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"McFA" 2003 Obituary


MCFADDEN  MCFAIL  MCFALL  MCFARLAND  MCFARLANE  MCFAUL 

McFADDEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
McCUTCHEON
-In memory of a dear mother, Ida Zella, who passed away August 26, 2001.
A little tribute small and tender
Just to say we still remember.
-Marilyn and Ross MacFADDEN

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McFADDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-05 published
Clifton WARD
By Sheryl SPENCER Monday, May 5, 2003 - Page A18
Veteran, printer, father, stepfather, grandfather. Born March 19, 1913, in Surrey, England. Died December 3, 2002 in Barrie, Ontario of natural causes, aged 89.
My Grandpa's early years were marked by the First World War. His earliest memory was of being very afraid while travelling with his mother by train to London; German zeppelins were trying to bomb the train. My grandpa's father, Reuben WARD, served in that war.
After that war, Reuben WARD took a position "in service" as a chauffeur. Grandpa witnessed his father at the estate owner's beck-and-call day and night, and at some point he realized that should his father ever leave his job, their family would be out of house and home. As a result, that my grandfather became a lifelong socialist.
At the age of 14, my grandfather was apprenticed to the estate manager. It was he who got Grandpa a job as a typist at the West Surrey Farmers' Association in Guildford. Grandpa left the West Surrey Farmers' Association as assistant manager in 1951.
As a young adult my Grandpa read everything he could get his hands on; he played badminton and tennis; he bought himself a motorcycle and became a trials rider; and he acquired an Austin Ulster Healey sports car. Most importantly, my Grandpa learned to dance. He said that there were not many things that he could do really, really well, but dancing was one of them.
It was through playing badminton that Grandpa met Marion WALTHER. She was from a higher "class, " but they danced well together. It was expected that they would marry, so they did.
When the Second World War broke out, my grandpa enlisted with the Royal Air Force. He spent most of the war in North Africa and felt that his greatest contribution was having taken part in the Battle of El Alamein. During the war, Grandpa was often under fire; his only injury, however, was a bone broken at the top of his little finger. He felt that he was not spared death for any special purpose; he was just lucky.
After the war, Grandpa and Marion settled into domestic life. They bought a house and adopted two children, Leila and Paul. In 1951, however, they decided to emigrate to Canada. Grandpa found work in Barrie, Ontario, first at the Simcoe District Co-operative and then in the commercial printing department of the Barrie Examiner.
Grandpa and Marion divorced in 1962 and Grandpa moved to Toronto and began a job with Web Offset, another printing company. He took an apartment and met a woman who lived in the same building: my grandmother, Sylvia McFADDEN.
When my grandpa married my grandmother in 1965 he took on a huge, ready-made family: my grandmother's seven children and what would become (by my estimate) 27 grandchildren, 39 great-grandchildren and eight great-great grandchildren.
Grandpa said that he found in my grandmother an anchor -- and that commitment extended to all of us. My grandparents' home was the central clearing depot of all family information. They sent thousands of cards over the years, lent money, and offered a spare room and a warm welcome to anyone who needed it. It was remarkable enough when my grandmother was alive that no birthday was ever forgotten; it was even more remarkable after her death in 1992 that the cards kept coming.
My grandpa never intended to live to be 89. He missed my grandmother, his sister, Doff, and his brother, Leslie, who all predeceased him. He thought he was dying for many years before his courtship with death was finally consummated. The love and support he and my grandmother gave, these lie now within us, our gift to bestow on the generations to come.
Sheryl is Clifton's granddaughter.

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McPHAIL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
Died This Day -- Norman (Red) RYAN, 1936
Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Career criminal born in Toronto in July, 1895; in First World War, joined Canadian Army; deserted to commit numerous robberies in Ontario, Quebec and the United States; captured and made spectacular escape from Kingston Penitentiary; in 1923, recaptured in United States and deported; sentenced to life imprisonment in Kingston became model prisoner, the "darling" of prison reformer Agnes McPHAIL and premier R.B. BENNETT; in July, 1935, won parole for 10 months, toured as spokesman for prison reform while secretly re-establishing underworld contacts; killed in shootout with police while robbing Sarnia, Ontario, liquor store of $394.

