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"ING" 2003 Obituary


INGERSOLL  INGHAM  INGLE  INGLESON  INGLIS  INGO  INGRAM 

INGERSOLL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-20 published
Died This Day -- Laura SECORD, 1868
Monday, October 20, 2003 - Page R7
Farmer and heroine of Upper Canada, born Laura INGERSOLL on September 13, 1775, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.; on the night of June 22, 1813, overheard two American officers billeted in her house near Queenston Heights discuss plan to attack a nearby British post; sometimes leading a cow as a decoy, walked 30 kilometres through American lines to warn British forces; U.S. mounted attack only to be ambushed and captured by British and loyal Iroquois died in Chippawa, near Niagara Falls.

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INGHAM o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
Karen Louise SHAW (née KING)
Passed away peacefully at Gore Bay, Ontario on February 16, 2003, age 59.
Loving wife of Robert D. SHAW for 33 years and mother of Dara (husband Richard BRACHMAN), Debbie (husband Kyle BRENTNELL), and Diana (fiancé Scott INGHAM).
Predeceased by parents Kenneth and Dorothy KING and brother Harold (wife Bonnie KING). Sister to Alan KING (Barbara), Betty Ann HOUDE (Garry) and Candace INNES (Eric.) Sister-in-law to Norman SHAW and Barbara BILLMAN (Arlo.) Aunt, friend, and role model to many. Karen possessed a passion for education working with Okanagan University College in Kelowna, BC (1996-98), Cambrian College (1982-1996), and Sudbury High School as a teacher (1967-72). She earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education from Michigan State University in 1997. Karen served the Sudbury community in many roles as: Councillor, Regional Municipality and City of Sudbury (1991-97), Governor, Laurentian University (1985-96), President, Sudbury Chamber of Commerce (1993-94), President, Sudbury Business and Professional Women's Club (1986-88), and Trustee, Sudbury Board of Education (1976-85).
Her family greatly appreciates the loving care provided by the staff at Manitoulin Lodge.
A memorial service was held on Thursday, February 20 in Sudbury. Karen's life will be celebrated with a memorial service at St. Francis of Assisi in Mindemoya later in the summer.

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INGHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
BROWN, Rosemary
It is with profound sadness that we announce the sudden passing of the Honourable Dr. Rosemary BROWN, P.C., O.C., O.B.C. She died peacefully at home on April 26, 2003. She is survived by her loving husband, Dr. William T. BROWN; three children, Cleta, Gary and Jonathan; seven grandchildren, Katherine, Ashton, William, Giselle, Jonathan, Jackson and Louis and many other cherished relatives and Friends. Born in Kingston, Jamaica on June 17, 1930, she graduated from Wolmer's School and then came to Canada in 1951 to study at McGill University in Montreal where she completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1955. After moving to Vancouver, Rosemary completed Bachelor and Masters degrees in Social Work at the University of British Columbia. Rosemary BROWN was a member of the Privy Council, Officer of the Order of Canada, Commander of the Order of Distinction of Jamaica, Member of the Order of British Columbia, the recipient of 15 honourary doctorates, and was a Member of the Legislative Assembly in British Columbia from 1972 to 1986. She was also President of her favourite charity MATCH International, an organization dedicated to the empowerment of woman in developing nations. Rosemary was a founder of a number of socially progressive organizations including the National Black Coalition, the British Columbia Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, the Vancouver Status of Women, Multilingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities, the Canadian Women's Foundation, The Vancouver Crisis Centre and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Donations may be made to MATCH International. Funeral Service will be held at St. Andrew's Wesley United Church, Burrard and Nelson, Vancouver on Monday, May 5th at 1: 30 p.m., Bishop Michael INGHAM, Dean Peter ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, and the Reverend William ROBERTS officiating. Kearney Funeral Services 604-736-0268.

