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"OLI" 2003 Obituary


OLIVER  OLIVIER 

OLIVER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
OLIVER
-In loving memory of a dear son Roger, who passed away January 10, 1998.
-Mom and Dad.

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OLIVER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-15 published
OLIVER
-In loving memory of a dear son Roger, who passed away January 10, 1998.
There will always be a heartache
And many a silent tear
But always the precious memories
Of the days when you were here
We hold you close within our hearts
And there you will remain
To walk with us throughout our lives
Until we meet again.
-Mom and Dad.

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OLIVER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Roy Allen GREEN " Squirt"
In loving memory of Roy Allen GREEN on Monday, April 7, 2003,at the age of 54 years.
Cherished husband of Darlene (née OLIVER.) Loved by children Lori and husband Terry CASE of Little Current, Jeff and Tanya of Sault Ste. Marie, Derek and fiancée Lesley of Espanola. Special grandpa of Braedan and Brady CASE. Will be greatly missed by sister Linda and husband Ron BOWERMAN of Sheguiandah, brother Gary and wife Nicole of Little Current, predeceased by sister Norma LLOYD (husband Gerald,) and brother Ronnie (wife Carol WESSEL.) Predeceased by parents Charles and Edna. Fondly remembered by parents-in-law Ting and Pee Wee OLIVER and brothers and sisters-in-law Mike and wife Betty OLIVER, Wanda & husband Lou TROVARELLO, predeceased by Roger OLIVER (wife June.) Uncle to numerous nephews and nieces.
Visitation was from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm Wednesday, April 9, 2003. Funeral Service was held at 2: 00 pm Thursday, April 10, 2003, both at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Little Current.
Cremation with burial in Holy Trinity Cemetery at a later date.

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OLIVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-02 published
Laurence OLIVER
By Catherine OLIVER Friday, May 2, 2003 - Page A22
Born August 3, 1901, in Eniskillen Township, county Lambton, Ontario. Died December 28, 2002, in Petrolia, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 101.
Those of us who were lucky enough to be born in Petrolia, Ontario, or the surrounding area refer to ourselves proudly as "hard-oilers." Laurence was born on a farm on the 12th line of Eniskillen Township he was a real hard-oiler.
He remembered the hard work on the farm, especially pushing the plow up the hills behind the horse. He told me that maybe if the farm had been flatter, he might have stayed on and made his living on the farm. He did like the making of maple syrup in the spring, probably because he had such a sweet tooth. As long as he could drive, he always went to the maple-syrup festival in Alvinston each spring, and would buy big gallon tins of maple syrup to share with us.
He completed Grade 8, but did not go further in school. He worked on the farm and in the 1920s, he was out West on the harvest excursions threshing grain; he also worked on the Great Lakes boats. In 1922 he followed the Petrolia tradition of leaving to look for work in the oil fields and left for California where he remained until 1926 learning to drill for oil.
From 1927 to 1930, he was in Venezuela, where he told me he drilled the third oil well in Lake Maracaibo. At that time, it was quite common for Petrolia men to be overseas in the oil business.
Laurence spent most of the 1930s in Trinidad, also drilling for oil. He was a young man with some money, and I think he enjoyed himself. Margaret McDONALD, who became his wife (and my mother,) visited mutual Friends in Trinidad during this time, and there are some snapshots of the two of them together, looking quite friendly.
During the Second World War, he drilled in Canada, and he remembered the 40-below-zero weather drilling in the open pit iron mines in northern Ontario. They drilled the holes for blasting to get the iron ore out for the war effort.
From 1946 to 1966 he was employed by International Water Supply, drilling for water. He got married in 1946; I was born in 1948. He was briefly in Israel in 1952 but was mostly in Venezuela during the 1950s. My mother and I visited him there three times. During the 1960s he was in Ontario, and retired from International Water Supply in 1966.
After this retirement, the United Church sent him to India for a year to drill water wells as part of a food-production program. I believe it was the only time he had missionary listed as his occupation on a visa. He had short-term jobs in Guyana, Venezuela, and Niger. He finally retired for a second and final time in After this second retirement, he travelled to visit me in exotic spots like Wawa, Ontario, and he also travelled to Las Vegas to gamble; his favourite game was blackjack. He was part of a regular poker game in the back of one of the restaurants in Sarnia for several years. I can well imagine he must have been a good poker player, since the Olivers were not noted for showing emotion. He surprised his physician by recovering almost completely from a broken hip at the age of 93; he continued to walk uptown to the post office and Tim Hortons, with the aid of only a cane. He also continued to drive until he was 96.
Laurence was the cause of a wonderful party for his 100th birthday in August, 2001. We chartered a boat and cruised the St. Clair River with more than 100 Friends and relatives. After the party, he paid me the best possible compliment by telling me it was just like the old days.
My dad was a very honest, hardworking man. As far as we know, he was the last of the drillers who left Petrolia to drill all over the world. Thus his death truly marks the end of an era.
Catherine OLIVER is the daughter of Laurence OLIVER.

