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"ARN" 2003 Obituary


ARNETT  ARNOLD 

ARNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
MILLMAN, Doris A. (NEWMAN) (née ARNETT)
Always to be lovingly remembered by her large extended family, Doris Angelina (née ARNETT) (NEWMAN) MILLMAN died Sunday, March 9, 2003, at Lindenwood Manor, Winnipeg, at the age of 96. The second oldest of the four children of the late T.L. and Leila ARNETT (née GRANT,) Doris Angelina was born December 1, 1906 in Souris, Manitoba. In 1923 her father moved his appliance manufacturing business to Winnipeg. Doris attended Wesley College, then part of the University of Manitoba, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1927. She played competitive ice hockey for the university women's team, and was an avid tennis player. After university, Doris worked for the Royal Bank of Canada where she met Lincoln R. NEWMAN, also of Winnipeg. They married in 1934. During the Second World War, his career took them, and their two sons, to Calgary and Toronto, and, at the end of the war, to England where Linc ran Royal Bank of Canada's London office and Doris re-established the family. In 1950 they returned to Canada to live in Montreal. After her husband's death in 1955, Doris returned to Winnipeg with family. She became an active member of the University Women's Club. In 1963, Doris married H.T. (Ted) MILLMAN, a widower, engineer, and builder of Canada Safeway stores across Western Canada. After their marriage, his three children became an important part of her life. Doris maintained her home for nearly two decades after Ted's death in 1984. Just three months ago, she moved successfully to an apartment at Lindenwood Manor, where she was happy. While highly capable and independent, Doris always appreciated the care and support of her sister, Frances BOWLES, and her brother-in-law, the late Richard S. BOWLES, former Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba; and since Ted MILLMAN's death, the continued devotion of his youngest child, Alison KENNEDY, whom Doris raised as her own daughter. Doris is also survived by her sons, print journalist Roger NEWMAN (Janice,) Gimli, Manitoba journalist and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster, Don NEWMAN, (Shannon DAY,) Ottawa, Ontario; stepsons, architect Hartley Vance MILLMAN (Claudia,) Ottawa, and retired school principal Bob MILLMAN (Linda CHERNENKOFF,) Winnipeg; sisters-in- law Joyce NEWMAN and Bernie ARNETT, Winnipeg; ten grandchildren; ten great-grandchildren and numerous also treasured nieces and nephews. Her memorial service was held in Winnipeg, Wednesday, March 19th, at Westminster United Church where Doris was a member for nearly 40 years. She died on her way to a church service. Doris was cremated and buried at Brookfield Cemetery between her beloved husbands. She was also predeceased by her cherished parents and brothers Tom and Sheldon ARNETT; brothers- and sisters-in-law; daughter-in-law Audrey-Ann NEWMAN and grand_son Lincoln Taylor NEWMAN. Doris Angelina Arnett Newman MILLMAN will be remembered by her family as a cheerful, positive, intelligent, independent and nurturing person. She was caring and compassionate no matter what the circumstances. In lieu of flowers, donations in Doris Millman's memory may be made to the Lincoln Taylor Newman Bursary Fund to assist promising students in need; cheques payable to Queen's University, and sent to the attention of the L.T. Newman Fund, Queen's Office of Advancement, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6.
''Love never ends.'' (1 Corinthians 13: 8)