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INGHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
INGHAM, Albert
Ab died suddenly on Sunday, June 29, 2003 in his 86th year, on a fine summer day at the family cottage at Lime Lake, a bright and active man. Beloved husband of Anne (KUZ) and father of Paula BUTTERFIELD and husband David, Dyan JONES and partner Randy MARTIN, Thomas INGHAM and daughter-in-law Janet WHITE/WHYTE. His grandchildren Isaiah WALTERS, Rachel WALTERS, Adam BUTTERFIELD, Jonathan BUTTERFIELD and Samuel INGHAM will always cherish their Friendship with him. Survived by his brother Robert INGHAM and brother-in-law Walter KUZ and dear nieces and nephews.
A fine man of jovial spirit, he embodied so much to be admired. May we all live such a full and loving life. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.) Weston, from 6-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service in the Ward Chapel on Friday, July 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Prospect Cemetery. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Breast And Gynecology Research Teams, would be appreciated.

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INGLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
INGLE, Nita M. (née GUILBAULT)
Died peacefully surrounded by family at Toronto General Hospital on Friday September 5, 2003, in her 76th year. Nita is survived by husband Lorne INGLE; children Richard JESSUP, Pat Penner (Tim), Berta JESSUP- RAMSAY (Rob), Barb JESSUP- GENEST (Paul), Bill JESSUP (Brenda,) and step-children Barb STROHBACH (Herb,) Margot INGLE (Jack Hayes,) and Roger INGLE (Shiela.) Nita will also be lovingly remembered by 13 grandchildren. Following her career as a special education teacher, Nita's concern and desire to help others continued through her participation and leadership in volunteer organizations. Nita's love of life and laughter will be missed by all. In accordance with her wishes there will be no service. A celebration of Nita's life will be held at a later date. The family wishes to express sincere thanks to Karen, May and the staff at The Briton House for their support and assistance. If desired memorial donations may be made to a charity of your choice.

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INGLESON o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2003-10-24 published
Highway crash claims two lives
Two Thornbury-area men are dead and four others seriously injured, after a two vehicle collision occurred this past stormy Monday night.
The Collingwood Blue Mountains Ontario Provincial Police said shortly before 9 p.m., they believe a 1977 Chevrolet Nova crossed the centre line of Highway 26 west of Craigleith, before colliding head-on with a 1999 Dodge Caravan.
The driver of the Nova 33-year-old Trevor SQUANCE of Thornbury, and his passenger, James SIMONEK, 42, also of Thornbury, died at the scene.
The Caravan's driver, 39-year-old Colleen MORRISON of the Town of the Blue Mountains, and passengers Allan Paul INGLESON, 50, Evan GOSTICK, 15, and Travis GOSTICK, were taken from the scene to the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital by ambulance.
Evan GOSTICK was later transferred to St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, while Travis, 13, was taken to The Hospital for Sick Children, also in Toronto.
The Ontario Provincial Police said that part of the wreckage from the crash landed in a nearby ditch, cutting a natural gas line.
The residents of a nearby home were evacuated for a short time, as a precaution, until a gas company crew capped the severed line.
The Town of the Blue Mountains Fire Department responded to assist with the removal of the victims and stood by, while the gas leak was capped.
Autopsies on both SQUANCE and SIMONEK were scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. Results have not yet been made public.
Police say crash scene investigators are trying to determine if speed or alcohol were contributing factors in the collision.
Anyone who may have witnessed the incident, or who has information about the collision, is asked to call the Collingwood-Blue Mountains Ontario Provincial Police detachment at 445-4321.
- Staff, Page 1

