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"SWA" 2003 Obituary


SWAIN  SWALLOW  SWALM  SWARTZ 

SWAIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-09 published
A local hero, first and last
Canadian Press Friday, May 9, 2003 - Page R11
Niagara Falls, Ontario -- Steve ATKINSON, a right winger for the Buffalo Sabres in the 1970s who began his career as a Niagara Falls Flyer, died Tuesday of a heart attack. He was 54.
Born in Toronto in 1948, Mr. ATKINSON made his National Hockey League debut during the 1968-69 season, playing one game for the Boston Bruins. In 1970, Mr. ATKINSON joined the expansion Sabres and played four seasons with them. He also skated for the Washington Capitals.
However, it was his years with the Flyers that provided lasting satisfaction, scoring 77 goals in four years. However, the one goal that local fans remember most was scored April 26, 1968, at Memorial Arena. That's the night Mr. ATKINSON fired home the winning goal in Game 8 of the Ontario Hockey Association championship series to eliminate the Kitchener Rangers.
"It was probably the greatest game in hockey for me, Mr. ATKINSON said in an October profile looking back at the 1967-68 season. "We were all over them."
The Flyers went on to defeat Verdun in the Eastern Canada final and then beat Estevan to capture the Memorial Cup. Mr. ATKINSON scored 19 goals in the Flyers' 29 playoff games that spring, including five goals and 12 points against Estevan.
"He was a super guy and a mainstay on that Memorial Cup team. He was a great player, Flyers teammate Garry SWAIN said.
After the Cup win, Mr. ATKINSON joined the Oklahoma City Blazers of the Central Hockey League. In his one season with the Blazers, he scored 40 goals and 80 points in 65 games en route to being named the league's rookie of the year.
He made his National Hockey League debut during the 1968-69 season, playing one game for the Boston Bruins.
In 1970, Mr. ATKINSON joined the expansion Buffalo Sabres and went on to play four seasons with them. He also suited up for the National Hockey League's Washington Capitals, North American Hockey League's Erie Blades and the Toronto Toros of the World Hockey Association. In 1977, he helped the Brantford Alexanders win the Allan Cup.
Mr. ATKINSON leaves his wife, Karen and children Kimberly and Kristin, and adult children James and Lisa.
The funeral is today at St. Andrew's United Church in Niagara Falls at 11 a.m.

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SWALLOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
Jonathan SWALLOW
By Chris MALETTE Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A24
Teacher, educational software consultant, ski and soccer coach, and dad. Born in Glenn Ridge, N.J., on April 20, 1958. Died April 27 in Stirling, Ontario, of sudden heart failure, aged 45.
Kids who love a cold day on a fast ski hill, somewhat sedentary soccer moms and dads who liked to break an occasional sweat and, strangely, frogs everywhere will miss Jonathan SWALLOW. Jonathan was 45 when, in the prime of an athletic and active life, his heart -- harbouring a hidden, undiagnosed ailment that affected the rhythm of the organ -- betrayed an otherwise vibrant man in his prime.
Born in suburban New Jersey and educated at Syracuse University, Jonathan came to Canada in the 1980s to undertake graduate studies at McMaster University where he met the woman who would become his wife, Mary Ellen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. He went on to achieve his PhD at the University of Toronto.
In his professional career, Jonathan was lauded by scholars for his cutting-edge work in interactive learning software. At Waterloo, he collaborated with professor Norm SCOTT and the Centre for Learning and Teaching Through Technology -- or LT3 -- to create a program that allows biology students to dissect frogs in a virtual environment, on computer, without harming a single amphibian.
After moving to Stirling, north of Belleville, Ontario, and beginning a family there, Jonathan made fast and strong Friends in the local amateur theatre community. He helped get couch-potato parents off the sofa for an adult soccer league and coached in the Stirling and District Minor Soccer League. But Jonathan truly came to the fore on the ski slopes of Ontario.
Batawa Ski Club holds many memories of Jonathan. During the winter he was either on the road, at a ski race, over by the fireplace talking earnestly with a parent, sitting at a table with his family and Friends or on the hill having a great time with his racers.
At a moving and funny, yet surreal, memorial service for Jonathan at the tatty but active ski club in May, one of Jonathan's closest Friends and fellow Batawa racing coach, Jeff DURISH, remembered Jonathan's dual sense of duty and of fun: "The Rookie program, for children not old enough to travel with a league team, had fallen on hard times and nobody had run it for a number of years. Jonathan phoned me and talked me into helping him revive the program. Helping Jonathan was one of the best decisions that I have ever made. I always meant to thank him for it, now I wish I had."
Jonathan would always show up to practice with a backpack full of beanbags, ropes and bungee cords, his arms full of bamboo poles and his head full of crazy ideas. All the other coaches would scratch their heads and marvel at the weird and wonderful drills he came up with -- four kids hanging onto a bamboo pole doing 360s down the hill, racers hanging onto long ropes as they carved big turns around beanbags. Those crazy beanbags were always strewn across the hill.
Of course there were always the weird songs and dances to go along with the drills. It was effective, it was amazing, it was silly, it was fun, it was wonderful and full of joy -- it was Jonathan.
"Jonathan was an exceptional coach because he was a great teacher, an inventor and a child at heart," said brother-in-law Rob TERRY.
Jonathan leaves wife Mary Ellen, daughter Jenny Lee and son Joseph, as well as scores of grateful soccer kids, skiers and leopard frogs everywhere who croak their thanks for a life well lived.
Chris MALETTE is a ski dad who shared a mug or two of hot chocolate with Jonathan SWALLOW.

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SWALM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
Fredeen was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the Fredeen Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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SWALM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-15 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
FREDEEN was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the FREDEEN Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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SWARTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
BULL, Stewart Hastings (1916-2003) Teacher, soldier, author, historian, churchman, and loving family man. Born in Windsor, Ontario, died peacefully at home in Toronto on November 17, leaving Doris, his loving wife of 55 years, dear daughters Catherine (Richard GOLD) and Muriel (Kenneth OLSEN) and his adored grandchildren, Laura, Susanna and James. Predeceased by brothers, Henry BULL, Q.C. and the Reverend Edgar BULL, and sister Jane DOBROTA, R.N. A World War 2 veteran who served with the Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment, he was severely wounded in Normandy in 1944. He will be remembered first and foremost as a lively and inspiring teacher of History and English at Walkerville Collegiate, the University of Toronto Schools, and the Faculty of Education, U. of T. He encouraged generations of students, and dedicated boundless energy to school spirit, cadets, debating and dramatics. He was regimental historian, museum curator and Council member with the Queen's York Rangers of Toronto. A committed Anglican, he was active in parish work and community outreach at Saint Thomas's and All Saints' Kingsway Churches. Stewart was a steady leader who shared his love of people, creative spirit, and enthusiasm for life with all he knew. Sincere thanks to Dr. SWARTZ, Dr. PREOBRAZENSKI, Olive, Audrey, Karen, and to Colonel Michael STEVENSON, for their care and support. Visitation at Turner and Porter Funeral Home, Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. on Friday November 21 from 7 - 9 p.m. Funeral service Saturday November 22 at 1: 30 p.m. All Saints' Kingsway Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. at Prince Edward Rd. Memorial donations to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Médecins sans Frontières or All Saints' Kingsway Church.

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