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OLIVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
Recollections of an artist whose absence is palpable
By OLIVER Girling, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
Lynn DONOGHUE loved to paint pictures, and her favourite subject was the human form.
A spiritual child of the influential David Mirvish Gallery of the seventies, her work was championed by the gallery's owner as well as its director, Alkis KLONARIDIS, when he later opened on his own. This was noteworthy because the Mirvish Gallery's domain had been modernist, abstract painting and sculpture, to the exclusion of almost everything else.
But Lynn's paintings were a kind of hybrid, marrying the flatness and luminous colour of abstract painting to whimsical representations of the figure and face. For painting in Toronto, this was an important step, a bridge between card-carrying abstractionists like Ric Evans and Jan Poldaas and unabashed figurative artists then just starting, like the ChromaZone and Republic collectives and Joanne Tod. Still, historicism doesn't explain or do justice to the brand new species she invented and practised with lifelong consistency.
The subjects of her pictures seem sort of animated, the result of asymmetries that could only be achieved with a live sitter. Not for her the "95-per-cent Kodak, 5-per-cent art" method (Godard's ironic deflation of cinema's pretensions); unlike other figurative painting contemporaries, her use of photographs as aids was minimal.
The result was people in their gawky particularity who look like they're in the middle of living, rather than idealized, Platonic masks. (Look at her portrait of the company Dancemakers when you're in the lobby of the Premiere Dance Theatre in Toronto).
Lucian FREUD needed four sittings from the Queen for his 6-by-10-inch portrait; Lynn needed at least 20 for her 5-by-6-foot works. I know, because I sat for her twice. The first time, in New York in the eighties, she gave me turquoise pants and punked-out hair in the buttoned-down nineties, I'm more Jimmy Olson, cub reporter. Both were exaggerations; she relished using clothing as a sensual and imagist extension of personality.
The experience was energizing and relaxing. Talking non-stop as she painted, and constantly requiring a response, there was no danger of my going slack-jawed (this may be another part of the animation you see in her paintings).
Erudite about art history, she talked about artists and shows, "the biz," she called it; gossiped big-time; interspersed advice recipes; homilies. I felt honoured to be invited into such an intimate situation, to be present at the creation of a work. The final portraits feel to me like the residue of our conversations, souvenirs of 20 or so encounters at two junctures in our lives.
A prolific artist (http: //www.lynndonoghue.com), there is still new work to look forward to. Rumours also exist of a body of watercolour, male nudes that she was working on which, if true, would bring her back to her origins, when she painted lumpen, youthful abstract painters in their full-bodied glory.
In the art community, we're mourning a much-loved friend and colleague. I don't anticipate meeting her ghost at Dundas and Roncesvalles, our common Toronto neighbourhood; on the contrary, it's her absence that's palpable -- her voice especially. It will be felt by her Friends in various communities, at the Gato Nero on College Street where she had morning coffee for 20 years, at a particular pub on Bloor Street, at the high-Anglican church where she prayed.
Absence has always been one of the clearest motifs in Lynn DONOGHUE's work. When abstraction and representation meet, colours, forms and lines that converge provisionally as a face remember a person not present.
A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday at the Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, 477 Manning Ave., Toronto.

