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"McGR" 2003 Obituary


MCGRAGH  MCGRATH  MCGRAW  MCGREGOR 

McGRAGH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
McGRAGH
-In loving memory of our dearly loved and cherished son, brother and uncle, Gordon Thomas, who was taken from us March 6, 1983.
This month comes back with deep regret
It brings back a day we will never forget.
He went away without saying good-bye
But our memories of him will never die.
No one knows the grief we bear
When the family meets and he's not there.
The tears we shed will wipe away
But the ache in our hearts will always stay.
He left us so suddenly, his thoughts unknown
But he left us with memories,
We are proud to own.
-Sadly missed, always loved and remembered by Mom and family.

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McGRAGH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
McGRAGH
-In loving memory of William Malcolm, June 4, 1929 to May 5, 1998.
When I Must Leave You
When I must leave you for a little while
Please do not grieve and shed wild tears.
And hug your sorrow to you through the years
But start out bravely with a gallant smile
And for my sake and in my name
Live on and do all things the same,
Feed not you loneliness on empty days
But fill each waking hour in useful ways.
Reach out your hand and comfort and cheer.
And I in turn will comfort you and hold you near
And never, never be afraid to die,
For I am waiting for you in the sky!
-Doris and family

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McGRATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-26 published
Sheilagh Ann McGRATH
By Sean McGRATH Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - Page A20
Twin, student of education, artist. Born December 12, 1966, in Saint John's, Newfoundland Died December 14, 2002, in Ottawa, of a brain tumour, aged 36.
Sheilagh McGRATH was best known for her kindness, yet she possessed a hidden heroism, which surfaced in her astonishing courage and good cheer in the face of progressively debilitating, fatal illness. She was the quiet one in a family of six talented, attention-demanding children -- my twin sister.
At the age of 16, Sheilagh was diagnosed at the Montreal Neurological Institute with an inoperable brain tumour. She had been suffering from severe headaches for some time. She was plucked from the torrent of adolescence and subjected to radiation therapy. She lost her hair -- a profound trauma for her -- and missed the better part of the school year.
Sheilagh's soft-spoken demeanor concealed a fiercely strong will. She was determined to conquer her disease. She returned to high-school and enjoyed four relatively healthy years, graduating and going on to study Early Childhood Education.
In 1986 our father, James McGRATH, was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Newfoundland. Sheilagh returned to Saint John's and continued her studies at Memorial University. A relapse of tumour-related problems led to a coma and near-death. She recovered, but her weakened short-term memory forced her to drop out of university. She clung to the dream of going back. The term would invariably begin without her, but undaunted, she would plan the next.
Her strength of will manifested itself in less subtle ways. In 1987, the Earl of Wessex, then a young Prince Edward of the House of Windsor, was our guest at Government House in Saint John's. When the prince requested a quiet night, the staff was instructed not to disturb him. My parents went out. In her early 20s, with eligible royalty in the house, Sheilagh had other ideas. She put on her best dress and joined the prince and his entourage in one of the State Rooms.
In 1989, her disease progressed rapidly, leaving her wheelchair-bound. She took a keen interest in painting. The Newfoundland artist Gerald SQUIRES gave her private lessons. The watercolours she did under his tutelage are full of light and joy. They not only express her spirit, but also reflect the special bond that developed between her and SQUIRES.
Sheilagh endured multiple surgeries at the Montreal Neuro with a disarming smile. In 1992 she was moved to the Elizabeth Bruyère Heath Center in Ottawa. Out from under her parents' roof for the first time, she thrived. She entertained visitors with Scrabble, chess, or a stroll through the Byward Market. A one-person cottage industry in the arts and crafts room, she created her Christmas presents by hand. She became a member of the Residents' Council and a persistent advocate of the rights of patients. The elderly Alzheimer's patients troubled her at first. She came to understand that she was called to minister to them, to befriend them, listen to them, or simply reach out and touch them.
In her last year, Sheilagh lost her power of movement, her speech, and most of her vision. In his homily at her funeral in the basilica in Ottawa, Father Norm BONNEAU expressed the paradox of her extraordinary transformation through suffering: "The more restricted in body, the freer her spirit; the greater the setback, the greater her courage; the greater the affliction, the gentler her kindness." As her physical existence declined, her serenity increased. By the end of her life she was an entirely other-centered person. Her death, in the presence of her family, was a definitive "Yes" to life. With gentleness, grace, and silent resolve, Sheilagh McGRATH let the world go.
Sean McGRATH is Sheilagh's twin brother.