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McPHAIL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
Marion CHAMBERS
By Rosemary, Colin and Maralee CHAMBERS, Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, grandmother, wife and partner, teacher, friend, community activist. Born July 23, 1928, in Massey, Ontario Died June 22 in Guelph, Ontario, aged 74.
It seemed fitting that Marion CHAMBERS won the 1994 Ontario New Democratic Party's Agnes MacPhail award for pioneering women. Like MacPHAIL, Marion's roots were in Ontario's Grey County. And like MacPHAIL, she lived life with a strong commitment to social justice, equality and activism.
Born in Massey, Ontario, in 1928, Marion McKESSOCK grew up on a farm in the Depression era. As a child she was a strong student with a flair for reading, creative writing and drama. Marion aspired to be a journalist but as there were few women in the profession at that time, her guidance counsellor (later known to Canadians as Olive DIEFENBAKER) steered her toward teaching. It was a good match. As a teacher, parent and friend, Marion had never-ending patience, an enthusiasm for knowledge, a keen analytical mind and an ability to bring out the best in people.
Marion taught in Inglewood, Guelph and Forest Hill while completing her B.A. at Queen's University during the summers. Her first love as a teacher was English literature and drama and she won awards for her student productions. Even after her formal teaching career ended, Marion continued to pursue English and drama on a volunteer basis. She taught English as a second language to two Vietnamese families who settled in the Erin area and wrote and directed an annual Christmas pageant for the children of Friends and neighbours.
Marion met Cecil, her husband of 46 years, when she taught his younger sister.
Along with their children, Rosemary, Colin and Maralee, they settled in Erin Township. Their busy lives were balanced by gorgeous fall colour, serene winter walks, spring carpets of trilliums and summers of gardening.
While at home caring for her young family, Marion became very involved in her community. She served on the boards of her local arts council, library, home and school association, parks and recreation association, United Church and on the Wellington Dufferin Health Council. Marion was elected to Erin Village Council in 1975 and her many contributions to the community were officially recognized when she was awarded Erin's Citizen of the Year Award.
A long-time member and supporter of the New Democratic Party, Marion became increasingly involved in the party in the late 1970s and early 1980s. She managed campaigns, twice sought election to the Ontario Legislature, served on the Ontario New Democratic Party Executive and was party president from 1982-1984.
Marion loved ideas and debate and was well known for putting her beliefs into action. She was often ahead of her time: recycling long before it was common, offering her own home as a "safe house" before such alternatives were available locally, expressing written dissent in 1988 when her United Church Board voted to deny the ordination of gays and lesbians. She encouraged her children in their studies and careers and enjoyed the lively discussions that ensued when five opinionated family members and frequent guests met around the dinner table.
Marion greeted everyone she met with a warm and engaging smile. Family and Friends looked to her for support.
Marion would have been humbled by the dedicated group of caregivers who were by her side as Alzheimer's disease took its toll. Her husband Cecil, her children and grandchildren, extended family and Friends provided exemplary care and support. As one friend noted in a letter to the family, "great love begets great love."
Rosemary, Colin and Maralee are Marion's children.

