Of Fame member, in goal. MAGNUSON's job was to protect ESPOSITO, and he did it with a passion that JOHNSTON said was contagious in the Blackhawks' dressing room.
"What he always did very, very well was set the tone early in the game. He let the opposition know that when you dropped the puck in the game, "This was what you were going to see, guys, for 60 minutes.' "
MAGNUSON, who most recently was the director of sales for Coca-Cola Enterprises, grew up in Saskatoon as an all-round athlete. He was a boyhood chum of former National Hockey League coach Dave KING. The two attended Churchill elementary school and used to play 1-on-1 hockey: KING as a forward and MAGNUSON as a defenceman.
Eventually, MAGNUSON and four other teenagers from Saskatoon earned scholarships at the University of Denver and helped the Pioneers win two National Collegiate Athletic Association championships. MAGNUSON and Tim GOULD played every sport together and were also teamed as defence partners.
"We never missed a shift," said GOULD, whose wife, a nurse in Calgary, woke him early yesterday to inform him of MAGNUSON's death. "He was the greatest guy and a good friend."
GOULD said he and MAGNUSON used to dream up ways to get MAGNUSON to hockey, football and baseball games on Sunday.
MAGNUSON's parents were Baptists and considered the Sabbath a day of rest. It became GOULD's job to sneak into the MAGNUSON home while they were at church and take Keith's equipment to the rink or the diamond.
"Of course, if we scored a goal or a run, our names would be mentioned in the newspaper the next day," GOULD said. "But we thought we were keeping it secret."
GOULD said MAGNUSON was best known among his Friends for having a poor memory. Once in Saskatoon, MAGNUSON drove his dad's car to the rink for a Blades game, only to drive home with a teammate, the two of them completely immersed in the game they had just played.
The next morning, MAGNUSON's father asked where the car was. "Keith had to run back to the rink to get it," said Dale ZEMAN, another of MAGNUSON's former junior and college teammates. "There was also the night Keith and I went bowling when we were freshmen at Denver. We came out and couldn't find the car. It had rolled backwards three blocks because Keith forgot to put it in park."
GOULD said: "He was awful forgetful. We're having a reunion in June [for Denver University hockey] and we had a card printed up, and Keith's quote on it was: 'I'm going to be there -- and Cliff [KOROLL] is going to remind me.' The memories, that's what get you through this."
MAGNUSON is survived by his wife, his daughter, Molly, and his son, Kevin, a former University of Michigan defenceman who had a tryout with the Blackhawks. Recently, after a short playing career in the East Coast Hockey League, Kevin had gone back to school for his law degree, JOHNSTON said.
"To have something like this happen, this close to the holidays, the timing couldn't be worse. It's never good, but geez, here he is, going up there for a funeral for Keith McCREARY and then to have something like this happen.
"God, it's awful," he said. "We'll miss him. He was such a big part of the community in Chicago, an icon. Everybody knew Keith MAGNUSON. It's an awful tragedy."
San Jose Sharks general manager Doug WILSON, another of MAGNUSON's close Friends, was badly shaken by his former teammate's death. WILSON said he thought of MAGNUSON as something of a father figure. "Keith has had a profound influence on my life." Really, all I can say is, all my thoughts and prayers are with Cindy and the kids right now."
Jim DEMARIA, the Blackhawks executive director of communications, worked closely with MAGNUSON in his role as the founder and president of the Chicago alumni association.
"Any time you needed something, you could call Maggy," DEMARIA said. "He was the first guy in line to help any kind of charity you had. I mean, he was just that kind of person. And when the team wasn't doing real well, he was down in the room, talking to the coaches, telling the players, 'keep your chin up, keep working, things will turn around.' He was a real positive guy."

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