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McGRATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
MAURICE, Beverley Ann (McGRATH)
Peacefully at her home at 20 Tallwood Road, surrounded by loving family and Friends, on March 7, 2003, Beverley Ann MAURICE (McGRATH) of London, in her 66th year. Beloved wife of Peter Charles MAURICE. Loving and caring mother of Jonathan and Sandy, of London. Loving grandmother of Meredith, Vanessa and Zachary MAURICE of London. Dear sister of the late Margaret of Michigan and Constance of California. Adored by her large extended family Julie, John, Heather, Erica, Mark, Elizabeth, Allan, Suzanne, Derek, Darin, Jacob, Bradley, Stella, Cameron, Jason, Brian, Thomas, Sue, Ida, Andy, James, Sylvia, David, James, Sally. Friends may call on Sunday from 2-4 p.m. and on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, Richmond Street at St. James. The funeral service will be conducted in the Church of Saint John the Evangelist, 280 St. James Street at Wellington on Tuesday, March 11 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the London Humane Society or charity of your choice.

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McGRATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MATHER, Naomi
Peacefully, at her home in Waterloo, surrounded by the love of her family, Naomi died early Monday morning, July 21, 2003. She was 20. Naomi struggled with Ewing's Sarcoma since January of 2002. Her indomitable spirit sustained all who knew her. Precious daughter of Susan (COOKE) and Fred MATHER and dearest sister of John. Naomi will be lovingly remembered by her Paternal grandmother, Ivey MATHER of Perth; her special friend Marjorie MALLORY, Aunts and Uncles, Marilyn CURRY of Headingly, Minnesota, Catherine and Richard FREEMAN of Vancouver, Lorna and Jim PEDEN and Sheila PRESCOTT (Dave McGRATH) of Perth; cousins, Tyler, Jennifer and Andrew CURRY, Harry and Gabby FREEMAN, Corinne, Trent and Colin PEDEN and Patricia PRESCOTT. Naomi's life included a wide circle of Friends, especially Cara DURST. Her Scottish Terrier Ghillie and Tabby cat Tamara had a special place in her heart. She was predeceased by Maternal grandparents, Roy and Edith COOKE and her Paternal grandfather, John MATHER. In Naomi's short life, she involved herself in many activities. She was a graduate of Waterloo Collegiate Institute and was enrolled in Science studies at Queen's University when she became ill. Some of her involvements and interests included Strathyre Highland Dancers, Children's International Summer Villages, working as a lifeguard and swimming instructor and playing the piano. Friend's and relatives are invited to share their memories of Naomi with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 7 to 9 pm this evening (Tuesday) and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm Wednesday. A service to celebrate Naomi's life will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2003, 11 am, at Westminster United Church (The Cedars,) 543 Beechwood Drive, Waterloo, with Reverend John ANDERSON officiating. A committal service will follow in Parkview Cemetery Crematorium Chapel, Waterloo. Following the committal at the Cemetery, Friends and relatives are invited to return to Westminster United Church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.In Naomi's memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Sarcoma Fund at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto or the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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McGRAW o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Rick FRANCIS
Funeral services for Mr. Rick FRANCIS, age 47 years, who died Saturday, May 17, 2003, were held on Tuesday evening in the Blake Funeral Chapel in Thunder Bay, ON, led by Reverend Larry KROKER of Saint Anne's Church. Eulogies were offered by Kevin MAIN, Jaymie PENNY, Paul FRANCIS, Jennifer O'NEIL and Tamara BROWN. Numerous co-workers from the city of Thunder Bay, fellow coaches from minor hockey, neighbors, Friends and family attended the service. Removal was then made to Little Current, for visitation and Funeral Mass in Saint Bernard's Church celebrated by Reverend Bert FOLIOT S.J. on Thursday, May 22, 2003. The readings were proclaimed by Celina McGREGOR, Jennifer KEYS, Raquel KOENIG and PollyAnna McNALLY. Eulogies were offered by Kerry FRANCIS, Raymond FRANCIS, Jenny McGRAW, Paul FRANCIS and Ruthanne FRANCIS. The offertory gifts were presented by Kerry and Brenda FRANCIS. The Soloist was Rosa PITAWANAKWAT- BURK/BURKE accompanied by the organist Thomas NESHIKWE. Services were largely attended by long time Friends, members of Saint Bernard Church, and family. Honourary Pallbearers were Jeff FRANCIS and David LARSON. The Active Pallbearers were Allan ESHKAWKOGAN, Paul FRANCIS Jr., Robert McGRAW Jr., Craig KOENIG, Mike McNALLY and Chris KEYS.

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McGRAW o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE)
In loving memory of Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE) who passed away Thursday morning, October 30, 2003 at her residence at the age of 73 years.
Beloved wife of Raymond George KING, predeceased. Will be sadly missed by her children, Susan KING and Will PATHY, Jane KING and Ken PASTO, Debbie KING and Bill HOMER, Patrick KING (wife Jean) and predeceased by son Kevin KING. Special grandmother of Desmond and Grant KING. Dear sister of Anne BREYER, Jean ANDREWS, Ivan MADAHBEE, Lillian BUCKNELL, Archie MADAHBEE, Cecilia BAYERS, Linda THIBODEAU, Patsy CORBIERE, Tootsie PANAMICK, Patrick MADAHBEE and predeceased by Veronica McGRAW, Lawrence MADAHBEE, Elizabeth KING, Eli MADAHBEE, Morris MADAHBEE and Doris BREWER. Rested at the Sucker Creek Community Hall on Sunday, November 1, 2003. Funeral Mass was held at St. Bernard's Church, Little Current on Monday, November 3, 2003. Cremation. Lougheed Funeral Home Sudbury.