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INGLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
CRASHLEY, Lt. Col. J. Douglas, C.M., C.D.
Died Thursday, March 27th, 2003 at the Doctor's Hospital in Nassau, Bahamas. Born in Toronto May 5, 1921. son of the late John Willard and Doris Sanderson CRASHLEY. Predeceased by his beloved wife Elizabeth INGLIS. Dear brother of Doris Crashley PHILLIPS (Brian) of Kennebunk, Maine. He will also be sadly missed by his nieces and nephews. He was a dear friend of Colleen CARMICHAEL and family.
He served with the Governor General's Horse Guards from 1940 was on active service with them from 1941-1945 in England and Italy. He commanded the regiment from 1952-1954. The motto of the regiment, Nulli Secondus (second to none), aptly describes him. He was Past Chairman of the Governor General's Horse Guards Board of Trustees.
He served as Division Chairman for the United Appeal for four years, Past Chairman of the City of Toronto Planning Board, Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board and the City of Toronto Redevelopment Advisory Council. Past President of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto 1974-1975 and headed a delegation of 100 members on a tour of Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries. Past President of the Art Gallery of Ontario 1972-1974 and Chairman of the King Tutankhamen Exhibition Committee in 1979.
He was the owner of Elgin Motors, Walker House Hotel, Ascot Hotel and Central Precision, and a major shareholder of many other corporations.
In 1978, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada. He was most proud of this honour.
He was a member of the Toronto Club, The York Club, Lyford Cay Club, Royal Canadian Military Institute and The Badminton and Racquet Club.
He will be remembered for his foresight, meticulous attention to detail and business acumen. He had the capacity for making strong personal relationships with many people.
The funeral service will be held at The Cathedral Church of St. James, 65 Church Street, Toronto, at 11: 00 a.m. on Monday, April In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation to the Governor General's Horse Guards Foundation, 137 Hall Street, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 4N9 or to a charity of your choice would be most appreciated.

