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"EDW" 2003 Obituary


EDWARDS 

EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
WRIGHT, W. J. Chaplin ''Bud''
Died of heart failure in Naples, Florida on March 25th, 2003, in his 81st year. He was the son of Alma CHAPLIN and Edward E. H. WRIGHT of St. Catharines. He was born and raised in St. Catharines, with summers spent at their cottage in Niagara-on-the-Lake. He attended Ridley College and graduated in Chemical Engineering from U. of T. Bud served with the submarine chasers, the corvette arm of the navy in World War 2.
As a chemical engineer, he worked for Stelco, Dupont and Galtex. Then he worked for over 25 years with Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor, a career that became his real love.
He was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by his wife of 53 years, Jane MURRAY, their four children: son Ken and wife Jill; three daughters, Marsha and Don SADOWAY, Ellen and Paul EDWARDS, and Leah Ann; by his sister Briar SMITH, wife of the late Larry SMITH, as well as three young grandchildren, Sam, Nathan and Caaryn. Bud is predeceased by his sister, Mary Elizabeth HUME.
Next to his family was his love for a good competitive game of squash, tennis and bridge. Many happy family holidays were spent at the cottage in Southampton, and that is where his final resting place will be.
Bud led his family by example with uncompromising integrity, loyalty, humour, a zest for life, and love.
Cremation took place in Naples. A Memorial Service will be announced at a later date, to be held at Saint Mark's Church, Niagara-on-the-lake. Donations to Historic Saint Mark's Anglican Church (est. 1792) Niagara-on-the-Lake or Arthritis Society.

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
REIMER, Waldemar (Wally) H., A.A.C.I.
Passed away peacefully in his sleep, at Victoria General Hospital, in Winnipeg on April 7, 2003, after a lengthy and courageous struggle with many health issues.
Beloved husband of Mary TOEWS for 50 years; dear father of Henry (who died in infancy), Hélène (Peters) and Tim Green Mississauga, Paul and Brenda REIMER of Calgary, Judy and Vic WARKENTIN and Margaret and Jeff HARASYM of Winnipeg. Opi of Lora and Neil PETERS, Paul WARKENTIN, Andrew REIMER and Stephen HARASYM. Brother to Elvera and Gerry THIESSEN; John and Annelies REIMER, Ruth and Nelson EDWARDS and Elaine REIMER. Predeceased by his parents Henry REIMER, Sara (BRAUN) Reimer PANKRATZ, step-father, Nicholas PANKRATZ, brother Victor, sisters Annie POETKER and Mary WILLMS, brother-in-law Henry POETKER.
Formerly of Waterloo, Wally was a well known member of the business community through his years at Mutual Life, various real estate and development companies and then for 26 years, as President of W.H. Reimer Limited.
Funeral services were held in Winnipeg on Friday April 11, 2003. A memorial service to celebrate Wally's life will be held at W-K United Mennonite Church in Waterloo, on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at 10: 30 a.m. A time to visit with the family will follow the service. Interment will take place at Mount Hope Cemetery, Waterloo.
Donations to the Waterloo Adult Recreation Centre, Mennonite Central Committee, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Lung Association of Waterloo Region would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
EDWARDS, Barbara Grace (née WILLIAMS)
Died peacefully at the Jewish General Hospital on Thursday, July 17, 2003, in her seventy-third year. Beloved daughter of the late Aston and the late Isolyn WILLIAMS. Beloved wife of Alfred Barington (Barrie). Beloved mother of David Gregory. Beloved sister of Dorothy (in Switzerland). Predeceased by her sisters Pearl and Mizpah and her brothers Buzzie and Percy. Special thanks to the staff of the Jewish General Hospital for their care and compassion. Visitation with urn on Monday, July 21st from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Mount Royal Funeral Complex, 1297 Chemin de la Fôret, Outremont (514) 279-6540. Memorial service in the chapel of the complex on Tuesday, July 22nd at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Your condolences to the family may be sent through www.everlastinglifestories.com.

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
Nicole BERUBE
By Rose DESHAW Tuesday, August 26, 2003 - Page A22
Writer, editor, photographer, French teacher. Born June 4, 1949, in Gaspé, Quebec Died June 17 in Kingston, Ontario, of cancer, age 54.
'They said I was Dead!" Nicole told me several years ago, outraged that a local paper had reported as "posthumous" her receipt of a special medal for outstanding volunteer work. This meant that she was not invited to the award ceremony. She phoned the paper after receiving several frantic messages from Friends but they declined to put in, as she phrased it, "an oopsie."
An editor herself for many years of the biweekly L'Informel, serving the French community in Kingston, Ontario, her vision for the paper grew daily. Wanting it completely professional, Nicole taught herself the most up-to-date graphics programs, acquired a scanner and digital camera, upgraded her photographic skills to artist level -- and put it all into the paper. She fought for a bigger budget that could cover an outside print run, and more pages in order to profile the work of French schoolchildren whom she saw as the future of the community.
Eighteen-hour days were common. Nicole never had enough time for all the travel, Friends, projects and writing she had planned. She co-authored, with her friend Viv EDWARDS in England, a bilingual children's book series, including the title Who Stole Granny? She promoted their work whenever there was opportunity. She also gave workshops as a teaching professional when she wasn't hard at work in the language department of the Royal Military College. The success of her young officer cadets was everything to her she was always pushing and cajoling them, inviting them over for extra sessions at her cosy little duplex that she'd decorated with posters and ornaments from her travels.
She mined popular culture for material that might make speaking the language irresistible to her students; dating behaviour, strange local customs, sports cars, food, until she became a walking encyclopedia of odd facts in French that might tempt a hitherto unresponsive cadet to try a little harder. How she suffered as they struggled. The week of their oral exams by phone was migraine time for her. "I have no other way to teach but involved," she said once.
Although usually colourfully dressed in an array of saucy T-shirts and a denim jacket that matched her big blue eyes, Nicole could dress in the manner of the Queen (minus the hat) when it was required. Living on her own as a single woman with a cat, she lavished attention on her nephew and niece, children of her younger sister and only living sibling out of four children.
She travelled back and forth on holidays to the small Quebec town of Gaspé where she had grown up, where her family had been clockmakers and jewellers for generations. Sent for her public education to the sisters at the convent, Nicole had a lonely childhood. It wasn't until enrolment at Laval University in Quebec City that she came into her own. Taking part in the student protests that followed the October Crisis, she told me once about hobbling away because she had lost a shoe as the police bore down on them. But by the time she reached Royal Military College, she had achieved the highest security clearance, no longer a radical (if indeed she had ever been) but a teacher whose first love was the young faces in her classes.
One of her delights was a cadet from Bosnia, struggling to learn both English and French at the same time. "She has a bright future," Nicole said in May, after the cadet had taken her out to dinner in gratitude for all the help and encouragement that had enabled her to successfully complete her exams. Nicole did not know that her own future was near its end. On June 10, she went into the hospital for routine tests and died unexpectedly from colon cancer seven days later.