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ARNOLD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-23 published
Barry BLENKINSOP
By Jeff ARNOLD Friday, May 23, 2003 - Page A20
Husband, father, grandfather, son, brother, friend. Born February 7, 1944, in Brantford, Ontario Died March 31 in Burlington, Ontario, from complications of cancer, aged 59.
I first met Barry in the summer of 1986 at the city morgue in Toronto. Not the usual place to meet someone who will forever change your life. In a barren police office late one afternoon, Barry walked in to see me dressed in scrubs, white rubber boots and a white plastic apron speckled with red.
Barry was a unique person in a unique occupation. I was a naive university student exploring a future career in forensic pathology. There was an instant connection. Not only did we just happen to grow up in the same town of Brantford, Ontario, but the person who gave me my initial training in autopsy techniques was the same person with whom Barry saw his first autopsy. Small world.
Barry BLENKINSOP is a legend. For most of his career, he worked as the supervisor of the pathologists' assistants in the Forensic Pathology Unit at the Office of the Chief Coroner. Most people of significance in the forensic business in Ontario (police, coroners, forensic pathologists), had heard of him.
Barry had extensive experience in the field, having assisted with approximately 24,000 autopsies -- an major accomplishment. This ultimately lead him to become the manager of the Forensic Pathology Unit two years ago.
Barry was a true humanitarian; he lived to serve the public. Over the course of his 27 years of public service with the Coroner's Office, Barry sat down with, and spoke to, hundreds or perhaps thousands of grieving family members who were left with the unpleasant task of attending the Coroner's Office to identify loved ones. For so many of them, Barry made this necessity a much softer experience. His gentle voice and quiet demeanour calmed many a crying soul. Much of the time, his efforts went unnoticed, yet those who have experienced his soft hand on their shoulder or had their tears wiped away by him could attest to his kindness.
Barry, a man of many talents, could seemingly could fix anything. His flowerbeds and his lawn were immaculate. If anything needed to be constructed, Barry would build it; every corner was perfect, every nail in its place. It was construction that was built to last. Barry built a goldfish pond on his backyard deck and raised goldfish for fun.
There was always an air of silent confidence about him. Barry was an avid reader and, as a result, was a well-rounded conversationalist. His wife Nancy and children meant everything to him. He adored his two grandchildren Sarah and Nicholas; they loved their Papa and were blessed with many visits from him.
Barry had his hand in the training of countless medical students and pathology residents over the years.
Back in 1986, he took me under his wing and mentored me; I became his shadow for many, many years. His knowledge, motivation and expert use of a scalpel in the autopsy room were awe-inspiring. He is, in my opinion, the master in the world of forensics. I believe many would agree.
For some, Barry was not easy to work for because of his enormously high standards, but in the medico-legal world, a precise and honest work ethic is essential for success.
I was privileged with being trained by the best of the best, and I am so grateful. Having worked elbow-to-elbow with him for so many years, I owe it to Barry to pick up where he left off, and am determined not to let him down. His shoes will be difficult to fill, but I will try.
Barry's thoughtfulness, expertise and love will be sadly missed by all.
Jeff ARNOLD is Barry's friend and colleague.

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ARNOLD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
KNOLL, Francis Aileen
Passed away peacefully at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto of cancer and heart complications on July 17, 2003, at age 69. Frances is survived by her brothers Alan (Catherine) and Gerald (Fay,) her sisters Madeleine ARNOLD and Catherine CHAPUT (Armand) and many loving nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her brothers Jack, Jim and George, and her sister Mary Louise. Frances made the most of her dynamic personality and keen intelligence, following many pursuits over her career. Born in Vermilion, Alberta, she graduated from the University of Alberta at age 19 with a degree in psychology, after which she became a caseworker with the Catholic Children's Aid Society. This work led her to pursue a Master of Social Work at the University of Ottawa, which she obtained in 1961. After working for another 10 years in the family service field, Frances accepted the position of Assistant Professor in the faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, a position she held for eight years. Frances then attended Osgoode Hall Law School, from which she graduated in 1982, and was called to the Bar in Ontario two years later. From that point on, Frances used her varied background to work extensively with not-for-profit organizations in a wide variety of ways, reviewing operations and complaints, frequently acting as Interim Director, and becoming a Family Court judge, until her retirement in 2001. Throughout her life, Frances made many, many Friends. She was always a much sought-after dinner companion, cherished the arts, travelled extensively, and truly loved life. Her Friends and family remember Frances as someone who would always tell it like it was, while somehow managing to put a light-hearted spin on even the most serious of matters. The family wishes to express their heartfelt thanks to the teams at Mount Sinai and Princess Margaret Hospitals. A memorial service for Frances, which will be announced, will take place in the coming weeks.