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INGLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
'Nobody beats Arthur'
Victoria native left mark on Ottawa's business scene, while setting swimming records when he was over 70
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- When Arthur INGLIS moved to Ottawa from Victoria in the late 1960s, his goal was to leave his mark on the nation's capital. By all accounts, he succeeded, both in the world of business and in the swimming pool.
"When he arrived he thought he could make a difference," said his partner of 20 years Kimberly CROSS. " The place was a wasteland back then, but he did manage to leave an imprint."
Mr. INGLIS, who as recently as May set a world swimming record, died on September 1. He as 71.
After moving to Ottawa, Mr. INGLIS, who was born in Victoria on March 28, 1932, worked as director of store design for Hudson's Bay Co. and redesigned a handful of department stores purchased from their local owner by the Bay.
In 1976, he started two Vanilla Boutique clothing stores and later operated the Ecco Restaurant in downtown Ottawa. He founded the Mags and Fags newsstand that same year after he realized Ottawa didn't have an outlet with the variety of magazines and newspapers available in New York or London. The business also included Immigration and Naturalization Service News Service, which distributes newspapers and magazines to Ottawa's business and government sectors.
With a reputation as an innovative member of Ottawa's business community, Mr. INGLIS and a partner built Mags and Fags into one of the biggest newsstands in Canada, said Mr. CROSS, who added that local media individuals often visited the Elgin Street shop.
During the early 1980s, Mr. INGLIS and a business partner designed a bar named Shannon's in honour of Shannon TWEED, Miss Ottawa Valley of 1977 and Playboy Magazine's 1982 Playmate of the Year. TWEED, partner of Gene SIMMONS, bassist for rock band KISS, named her dog Vanilla after Mr. INGLIS's women's fashion shops.
His boutiques carried innovative lines of clothing from France and Italy that couldn't be found elsewhere in Ottawa. His Ecco restaurant and club was a downtown hotspot known for its elegant yet homey setting.
"It was hot, hot, hot with a library and outdoor terrace on the second floor, like something you'd find on 3rd Avenue in New York," Mr. CROSS said. "It was the place where all of the city's movers and shakers went, real estate people, fashion people -- you name it."
Mr. INGLIS and a partner also designed and introduced several Ottawa shopping centres to the sales kiosks that are now commonplace in most malls.
In 2000, when Mr. INGLIS was 68 and still operating the newsstand, his life took a dramatic turn because of cholesterol and blood-pressure problems. His doctors placed him on medication but instead of relying on pills, he quit drinking, adopted a healthier diet and started swimming and weight-training.
In 2002, he sold his share in Mags and Fags to concentrate on travel and competitive swimming, which he had excelled at as youngster and into his teens.
Mr. INGLIS's athletic prowess in his younger days also included skating with the Ice Capades, touring North America with his sister May in the 1950s.
To pursue his interest in swimming and to improve his fitness, Mr. INGLIS joined the Technosport masters swim and triathlon team in Ottawa and was soon setting Canadian and world swimming records in the 70-and-over age group. As his health problems eased, he challenged the best in the world in masters swimming in various locales, including New Zealand and Hawaii.
When he died, he held 17 Canadian or Ontario records in backstroke, breaststroke, freestyle and individual medley, including all Canadian backstroke records in all distances in the 70 to 74 age group, said teammate Pat NIBLETT, who keeps track of records set by members of the Technosport team. Mr. INGLIS was also a member of an Ontario swim relay team that set a world record in New Zealand in 2002.
Ms. NIBLETT, who often travelled to swim meets with Mr. INGLIS, remembers her teammate as a "tall slim man with the twinkling eyes and wonderful sense of humour. I only had the privilege of knowing Arthur for three short years. I felt as if I had known him for a lifetime. There is a saying in our house that 'nobody beats Arthur.' This is true of everything that Arthur did."
At the Canadian National Masters Swim Championships in Montreal in May, Mr. INGLIS broke his own 200-metre backstroke record and set Canadian records in the 100 and 200 individual medley events.
Technosport coach Duane JONES, who was among those shocked by the incredibly fit Mr. INGLIS's death, said the swimmer worked out about five times a week.
"When we first met, he was 30 pounds overweight, he was not a healthy eater and he was lethargic. But soon after, he was setting records; when he was 71-years-old he had the body of a 35-year-old. He paid attention to detail and did his workouts, swimming, biking and weight-training consistently.
"The first time he dove into the water I could not believe how beautiful his strokes cut the water. I've coached more than 6,000 athletes during the past 35 years and have never seen a guy like Arthur INGLIS."
Ramona FIEBIG, manager of Mags and Fags for more than 14 years, said Mr. INGLIS was a dedicated businessman who did his best to ensure the newsstand had the best selection of titles in the city. He often showed up for work on weekends as early as 3 a.m.
"There are thousands of titles in the store. It was no small chore to keep on top of what was new, to find new magazines and locate suppliers."
To the day he died, Mr. INGLIS was an innovator, Mr. CROSS said, adding that as his health deteriorated, he wanted to try a novel drug treatment to prolong his life.
"After his stroke, the options were paralysis on his left side or trying a new drug," Mr. CROSS said, adding that the side effect was a 16-per-cent chance he would suffer massive bleeding in his brain. "His feeling was that if he didn't survive, the next person who came down the shoot might have a better chance."