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McGRAW o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
WABINOGESHIG Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI
In Loving Memory of WABINOGESHIG, Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI, Fish, Eagle and Bear Clan, 49 years.
Max began his Spirit Journey Sunday, November 02, 2003 at his favourite place, Perch Lake in Sheguiandah First Nation. Beloved husband and best friend to Shauna (née PITAWANAKWAT) ASSINEWAI. Loving father to Derek, Adrienne, Nicole, Brian and Maggie. Proud grandfather of Cole and Eric. Dear son of Evelyn and Jacob ASSINEWAI (predeceased) and Isabel and John McGRAW of Wikwemikong. Will be sadly missed by special in-laws (Walter GONAWABI of Wikwemikong, Gail JACOBS of Serpent River and Ken BISSON of M'Chigeeng). Dear brother to Steven, Wendy, Raymond, Josephine, Julius (wife Mary), Thomas (predeceased), Jeanette (husband Darcy PAQUET,) Norman (wife Frances) all of Wikwemikong. Son-in-law to Malcom and Connie PITAWANAKWAT of Wikwemikong. Cherished brother-in-law to Rachel (Todd), Mark (Tanya), Lisa (Gord), Wendy, Dawn, Walton, Ralphie (Wendy), Shannon, Raven, Alison and Tim (predeceased). He is also survived by his many nieces and nephews and his families of Birch Island, Rousseau River (Manitoba) and Red Lake (Minnesota).
Max's life path was guided by the culture and traditions of the Anishinabek. He was Ogitch'dah, Eagle Staff Carrier, Pipe Carrier, and respected spiritual healer. He will also be missed by his traditional societies to which he belonged: Windigo, Big Drum, Mide(win), Wiidehgokaan and Giiskaa. His devotion to this people led him to be a political leader and advisor for Sheguiandah First Nation, neighboring First Nations and the Metis Nation.
Max enjoyed hunting, gambling, BINGO, cultural gatherings, pow-wows, children, visiting, hockey and traveling extensively throughout Mother Earth.
Most of all, Max will be remembered for the time he took to share with his sense of humour and for his willingness to always help others at anytime.
Wake Services was held at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Funeral Services will be celebrated on Friday, November 07, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre. Interment at his residence, Feast to follow. Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Gregor McGREGOR
In loving memory of Donald Gregor McGREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Donald Gregor McGREGOR Senior of Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island who passed on to the Spirit World on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 71 years. Known for his gentle spirit and kind sense of humour, he enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing, hunting, bingo and home projects. He worked for E. B. Eddy for 20 years before retiring in 1996. He also served several terms as Band Councillor on the Whitefish River Band Council and was President of St. Gabriel's Parish Council for many years. He was honoured as an Elder and Eagle Staff Carrier of Whitefish River First Nation. He was of the Eagle Clan and his Ojibway name he proudly carried was Ogimas, given to him by his father when he was a young lad. He played many years with the Sheguiandah Bears and was an avid supporter of minor hockey. Much beloved husband of 41 years and best friend of Mary Grace (nee MANITOWABI.) Loving and cherished father of Lucy Ann (husband Donald TRUDEAU) of Blind River, Patty (husband Leon LIGHTNING) of Hobbema, Alberta, Donald (wife Sandrah RECOLLET) and Kiki (husband Stephen PELLETIER) of Birch Island and Christopher WAHSQUONAIKEZHIK (wife Carol) of Sudbury. Proud and very loving grandfather of Donnelley, Kigen, Akeshia, Paskwawmotosis, Donald, Assinyawasis, Anthony, Kihiwawasis, Kianna Rae, Waasnode, Christina, Charles and Christopher. Survived by sisters Lillian McGREGOR of Toronto, Shirley McGREGOR of Birch Island and brother Peter McGREGOR of Nova Scotia and brother-in-law Roman BILASH. Also survived by brothers-in-law David (Linda), Ron (Nikki), Dominic (Brenda), and sisters-in-law Veronica (Andrew,) Rosie GAUVREAU (Gordon) and Medora(Don). Predeceased by parents Augustine and Victoria and in-laws David and Agatha MANITOWABI. Also predeceased by brothers Robert E. McGREGOR, Allan A. McGREGOR, and sister, Mary JACKO, Colleen FONT, Estelle CYWINK, Violet BONADIO and Olive McGREGOR and sister-in-law Shirley MANITOWABI McKAY. He was also a special uncle to 67 nieces and nephews.