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ARNOLD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
A world-class forensic scientist
Expert in hair and fibre analysis and DNA techniques helped revolutionized police investigations worldwide
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- A simple demonstration using a red pullover and an ultraviolet light during one of the United State's most infamous murder cases helped cement Barry GAUDETTE's reputation as an internationally renowned forensic scientist.
While testifying as an expert witness during the 1981 trial of Wayne WILLIAMS for the murder of several black children in Atlanta, Mr. GAUDETTE asked members of the jury to pass the sweater back and forth. Then he switched off the lights in the courtroom and shone an ultraviolet light on the jury members, revealing fibres from the pullover all over them..
His testimony made a strong connection between carpet fibres from Mr. WILLIAMS's residences and vehicles, and fibres found on several of the young victims, including some whose bodies were found submerged in water. Soon after, Mr. WILLIAMS was convicted as the first black serial killer in the U.S.
"It was a graphic, innovative and very compelling demonstration that showed how fibre transfer worked, and it led to a conviction," said Skip PALENIK, a forensic scientist and president of Microtrace in Chicago, who was involved in the WILLIAMS trial.
"Barry's demonstration helped the jury buy into the theory of fibre transfer... they were hostile to the idea that a black man could kill other blacks, but it tied WILLIAMS to the victims. It was the kind of demonstration that brought science home to a jury.'' Mr. GAUDETTE, a native of Edmonton, died in Ottawa on October 1 after a brief battle with multiple myeloma. He was At the time of the Atlanta child-murders case, Mr. GAUDETTE, a forensic scientist by training, was an expert in hair and fibre analysis. Later, he would help implement the use of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police laboratories across Canada. His findings in hair and fibre analysis and his legwork in DNA helped revolutionize police investigative tools in Canada and around the world, so much so that his work became instrumental in tracking down society's most feared criminals.
Born in Edmonton on April 2, 1947, the oldest of six children, Mr. GAUDETTE received an honours bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969 and that year was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to work as a forensic scientist in its hair and fibre section in Edmonton. In 1971 he married Leslie Ann CLARK, whom he'd met while the pair worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., in Pinawa, Manitoba
He worked for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Edmonton until 1980, during which time he wrote a groundbreaking paper and published various research articles on the high probability that human scalp hair comparisons could be used to link persons to crimes. "His work proved hair comparisons were even more conclusive than blood," said Ms. GAUDETTE, an epidemiologist for Health Canada in Ottawa.
"Barry showed for the first time scientifically that human hair comparisons were a legitimate type of examination to pursue. His work put what had been conventional wisdom onto a scientific footing," adds Mr. PALENIK, whose company provides expert scientific analysis and consultation in the area of small-particle analysis.
After undergoing a year's training with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in hair and fibre analysis, Mr. GAUDETTE was accredited in 1970 as an expert witness and often testified in court cases in Edmonton and later across Canada and in the United States. In 1980, he was transferred to Ottawa to be the chief scientist for hair and fibre analysis at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's central forensic laboratory.
"Barry developed the hair and fibre field and brought it to prominence in the world arena," said John BOWEN, chief scientific officer for Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa, who was trained in hair and fibre analysis by Mr. GAUDETTE in the mid-1980s.
"He was an individual with a lot of vision, a world-class expert in his field.'' In the late 1980s, Mr. GAUDETTE envisioned the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science. He helped implement the technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada and worked to promote the national DNA databank legislation that came into force in 1997.
"Barry did not invent DNA testing," said Mr. PALENIK, "but he saw that it was a powerful tool that could give investigators an ultimate kind of identification. Blood, semen and hair were good, but he recognized that DNA was as good as a fingerprint. He was the one who said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police should put all of its resources into developing DNA as a forensic tool. He said 'let's not waste time on our old ways.' "
It's no stretch, said Mr. PALENIK, to link Mr. GAUDETTE's work in DNA to the conviction of many criminals linked to crimes by their DNA and exoneration of others whose DNA did not match DNA samples taken from crime scenes.
"Barry GAUDETTE made a large contribution to the DNA business because it has significantly changed the investigation procedures in policing," said John ARNOLD, chief scientist for the Ottawa-based Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which was set up to develop tools for use by police.
"Today, they are solving cases that could never have been solved before without this kind of technology."
In 1999, Mr. GAUDETTE became manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, where his innovative ways continued. Before retiring in 2002, he helped develop a website, scheduled to be up and running next year, to provide Web-based training for police. He was also involved in developing a cross-Canada standard for protective equipment worn by police. The standard is expected to be in place by the end of 2004, Mr. ARNOLD said.
Even when he was in the twilight years of his career, Mr. GAUDETTE had an appetite for fieldwork and was never content to sit in a cushy office chair and watch his subordinates do all of the work.
"When some people get into management they don't want to work. They want to be the one who directs it. That wasn't Barry," Mr. ARNOLD said.
His stellar reputation led to a position on the U.S./Canada bilateral counterterrorism research and development committee from 1999 to 2002. He received numerous accolades for his pioneering forensic work. In 1996, he was awarded the government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence, and in 2003 a Golden Jubilee Medal.
Friends and colleagues said that away from the job, Mr. GAUDETTE enjoyed time with his family and took part in community affairs.
Mr. GAUDETTE leaves his wife Leslie and children Lisa, 18, and Darrell, 22.

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