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OLIVIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
Father figure to the Canadian stage
British-trained Stratford character actor never craved starring roles
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, October 16, 2003 - Page R11
For Mervyn " Butch" BLAKE, entering a theatre was a magical experience, something he never tired of during an acting career that spanned close to three-quarters of a century. Mr. BLAKE, one of the most loved members of the Stratford Festival Company, died on October 9 at a Toronto nursing home after a long illness. He was 95.
"Theatre seems to give me life," Mr. BLAKE said in 1994. "I just feel marvellous when I enter the theatre... it's one of the things which keeps me going."
Over his long stage life that included 42 consecutive seasons with the Stratford Festival of Canada, Mr. BLAKE "had the distinction of playing in every single play of Shakespeare's," said Richard MONETTE, Stratford's artistic director.
"He had a great life in the theatre," Mr. MONETTE said.
Adored by both audiences and fellow actors, the veteran actor was known across Canada for his enormous talent and generosity of spirit. When he wasn't working at Stratford, he acted on the country's major stages and in television and film.
For seven seasons, he toured with the Canadian Players, bringing professional theatre to smaller towns. And in 1987, he won a Dora Mavor Moore Award for best performance in a featured role in a production of Saturday, Sunday, Monday at what was then called CentreStage (now CanStage).
"Everyone loved Butch without exception," said John NEVILLE, a former Stratford's artistic director.
Mervyn BLAKE was born on November 30, 1907, in Dehra Dun, India, where his father was a railway executive.
His father wanted him to become an engineer but after falling in love with the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was able to persuade his father to allow him to study at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. In 1932, he graduated and soon made his professional stage debut at the Embassy Theatre in London
During the Second World War, he served in the British Army as a driver. It was during the war years that he is said to have got his nickname Butch. A witness to the horrors of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Mr. BLAKE was present at the liberation of the camp by British troops. It was an experience that haunted him for the rest of his life.
At the war's end, he returned to England and to the stage. He married actress Christine BENNETT and spent the years between 1952 and 1955 at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. There he worked with many of the great British actors such as Sir Laurence OLIVIER, Sir Michael REDGRAVE and Dame Peggy ASHCROFT.
Despite his success on the British stage, he decided to join the Stratford Festival of Canada, then in its fifth season. With his family in tow, Mr. BLAKE moved to Canada and in 1957 appeared in a production of Hamlet with Christopher PLUMMER in the title role.
"He wasn't a leading actor," said actor and director Douglas CAMPBELL. "He was a supporting player. As a supporting player you couldn't get better."
Mr. BLAKE always saw himself as a character actor who never cared that much about starring roles, said Audrey ASHLEY, a former Ottawa Citizen theatre critic and author of Mr. BLAKE's 1999 biography With Love from Butch.
"He was one of those actors you never had to worry about," Ms. ASHLEY said. "You knew Butch was always going to do a good job."
Known for his unfailing good nature and even temper, he enjoyed re-telling gaffes he had made on stage. Mr. MONETTE remembers one performance where Mr. BLAKE appeared on stage as the Sea Captain in Twelfth Night. The character Viola asks him, "What country, Friends, is this?" And instead of responding "This is Illyria, lady." Out of his mouth popped, "This is Orillia."
To the younger actors at Stratford, Mr. BLAKE was a father figure. "He was very fond of the young actors and would take them under his wing," Ms. ASHLEY said.
Stephen RUSSELL remembers arriving at Stratford for his first season in the mid-1970s. He was placed in the same dressing room as Mr. BLAKE, an experience he still holds close to his heart.
"He was one of the most generous human beings," Mr. RUSSELL said.
One of the areas Mr. BLAKE was most helpful in was teaching fellow actors how to apply stage makeup. He loved makeup and on his dressing-room table he had an old rabbit's foot that he would use to apply his face powder, Mr. RUSSELL said.
Aging didn't stop him from applying his own elaborate makeup. Playing the role of old Adam in As You Like It required him to go through the same makeup ritual when he was 70 years old as it did when he performed the role years earlier as a much younger man.
Aside from the stage, one of Mr. BLAKE's passions was cricket. During his first season in Stratford, he played on the festival's team and was responsible for starting a friendly, annual cricket match against the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
Each season, members of the two acting companies would come together for a civilized afternoon of cricket and tea. The Stratford team still goes by the name of Blake's Blokes.
In honour of his talent and dedication to the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in May, 1995.
"When he entered, the stage just lit up," Mr. RUSSELL said.
Mr. BLAKE leaves his wife Christine BENNETT; children Andrew and Bridget; and stepson Tim DAVISSON.
Details of a memorial service to be held in Stratford, Ontario, have yet to be announced.

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OLIVIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Fight master set standards for stage combat
Canadian Press, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Stratford, Ontario -- Patrick (Paddy) CREAN, a longtime fight director at the Stratford Festival who set international standards on staging combat in theatre, died Monday after an illness. He was 93.
Mr. CREAN, who was a competitive fencer, began choreographing fights in 1932 when he was working in his native England as an actor in The Legends of Don Juan. From then on he was frequently hired to stage fight scenes in theatre and movies such as The Master of Ballantree and The Sword of Sherwood Forest. He worked with actors including Paul SCOFIELD, Laurence OLIVIER, Trevor HOWARD, Alec GUINNESS, Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. and Errol FLYNN, often acting as FLYNN's stunt double in movies.
Mr. CREAN first came to the Stratford Festival in 1962 to be fight arranger for a staging of Macbeth and ended up by making Stratford his home. He remained as festival fight director until 1983, arranging combat scenes for such demanding productions as The Three Musketeers. He continued to work as an actor, sometimes taking small roles in shows for which he had done fight arranging and also performing a one-man show, The Sun Never Sets. A funeral will be held Saturday in Stratford.

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