Rested at the Whitefish River Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at St. Gabriel's Lalamant Church, Birch Island on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 with Father Mike STROGRE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Harry O. BRUMPTON
In loving memory of Harry O. Brumpton who passed away peacefully at his home on January 7, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Beloved husband of the late Juanita (1999). Dear father of Patricia and Ken THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, LaSalle. Dear brother of Margaret WALTER, Hemet, Ca. Also survived by several nieces, nephews and cousins. Mr. BRUMPTON was the former Commissioner of Parks and Recreation for the City of Windsor and retired in 1982 after 23 years of service. He served with the R.C.A.F. during WW2. Harry will be missed by many Friends in McGregor Bay, especially Ann and Godfrey McGREGOR, with whom he held a special relationship. Upon his death, Mr. BRUMPTON honoured the Whitefish River First Nation Community by making a generous bequeathment towards a student bursary.
Visitation was held at The Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. E. The funeral service was held on Thursday January 9, 2003 with Reverend Paul ALMOND officiating. Cremation with interment later in St. Christopher's Church Cemetery, McGregor Bay, Ontario.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
McGREGOR- BILASH, Olive - Birch Island
January 30, 1936 to March 6, 1998.
"When I Fly, I Fly!"
Far above the earth she soars,
Circling the clear sky.
Flying over forests dim,
Peering in shadows,
Seeking far and wide,
Her children
To give them peace.
In loving memory of our Mother and Grandmother whose Spirit remains in our hearts forever,
Dean McGREGOR Family.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Rick FRANCIS
Funeral services for Mr. Rick FRANCIS, age 47 years, who died Saturday, May 17, 2003, were held on Tuesday evening in the Blake Funeral Chapel in Thunder Bay, ON, led by Reverend Larry KROKER of Saint Anne's Church. Eulogies were offered by Kevin MAIN, Jaymie PENNY, Paul FRANCIS, Jennifer O'NEIL and Tamara BROWN. Numerous co-workers from the city of Thunder Bay, fellow coaches from minor hockey, neighbors, Friends and family attended the service. Removal was then made to Little Current, for visitation and Funeral Mass in Saint Bernard's Church celebrated by Reverend Bert FOLIOT S.J. on Thursday, May 22, 2003. The readings were proclaimed by Celina McGREGOR, Jennifer KEYS, Raquel KOENIG and PollyAnna McNALLY. Eulogies were offered by Kerry FRANCIS, Raymond FRANCIS, Jenny McGRAW, Paul FRANCIS and Ruthanne FRANCIS. The offertory gifts were presented by Kerry and Brenda FRANCIS. The Soloist was Rosa PITAWANAKWAT- BURK/BURKE accompanied by the organist Thomas NESHIKWE. Services were largely attended by long time Friends, members of Saint Bernard Church, and family. Honourary Pallbearers were Jeff FRANCIS and David LARSON. The Active Pallbearers were Allan ESHKAWKOGAN, Paul FRANCIS Jr., Robert McGRAW Jr., Craig KOENIG, Mike McNALLY and Chris KEYS.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Genevieve Anne Dorothy McGREGOR
In loving memory of Zigos Genevieve Anne Dorothy McGREGOR who began her spiritual journey May 22, 2003 at Saint Peter's Health Care Centre, Hamilton, Ontario where she was met by her mother Julia RECOLLET McGREGOR and her father William McGREGOR Sr., and sisters Agnes, Helen, Florence, Barbara, Mary Louise, Marion, Susan and Veronica for their awaited reunion. Left to carry on her memory, love, kindness and generosity are her brothers Arthur and wife Violet, George, Murray Sr., and wife Marion McGREGOR all of Birch Island, her nephew Greg and his wife Linda McGREGOR of Barrie, and her best friend Betty CALDWELL of Hamilton. Also, survived by many nieces and nephews, grand nieces and nephews. Sadly missed by her relatives and Friends in Birch Island and her neighbours in Hamilton.
Visitation and wake service were held at the Whitefish River First Nation Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at Saint Gabriel Lalemant on Monday May 26, 2003 with Reverend Michael STOGRE S.J. officiating. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-30 published
McGREGOR, Allan " Uncle Pit-Birch" Island
December 6, 1933-August 1, 1992.
O Great Spirit
Whose voice we hear in the winds,
And whose breath gives life to all the world,
Hear us.
We are small and weak.
We need your strength and wisdom.
-Always remembered. Dean McGREGOR Family.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY
In loving memory of Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY, May 7, 1920 to August 13, 2003.