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
The 'godfather' of Ottawa's retail auto industry
After more than three decades of hard work, he went on to become the first full-time executive director of the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, October 14, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- During a career in the auto industry that spanned more than 50 years, Don MANN was tagged with his share of complimentary nicknames. As a Datsun dealer in Ottawa in the 1960s, 70s and 80s, he was known as "Don Mann, your Datsun Mann," a phrase used in his dealership's advertising.
Later, as executive director of the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association, he was often referred to as the "godfather" of the city's retail auto industry and an "ambassador" for Ottawa's new-car dealers.
When he first started in the automotive business, working with Industrial Acceptance Corporation to help dealers finance their inventory of vehicles, he had a reputation as hard-working, honest and friendly. Mr. MANN died in Ottawa on August 12. He was 76.
Born in Toronto on October 16, 1926, he spent about 15 years working for Industrial Acceptance Corporation in Sudbury, Sarnia, London and Ottawa before deciding to go into the car business for himself. In 1969, he opened Don Mann Datsun Limited in Ottawa. He sold out to an Ottawa General Motors dealer in 1983 and after a brief retirement, joined the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association, becoming the first full-time executive director of the group, which was formed in 1957 with about 25 dealers and now has more than 60 members.
"He was a great ambassador for new car dealers in Ottawa," said Pat McGURN, president of Surgenor Pontiac Buick GMC. "He was the guy who lobbied with a local college to establish training programs for our employees when there was a shortage of qualified people." Over the years, he secured more than $250,000 in dealership training dollars from government, said Mr. McGURN.
"I determine a need, find a trainer, agree upon a program, then I go to the dealers," Mr. MANN once told an interviewer, adding that dealers pay for the programs because there's less training money available from government.
In his capacity as executive director of the car-dealers association, Mr. MANN also worked with the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board to ensure dealers provided healthy and safe working conditions. He worked closely with Algonquin College in Ottawa and Georgian College in Barrie, Ontario, to set up financial awards for top graduates. In 2002, a local apprenticeship committee established a Don Mann Award, given yearly to a major contributor to Ottawa's apprenticeship program.
"Don was the glue that kept things together," said Mr. McGURN. "He made decisions that have made dealers in Ottawa stronger and made things better for consumers." Mr. MANN, who worked as a police officer in Toronto for six years before switching to the automobile business, helped launch the Ottawa-Hull International Auto Show about 20 years ago and over the past two decades built its profile to the point that it now attracts 35,000 visitors. Money raised through the show helps fund training programs, said Mr. McGURN.
Mr. MANN was known for his solid grasp of issues that affect the auto industry at the dealers' level and at the legislative level where laws are constantly changing, said Mr. McGURN, who notes that Mr. MANN's leadership and organizational skills kept local dealers working as a coherent group.
Ever the diplomat, at one point he convinced Ottawa's fiercely competitive car dealers to close on Saturdays during summer long weekends so staff could enjoy a holiday like everyone else. It was also his job to keep dealers current on legislation and guidelines dealing with used-car sales, consumer protection and advertising.
"His forte as executive director of the Car Dealers Association was his access to politicians, and on the education side, his contact with car dealers," said his son Brian of Ottawa. "He knew little about cars when he first started... It took long hours of hard work to build that knowledge.
"He was a great one for the job, he saw his role as an ambassador."
Mr. MANN was also known as someone who could bring people together to get a job done, said his son, whether it was organizing dealers to speak with one voice to governments, or to pull together a golf tournament at the Ottawa Hunt and Golf Club.
Fellow club member Gordon EDWARDS remembers Mr. MANN as an adept snooker player and golfer with great patience.
"He was able to concentrate well, ... he was deliberate and careful, always calculating each shot to make sure he got it right," said Mr. EDWARDS, who played in Mr. MANN's foursome for 17 years.
Mr. MANN leaves wife Verna and children Maureen, Brian and Bruce.

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Two charged after man dies in shooting
By Erin POOLEY, Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page A16
Toronto police have charged two men, 17 and 22, with second-degree murder in the death of a Brampton man outside a Scarborough townhouse on Thursday.
Police were called to 110 Empringham Dr. around 2: 30 p.m., after gunshots were heard. Andred EDWARDS, 24, was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics.
Charged is Kalito SMITH, 22, of Toronto, and a 17-year-old.

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EDWARDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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