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INGO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
JOHNSON, E.D. Julianna "Julie" (née TOOLE) (March 27, 1912 - November 13, 2003)
Julianna (TOOLE) JOHNSON died comfortably and peacefully at Lake of the Woods District Hospital on November 13th, 2003, age 91½, having lived a full and happy life.
Born March 27, 1912 to George and Eleanor TOOLE, she was a lifetime citizen of Kenora except for her upper schooling years in Toronto (Havergal College graduate with the Herbert Mason Gold Medal for high character, 1931; University of Toronto B.A. 1934) and Vancouver (Vancouver General Hospital, R.N. 1938). She married Larry P. JOHNSON (Johnson's Pharmacy 2nd Street,) on June 28th, 1939. They produced 8 children and had a busy, happy 58 years together.
Julianna was predeceased by her parents, her husband L.P. JOHNSON, brother Laurence (Donalda) TOOLE, brother Michael TOOLE, sons Paul JOHNSON in 1952 and Terry JOHNSON in 1996, great-grand_son John WAGENAAR in 2001. She is lovingly remembered and survived by son Larry (Lyn) JOHNSON, Calgary, daughter-in- law Sue JOHNSON, Kenora, daughter Eleanor (Bill) KYLE, Kenora, daughter Mary Pat (Rob) DICKSON/DIXON, Winnipeg, son Bill (Janet) JOHNSON, Winnipeg, daughter Elizabeth/Honey (Tony) JONES, Mississauga, son Kevin (Deborah) JOHNSON, Calgary; grandchildren from Australia to England to the U.S. and all across Canada -- Peter, Tim, Paul and Stephana, Joe and Jaye, Beth, Mark Johnson, Nancy and Kevin WAGENAAR, Rob and Melissa JOHNSON, Larry and Susan KYLE, Shannon and Phil EDGELL, Dave and Dominique, Brad KYLE, Chris, Susie and Billy DICKSON/DIXON, Diane and Eric JOHNSON, Trevor and Evan JONES, Charlie, George, Andy and Julie JOHNSON; great-granddaughters Hailey JOHNSON, Beth WAGENAAR, Ericka EDGELL, Olivia JOHNSON; brother Ned (Anne) TOOLE, Edmonton; sisters-in-law Evelyn INGO and Marjorie Merceline PIGOTT, Vancouver; many kissing cousins, nieces, nephews and Friends.
Julianna's main focus in life was her large family to whom she devoted vast amounts of time and energy. She was a patient, wonderful, caring mother and grandmother, a whiz at accomplishing many tasks in a calm and unflappable manner, an excellent cookie and pie maker, and a gracious hostess. Over the years her fingers were rarely idle as she created items for the Hospital Gift Shop or knitted goods, especially sweaters, for her own family. She was active in the community being a lifetime member of St. Alban's Cathedral and St. Alban's Altar Guild. Of her many volunteer activities she really enjoyed helping children from Kin Valley School at their swimming classes in the (now) Lakeside Inn and delivering Meals on Wheels with daughter Eleanor. She was a member of the Ladies Hospital Auxiliary for many years taking a turn as President. She enjoyed Friendships with many people including her square dancing group and her afternoon Bridge Club with whom she played bridge until she was 89. Truly her favourite time of year was summertime when she loved sharing the family island on Lake of the Woods with her ever growing and changing family. She took great pleasure her whole life long in boat rides, picnics and sunsets on beautiful Lake of the Woods. Julianna will long be remembered as a kind, considerate and dear person.
Immediate cremation has taken place. A memorial service and celebration of her life will be held at St. Alban's Cathedral, 312 Main Street South, Kenora, on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 at 1: 30 p.m. A reception downstairs in the church hall will follow immediately afterwards.
As an expression of sympathy, those who wish may make a donation in Julianna's memory to the Lake of the Woods C.T. Scanner Fund, 21 Sylvan Street West, Kenora, Ontario P9N 3W7 or to St. Alban's Cathedral, 312 Main Street South, Kenora, Ontario P9N 1T2, or to a charity of one's choice.

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INGRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
WANKE, Vera (née BARTHA)
Died peacefully March 19th, 2003, in Toronto, joining the souls of husband Lorand and daughter Andrea. She is remembered with love by daughter, Bea INGRAM, grandchildren Tina, Patrick, Sara, Kate and great-grandchildren Massimo, Talio, Daryl and her relatives in Budapest, Hungary. Her beautiful art, independent spirit, curious intellect, integrity and deep spirituality remain our heritage and inspiration. Memorial service at 1: 30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26th, at St. Monica's Catholic Church, 44 Broadway Avenue, near Yonge. Instead of flowers, donations may be made to Alzheimer Society of Ontario.

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INGRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
LLOYD INGRAM, Nora
1961-2003. Died May 1st, 2003. A bright shining soul has left us. Our sweet Nora who could find such joy in earth's simple treasures and could spread such joy with her special magic and kind heart will be forever missed. She leaves devoted husband Steve INGRAM, mother Betty, sister Cathy (Colleen) and father Clarke and brother Jeff. Her extended family Lucy, Alex, Christine and Dylan will remember her always as will everyone she touched in her short life. A private memorial service will be held at a future date.

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INGRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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