Beloved wife of George Bruce TOOLEY of Steinbach Manitoba. Loving mother of Brucette WATERSON (Doug), Theodore (Betty), Juanita BROWN (Buster), Andre (Gail). Predeceased by sons Douglas and James. Loving grandmother of Crystal (Mark), Michael (Nancy), Jennifer (Paul), Jason, Sonny, Evelyn (Corey), Justin (Brandy), Jesse (Crystal), Lynette, Shawee, Teri, predeceased by Sean (Brucette), Bruce (Andre). Great Grandmother of Fern, Miah, Natashia, Alexandra, Brooklyn, Riley, Cameron, Tristen and Trinity. Sister of Rose (Harold) DOOLEY and Geraldine (Carl) ZIEGLER of Little Current, Oscar McGREGOR, Godfrey (Ann) and Jean-Mary Jane (Lawrence) ANDREWS of Birch Island. Predeceased by parents Dave and Louise McGREGOR, Theresa, Blanche, Theodore, Gordon (Rebecca), and Evelyn. Sister-in-law of Roy (Bernice), Jim (Betty), Fred (Dianne) and Velma (predeceased). Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Sunday, August 17, 2003 at the Birch Island Community Centre. Funeral service was held on August 19, 2003 at St. Gabriel Lalement Roman Catholic Church. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery, Birch Island, Ontario. Reverend Michael STOGRE officiating.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Norma PITAWANAKWAT (née MISINISHKOTEWE)
In loving memory of Norma PITAWANAKWAT (née MISINISHKOTEWE) at the age of 73 years. Thursday, October 2, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current.
Beloved wife of Ignatius PITAWANAKWAT (predeceased.) Loving mother of Inez (Joe), Jackie (Lenny), Ignatius (Carolyne), Howard (Kim), Arlene (John), Troy (Cindy), Victor (Rose), Carmen, Barry (Patty), Emmett (Adele), Jerome (Tammy Jo), Bruno (predeceased), Florice Esmma Marie (predeceased) and "granddaughter" Delores. Loving daughter of Joseph and Agnes McGREGOR (both predeceased.) Proud grandmother of 38 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren. Dear sister of Wilbert (predeceased), Verna (predeceased), Jim (wife Georgine predeceased), Larry, Dennis, Sara (Ron) and Elaine (John). Sadly missed by many nephews, nieces and Friends. Also predeceased by sisters-in-law Elizabeth PITAWANAKWAT and Susan CYWINK, and brothers-in-law, John, Edgar and Andre. Also survived by: Albert (June), Lillian and Genevieve PITAWANAKWAT, and brother-in-law Bill CYWINK and son-in-law Robert HOWELL.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
McGREGOR
-In loving memory of Donald GREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Safely Home
I am home in Heaven, my beloved ones,
I am so happy here and everything is so bright
There is perfect joy and beauty
In this everlasting light.
Every pain and grief I ever felt is over,
Every restless tossing passed
I am now at peace forever
Safely home in heaven.
Did you wonder why I so suddenly left
I was on my way to cut a Christmas tree for my wife,
Then I heard the Creator call my name.
His love illuminated every step of the way
As I bravely answered his call.
He came Himself to meet me
I did not find it hard to leave
With His own loving arm to lean on
I had not one doubt or dread to follow Him.
You must not grieve for me anymore
Just remember me with loving thoughts, the good times we had.
I love each one of you dearly still, my son and my daughters and
your spouses and all my grandchildren. I will always watch over you.
My spirit lives on in each of you, just remember that.
Try to look beyond the milky way, the stairway to
the spirit world. Pray to trust our Creator's will.
My work was all completed when He called me home.
One day you will hear your Anishnabe name called too
And oh, the rapture of that meeting, the joy to see you come.
-Lovingly remembered by Mary Grace.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
McGREGOR
-In loving memory of our dear grandfather, Donald Sr. December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
What I would give if I could say
"Hello Pappa" in the same old way
To hear your voice and see your smile
Or just to sit and chat a while.
I was not there to say goodbye
Perhaps it was just as well,
Because I lost a piece of my heart
The night you fell.
To my loving pappa, I loved so much,
I'll never forget your gentle touch
I mourn for you in silence
No eyes could see me weep
But only a silent tear is shed
While others are fast asleep.
-With love always, everyday Baamaapiikwaabmin! Kigen, Anthony and Kiana.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
McGREGOR
-In loving memory of a dear dad, Donald Sr., December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
His smiling way and pleasant face
Are a pleasure to recall,
He had a kindly word for each
And died beloved by all.
Some day we hope to meet him
Some day, we know not when,
To clasp his hand in the better land,
Never to part again.
-Love always to you dad, Kiki.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
McGREGOR
-In loving memory of a wonderful Dad and Poppa, Donald Sr., who passed away December 20, 2002.
He meant so much to us
But nothing we can say
Can tell the sadness in our hearts
As we think of him each day.
He always was true and tender
He lived his life for those he loved
And those he loved, remember.