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McFALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-10 published
Mary Boyle HUDSON
By Mary Jean McFALL Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - Page A24
Wife, mother, grandmother, community leader, cattlewoman, Scotch aficionado. Born January 10, 1931, in Hamilton, Ontario; died June 29 in Lyn, Ontario, of pancreatic cancer, aged 72.
For all that Mary HUDSON cultivated her Scottish roots and was a keen royalist, she loved her country well. Never one for southern beach holidays, she preferred a visit to the polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba
Mary's father, Edward MORWICK, was a Westinghouse engineer in Hamilton, Ontario; her mother, Anne HAMILTON, was a Scottish émigrée. The family brought mementoes from Scotland -- a tartan rug, a travelling trunk -- which had been handed down over the generations; Mary considered herself not the owner but the custodian of these pieces, which she has since entrusted to her children.
After Hamilton's Westdale Collegiate, Mary studied home economics at Macdonald Institute at the University of Guelph. In 1956, responding to a Globe and Mail ad for a high school home economics teacher in Brockville, Ontario, Mary set off in her Nash Metropolitan hardtop. Joe HUDSON, a local farmer and eligible bachelor took note; his nieces always said Mary seemed like a movie star. The city girl married the country boy in 1958, and traded her hardtop for a station wagon. Then she and Joe began a life that would allow Mary to make her home in the tiny village of Lyn, and to see her country and the world.
Mary and Joe raised five children, with the best fundamentals she could offer: She taught them to remember where they came from and she encouraged them to be citizens of the world. She helped found and maintain a local library; established a swimming program; and worked with her United Church, the Fulford Home for Women and the Brockville Hospital, where she not only sat on the board of governors, she also took the wagon around to bring chocolate bars and newspapers to patients.
Mary's passions included a penchant for early morning royal weddings on the television. A founding member of the Brockville An Quaiche society, a club that appreciates the merits of good single malt scotch, she had a taste for a "wee dram."
Together, Mary and Joe built Joe's business, Burnbrae Farms, into a dynamic agricultural enterprise. In 1978, her Christmas gift from Joe started her on her herd of Aberdeen Angus cattle. In 1995, several of her cows won championship ribbons at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto.
Mary was a mother to many; privately, she lived a public life. Her door was open without the need to knock. Known as the best cook on the Lyn Road, she made jams in a copper kettle brought from Scotland. I remember Mom supervising church turkey dinners, using a three-foot masher to deal with all the potatoes.
She also produced baby quilts; the last was for Evelyn Mary Morwick ROGAN, her granddaughter who was born 16 days after Mom died.
The crowd at her funeral was so large that we had to enlist the Ontario Provincial Police to handle the traffic. After the service, we walked from the church to the cemetery, with Mary's Clydesdale horses leading the way. When Rob MILLER, the self-declared piper for the clan, reached the top of the hill by the cemetery, he stopped for a moment to talk with the Ontario Provincial Police officer, and they looked down at the hundreds of people walking in the procession. "With all this activity you'd think the Queen had died," said the officer. Rob responded, "She has."
Mary is survived by her husband, Joe, her sister, Helen MORWICK, her children, Helen Anne, Mary Jean, Ted, Susan and Margaret, their spouses, and nine grandchildren. She loved them all.
Mary Jean is Mary HUDSON's daughter.