--Loving you always, missing you every day. Lucy-Ann, Donnie, Donnelley, Akeshia, Little Man.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
Robert Marven SYER
Born February 19, 1912 at Thamesville, Ontario, died May 15, 2003 at Oakville, Ontario, late of Oakville (Bronte) and lastly of Burlington Ontario; predeceased by parents Frank Morgan SYER (1923) and Maud Lillian SYER (née) (1969,) and by brother Ralph Evans SYER (1932;) survived by his wife of 63 years, Frances Teresa SYER (née,) and seven children: Robert Marven (Marg HEEMSKERK) of Toronto, David Dirk (Mimi CHAMPAGNE) of Shelburne Nova Scotia, Susan Frances (Brian RIKLEY) of Hudson Québec, Michael Stanley of Oakville, Timothy William (Marilyn MacGREGOR) of Milton Ontario, Deborah Anne (Barry BALL) of Brampton Ontario and Dani Elizabeth (Brian FINNEY) of Orlando Florida; and by fifteen grandchildren: Sheri Lynne SYER (Michael PINNOCK) of San Jose California, Wendy Frances SYER (Kevin OUGH) of Peterborough Ontario and Julia Helen SYER (Pat PELLEGRINI) of Ajax Ontario; David Dirk SYER (Doris HOO) of Whitby Ontario and Judith Gail SUSLA (Joe SUSLA) of Oakville Brian Joseph Rikley (Eva GJERSTAD) and Toni Lauren RIKLEY (Dave KRINDLE) of Hudson; Cassidy Anne SYER (Danny PIETRONIRO) of Montréal, Michael Timothy SYER of Victoria, British Columbia and Robert Christopher SYER of London Ontario; Thomas William SYER and Douglas Donald SYER of Milton; and Hayley Elizabeth FINNEY, Brian James FINNEY and Kyle James FINNEY of Orlando; and by nine great-grandchildren: Skylar Syer OUGH of Peterborough and Julian Robert Domenico PELLEGRINI of Ajax; Robert Marven SYER, James Michael SYER and David Dirk SYER of Whitby and Erin Nicole SUSLA of Oakville; and Austin Tyler RIKLEY- KRINDLE, David Shane RIKLEY- KRINDLE and Joseph Cody RIKLEY- KRINDLE of Hudson; also, by nephew Richard Frank SYER of Lake Placid Florida, grand-nephew Michael Charles SYER of Ann Arbor Michigan and by brother-in-law Dr. Patrick Gaynor LYNES of Brampton and his family. An Anglican graveside service was held at St. Jude's Cemetery in Oakville on May 22, 2003. Expressions of respect may be sent to the family at 2455 Milltower Court Mississauga, Ontario L5N 5Z6 or by eMail to RMS@The RMSGroup.net gifts may be made to a charity of choice. A child is sleeping: An old man gone. ­ James Joyce

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
The crash of a Canadian hero
Lest we forget, Roy MacGREGOR traces the spectacular feats and the sad fall of a flying ace
By Roy MacGREGOR, Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - Page A1
Ottawa -- Here is as good a place as any to lay a small poppy on Remembrance Day.
It is nothing but a concrete dock ramp on the Ontario shore of the Ottawa River, not far downstream from the Parliament Buildings.
There is nothing here to say what happened that cold March day back in 1930, and on this, a fine brisk morning in November, 73 years later, there is only a lone biker, a man walking two setters along the path that twists along this quiet spot, and a small, single-engine airplane revving in the background as it prepares to take off from the little Rockcliffe airstrip.
Seventy-three years ago, another small plane took off from this airfield, turned sharply over the distant trees, flew low and full-throttle over the runway and went into a steep climb that eventually cut out the engine and sent the new Fairchild twisting toward this spot -- instantly killing Canada's most-decorated war hero.
Will BARKER, 35, of Dauphin, Manitoba
Perhaps you've heard of him. Likely not. He is, in some ways, the test case for Lest We Forget.
Lieutenant-Colonel William George BARKER won the Victoria Cross for what many believe was the greatest dogfight of the First World War.
He was alone in his Sopwith Snipe over Bois de Marmal, France, on October 27, 1918, when he was attacked, official reports say, by 60 enemy aircraft -- Mr. BARKER, who rarely talked of his war experience, always said 15 -- and he shot down three before passing out from devastating wounds to both legs and his arm, only to come to again in mid-air, turn on the fighter intending to put an end to him and bring down a fourth before he himself crash-landed in full view of astonished British troops, who were even more amazed when they got to the plane and found him still alive, if barely.
The four that one day took Mr. BARKER's list to 50 downed aircraft. He returned to Canada as Lt.-Col. William George BARKER, V.C., D.S.O. and enough other medals to lay claim to being Canada's most honoured combatant -- if he'd ever cared to do so. As British Air Chief Marshal Sir Philip JOUBERT wrote, "Of all the flyers of the two World Wars, none was greater than BARKER."
He came home and went into the aviation business with another Canadian Victoria Cross winner, Billy BISHOP. He married Mr. BISHOP's wealthy cousin, Jean SMITH, and had a miserable next dozen years. The business failed, the marriage teetered, he suffered depression and terrible pain from his injuries, and the previous non-drinker soon became a drinker.
It seemed life was taking a turn for the better in January of 1930 when Fairchild hired him to help sell planes to the Canadian government. A test pilot had been sent to show off the plane at Rockcliffe, but the veteran fighter unfortunately insisted on taking it up himself for a run.
Some say he committed suicide here; some say he was showing off for an 18-year-old daughter of another Rockcliffe pilot; his biographer believes he was just being too aggressive with a new, unknown machine and "screwed up."
They held the funeral in Toronto, with a cortege two miles long, 2,000 uniformed men, honour guards from four countries and 50,000 people lining the streets. As they carried the coffin into Mount Pleasant Cemetery, six biplanes swooped down, sprinkling rose petals over the crowd.
"His name," Sir Arthur CURRIE announced, "will live forever in the annals of the country which he served so nobly."
His name, alas, is not even on the crypt -- only " SMITH," his wife's snobbish family who never really accepted the rough-hewn outsider from Manitoba.
Somehow, he became all but forgotten. Though Mr. BISHOP called Mr. BARKER "the deadliest air fighter that ever lived," it is Mr. BISHOP who lives on in the public imagination. Often, if Mr. BARKER is mentioned at all, "Billy" BARKER, as he was known to his air colleagues, is confused with "Billy" BISHOP.
A request for a government plaque to commemorate his Manitoba birthplace was rejected the first time, but there is now some small recognition thanks in large part to the work of Inky MARK, the Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan Lake and the excellent military biography, BARKER VC, produced a few years back by Wayne RALPH.
Mr. RALPH, a Newfoundlander now living in White Rock, British Columbia, thinks Mr. BARKER was simply too much "the warrior" for the Canadian appetite.
"He was an international superstar," says Mr. RALPH. " BARKER had all the traits of the great Hollywood heroes. He was disobedient, gregarious, flamboyant. He was a frontier kid, a classical figure in the American style of hero. Born in a log cabin, went on to fame and fortune, and died tragically at 35.
"Now he is basically buried in anonymity. To me, it's the perfect metaphor for Canada, where we bury our past."
Today, though, even if it is only a poppy dropped at the end of a concrete boat ramp, we will remember.

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McGREGOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
'What else could it have been but a miracle?'
Rene CAISSE died 25 years ago without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved. Without Essiac, her mysterious remedy, they wouldn't be alive today, they tell Roy MacGREGOR
By Roy MacGREGOR, Saturday, December 13, 2003 - Page F8
Bracebridge, Ontario -- These days, when she looks back at her remarkable, and largely unexpected, long life, Iona HALE will often permit herself a small, soft giggle.
She is 85 now, a vibrant, spunky woman with enough excess energy to power the small off-highway nursing home she now lives in at the north end of the Muskoka tourist region that gave the world Norman BETHUNE and, Iona HALE will die believing, possibly something far more profound.
A possible cure for cancer.
Twenty-seven years ago, Mrs. HALE sat in Toronto's Princess Margaret Hospital and heard that terrifying word applied to her own pitiful condition. She was 58, and had already dropped to 75 pounds when her big, truck-driver husband, Ted, finally got her in to see the specialists who were supposed to know why she had stopped eating and was in such terrible pain.
Mrs. HALE remembers awakening in the recovery room after unsuccessful surgery and being told by a brusque nurse, "You're not going to live long, you know, dear."
"That's what you think!" she snapped back.
Ted HALE had often heard stories of a secret "Indian" medicine that an area nurse had supposedly used to cure cancer patients, but he had no idea where it could be found. He had asked a physician, only to be told, "That damned Essiac -- there's nothing to it."
When they returned to their home near Huntsville, Ontario -- with instructions to come back in three weeks, if Mrs. HALE was still around -- Mr. HALE set out to find the mysterious medicine. With the help of a sympathetic doctor, he discovered Rene CAISSE, a Bracebridge nurse who claimed to have been given the native secret back in 1922. Pushing 90 and in ill health, she agreed to give him one small bottle of the tonic, telling him to hide it under his clothes as he left.
Mr. HALE fed his wife the medicine as tea, as instructed, and it was the first thing she was able to keep down. A few radiation treatments intended to ease the pain seemingly had no effect, but almost immediately after taking the Essiac, she felt relief. When the painkillers ran out and Mr. HALE said he would go pick up more, she told him, "Don't bother -- get more of this."
Twice more, he returned to get Essiac, the second time carrying a loaded pistol in case he had to force the medicine from the old nurse. He got it, and, according to Mrs. HALE, "the cancer just drained away." She returned to Toronto for one checkup -- "The doctor just looked at me like he was seeing a ghost" -- and never returned again.
"What else could it have been," Mrs. HALE asks today, "but a miracle?"
There is nothing special to mark the grave of Rene CAISSE.
It lies in the deepening snow at the very front row of St. Joseph's Cemetery on the narrow road running north out this small town in the heart of Ontario cottage country, a simple grave with a dark stone that reads: " McGAUGHNEY Rene M. (CAISSE) 1888-1978, Discoverer of 'Essiac,' Dearly Remembered."