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McFARLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
KEARNS, Thomas Joseph
Tom died peacefully at North York General Hospital on February 9, 2003, following a brief illness, in his 96th year. Beloved husband of Edith KEARNS, and the late Anne KEARNS (1979.) Tom will be greatly missed by his son Dr. Terrence KEARNS (Linda) and his daughter Colleen DODDS, and Edith's children Bob McFARLAND (Pat,) and Jayne CHALLONER (Jim.) He leaves behind six grandchildren Glen KEARNS (Shelly), Chris KEARNS (Nancy), Tim KEARNS (Kim), Darlene KINGSTONE (Brian), Denise DODDS (Wayne), Catherine DODDS (Lee), and seven great-grandchildren. The family extends thanks to Dr. RUMBLE, Dr. SOMMERFIELD, and the excellent nursing staff at North York General Hospital. Friends may call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence), on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Blessed Sacrament Church (Yonge Street south of Lawrence), on Thursday morning February 13, 2003 at 10 o'clock. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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McFARLANE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE
In loving memory Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE, September 30, 1941 to December 15, 2003.
Mandy BELLEROSE, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, December 15, 2003 at the age of 62 years.
She was born in Carnarvon Township, daughter of the late Albert and Anne (McFARLANE) DAVIS. Mandy had worked with the developmentally handicapped for over 15 years. She enjoyed bingo, going to the casinos, crosswords and knitting. Her greatest love and the most pleasure she had in her life was her family. Although she will be sadly missed, many fond memories will be cherished by her entire family and Friends.
Dearly loved wife of Donald BELLEROSE, loving and loved mother of Kelly SMITH and his wife Marie of Hensall, Debbie WHITE/WHYTE and her husband David of Brampton and Ray SMITH of Providence Bay and step-children Dawn of Sault Ste. Marie, Michael and his wife Terry of Sudbury and Darrin and partner Shawna of Sault Ste Marie. Proud grandmother of Kasaundra, Tiffany, Kristi, Melissa and Bryan. Dear sister of John DAVIS, and his wife Cindy of Spring Bay. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews, and many cousins and Friends. Predeceased by infant daughter Mary Ann HEBERT and brother Joseph Morlyn DAVIS.
Friends may call at the Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya after 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Thursday, December 18, at 3: 00 p.m. with Father Robert Foliot officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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McFARLANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
CAIN, Thomas Henry
At St. Joseph's Villa, Dundas, 18 February 2003, of cancer. Professor of English literature at McMaster University for 31 years, Tom had a keen interest in teaching undergraduates to write lucid prose, and was author of Common Sense About Writing (1967). The methods in this manual were conceived and developed while an instructor at Yale University, and arise from the rigors of the old Ontario school curriculum of which he was a beneficiary. Author of Praise in The Fairie Queene (1978), and numerous related articles, he began his scholarly interest in Edmund Spenser while an undergraduate at Victoria College, University of Toronto his graduate degrees were from the Universities of Toronto and Wisconsin. He was a regular church organist from his boyhood, until in 1967 he joined the choir of St. James' Anglican Church in Dundas under the direction of Richard BIRNEY- SMITH, in whose Te Deum Singers he also sang from 1972 until his health began to fail in 1997. In 1976 he joined Saint John's Anglican Church in Ancaster, where he sang in the choir for 22 years, and enjoyed a central role in designing its organ in 1988. His hymn text, 'Eternal Lord of Love, Behold Your Church, ' written for the Episcopal Church's Hymnal (1982), is included in Roman Catholic and Lutheran hymnals, and the 1998 hymnal in present use in the Anglican Church of Canada. A gardener of great knowledge and experience, he shared this interest information and particularly plants generously. Throughout his life, he enjoyed deep Friendships with animals. He found a great store of patience and humour to confront the illness which ended his life. He is survived by his widow, Emily CAIN, of Jerseyville; his son, Patrick CAIN, of Toronto, and his sister, Catherine MacFARLANE, of Maple, who wish to thank McMaster University Medical Centre and St. Joseph's Villa staff for their care and compassion. Requiem Eucharist at Saint John's Anglican Church, 272 Wilson St. (at Halson St.), in Ancaster, on Saturday, March 1 at 10: 30 a.m. (casual clothes) reception to follow in Saint John's parish hall (on Halson St.). Spring bulb flowers will be gratefully accepted at the church or parish hall. Please send donations in lieu of flowers to St. John's Church (music programme), 272 Wilson Street, Ancaster, Ontario L9G 2B9.

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McFARLANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JAMIESON, Joseph Thoburn
Died suddenly, February 25, 2003, in hospital, at Cranbrook, British Columbia. Beloved and loving husband of Ellen Cameron (McFARLANE,) his wife of 45 years. Sadly missed by his two sons, Joseph Alexander (Alec); and Michael Douglas (Laura SALEM), cherished ''Papa'' of Kathleen all of Calgary. Lovingly remembered by his sister Norah (wife of the late Don CARR,) Manotick, Ontario brother, William R. (Pamela MacDOWELL,) Rideau Ferry, Ontario. Predeceased by his sister Catherine E. DAVIDSON, Aberdeen, Scotland. ''Uncle Joe'' will be forever loved and never forgotten by his nieces and nephews Susan WINTER (Bill;) Mary McLAUGHLIN (Peter) and Shannon; Scott (Joanne), Jacqueline and William; Jane Jamieson and other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by very special grandniece Lindsey WINTER. Born at Almonte, Ontario, January 24, 1927, son of the late William Algernon and Catherine Isobel (COCHRAN) JAMIESON. Primary and secondary education at Almonte. Graduated, as a Textile Engineer, from Philadelphia Institute of Technology, 1949. Moved west to British Columbia upon his retirement, in 1991. Following a productive 26 year career, with Canadian General Tower Ltd. of Cambridge Ontario, Joe and Ellen spent many happy years at Nelson, Marysville and Cranbrook, British Columbia. Traveling with Ellen he enjoyed frequent trips back to visit their special Friends in Ontario. Joe seemed to particularly look forward to his fall hunting excursions to visit the Happy Hopeful Hunt Club on Pakenham Mountain. Family members and close Friends have been recipient of the product of his sculpted wood bird carving endeavors of his retirement years. Joe will live forever within the hearts of those of us who loved him. Missed by many.

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McFARLANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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McFARLANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
O'CONNOR, Audrey Albina (née McAULEY)
Died peacefully at sunrise on May 23, 2003, having just turned 83. Survived by her loving daughter Susan O'CONNOR, son-in-law Ken WAXMAN, and her sister Gretchen MacFARLANE (Murray) of Saint John, New Brunswick Fondly remembered by her dear friend Marguerite GULDE (Hans,) and her late brother Vincent's children. Predeceased by her husband Leo O'CONNOR. Born in Centreville, New Brunswick, Audrey lived for many years in Ottawa until moving to Toronto in 1964. An enthusiastic traveller and creative, independent spirit, Audrey was the first of her contemporaries to return to the workforce in the early 1960s. Originally a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse, Audrey worked for many years in royalties administration for two major record companies. After ''retirement'' she held several jobs, but particularly enjoyed one with a small property management company. Cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to celebrate Audrey's life with Ken and Susan at home on Tuesday, May 27 after 5 p.m. Special thanks to the thoughtful and accommodating staff of Toronto East General Hospital (B-5) for their care and compassion.

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McFARLANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
McFARLANE, Geoffrey Bruce (1951 -- 2003)
Died suddenly, on September 5th, 2003, after a short, fierce struggle with cancer, borne with bravery and dignity. He was the much loved eldest son of Isabel and the late Dr. Douglas McFARLANE. Geoffrey will be remembered always by his siblings Paul (Sue), Kim NIKALSON, Perci, Breck, Dr. Rene and Connie his nieces and nephews Daley, Kelda, Colin, Kaarina, Fraser, Amica, Sophie and Emmett; his aunt Mrs. Norma REISS (Claude) and uncle Dr. Bruce McFARLANE (Connie,) and, of course, his Friends. Special thanks to the medical team at St. Michael's Hospital for their knowledge and sensitivity. Funeral service will be at St. Leonard's Anglican Church (Wanless and Yonge), on Friday, September 12 at 3 p.m. The family will be at home for Friends after the service at 71 Buckingham Avenue. No flowers please, but if desired, donations would be appreciated to the Toronto Humane Society.
Rest in peace, Geoffrey

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McFAUL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
William James " Alvin" GLASBY
In loving memory of William James "Alvin" GLASBY who passed away peacefully at Mindemoya Hospital on Friday, April 25, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Predeceased by his beloved wife Elaine (née SLOAN.) Loved by his children Dorothy of Little Current, Edward and his wife Diane of Tehkummah, Lorraine and her husband Roger Pyette of Manitowaning and Janet (predeceased.) Dear grandfather of Tracy and Vickie PYETTE, Dianne and her husband Neil DEBASSIGE and Carolyn GLASBY. Fondly remembered by sisters and brothers Norma JOHNS (husband Harold predeceased) of Sault Ste. Marie, Marion ELLIOT/ELLIOTT (husband Howard predeceased) of Mindemoya, Lyle (wife Rosie predeceased) of Spring Bay, Eldin of Providence Bay, Harold and his wife Shirley of Sudbury. Will be missed by in-laws: Helen HANN of Mulberry, Indiana Echo and Ray McFAUL of Havelock, Phyllis and Jim MUNRO of Kagawong, Stan and Ada SLOAN of North Bay, John and Evelyn SLOAN of Kincardine, Murray and Sheila SLOAN of Rossland, BC and Jacinthe SLOAN of Montreal. Uncle of many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held at Mindemoya United Church from 7-9 pm on Sunday, April 27, 2003. Funeral Service was held on Monday, April 28, 2003 at Mindemoya United Church. Burial in Mindemoya Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home, Little Current.

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