On December 26, it will be 25 years since Rene -- pronounced "Reen" by locals -- CAISSE died. But in the minds of many people with cancer, the great question of her life has continued on, unanswered, well beyond her death. Did she have a secret cure for the disease?
Ms. CAISSE never claimed to have a "cure" for cancer, but she did claim to have a secret native formula that, at the very least, alleviated pain and, in some cases, seemed to work what desperate cancer sufferers were claiming were miracles.
She had discovered the formula while caring for an elderly Englishwoman who had once been diagnosed with breast cancer and, unable to afford surgery, turned instead to a Northern Ontario Ojibwa medicine man who had given her a recipe for a helpful tonic.
The materials were all found locally, free in the forest: burdock root, sheep sorrel, slippery elm bark, wild rhubarb root and water.
The woman had taken the native brew regularly and been cancer-free ever since.
Ms. CAISSE had carefully written down the formula as dictated, thinking she might herself turn to this forest concoction if she ever developed the dreaded disease. She never did, dying eventually from complications after breaking a hip, but she remembered the recipe when an aunt was diagnosed with cancer of the stomach and given six months to live. The aunt agreed to try the tonic, recovered and went on to live 21 more years.
The aunt's doctor, R.D. FISHER, was intrigued enough that he encouraged Ms. CAISSE to offer her remedy -- which she now called "Essiac," a reverse spelling of her name -- to others, and by 1926 Dr. FISHER and eight other physicians were petitioning the Department of Health and Welfare to conduct tests on this strange brew.
"We, the undersigned," the letter from the nine doctors read, "believe that the 'Treatment for Cancer' given by nurse R.M. CAISSE can do no harm and that it relieves pain, will reduce the enlargement and will prolong life in hopeless cases."
Instead of opening doors, however, the petition caused them to slam. Health and Welfare responded that a nurse had no right to treat patients and even went so far as to prepare the papers necessary to begin prosecution proceedings.
But when officials were dispatched to see her, she talked them out of taking action, and for years after, officials turned a blind eye as she continued to disperse the tonic. She made no claim that it was medication; she refused to see anyone who had not first been referred by their regular physician; and she turned down all payment apart from small "donations" to keep the clinic running.
Her work attracted the attention of Dr. Frederick BANTING, the discoverer of insulin, but an arrangement to work together foundered when he insisted they test the tonic first on mice, and Ms. CAISSE argued that humans had more immediate needs.
Her problems with authority were only beginning. A 55,000-signature petition persuaded the Ontario government to establish a royal commission to look into her work, but the panel of physicians would agree to hear only from 49 of the 387 witnesses: who turned up on her behalf -- and dismissed all but four on the grounds that they had no diagnostic proof. The commission refused to endorse Essiac, and a private member's bill that would have let her continue treating patients at her clinic fell three votes short in the legislature.
She quit when the stress drove her to the verge of collapse, moved north with her new husband, Charles McGAUGHNEY, and dropped out of the public eye. But not out of the public interest.
"You need proof?" laughs Iona HALE. " Just look at me -- I'm still here!"
Not everyone in the medical establishment dismissed Essiac. Ms. CAISSE had permitted the Brusch Medical Center near Boston to conduct experiments after Dr. Charles BRUSCH, one-time physician to John Kennedy, inquired about the mysterious cure. Tests on the formula did show some promise on mice, and the centre eventually reported: "The doctors do not say that Essiac is a cure, but they do say it is of benefit." Dr. BRUSCH even claimed that Essiac helped in his own later battle with cancer.
Other tests, though, were less encouraging. In the early 1970s, Ms. CAISSE sent some of her herbs to the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in Rye, New York but when early tests proved negative, she claimed Sloan-Kettering had completely fouled up the preparation and refused further assistance.
Through it all, she refused to disclose her recipe -- until a rush of publicity after a 1977 article in Homemaker's magazine persuaded her to hand over the formula to the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario for safekeeping and to give a copy to the Resperin Corporation of Toronto in the hopes that, eventually, scientific proof would be found.
She died without gaining the recognition some cancer survivors believe she deserved, and in 1982, the federal government declared Resperin's testing procedures flawed and shut down further studies.
The story of Ms. CAISSE's medicine carried on, however, with more and more people turning to the man who would have been her member of Parliament to see if he could help.
Stan DARLING lives in the same nursing home as Iona HALE. Now 92, Mr. DARLING spent 21 years in Ottawa as the Progressive Conservative member for Muskoka-Parry Sound. He's remembered on Parliament Hill for his crusades against acid rain, but of all his political battles, Mr. DARLING says nothing compares to his fight to gain recognition for Rene CAISSE's mysterious medicine.
"So many people came to me with their stories," he said, "that I couldn't help but say, 'Okay, there must be something to this.'"
Mr. DARLING put together his own petition, 5,000 names, and went to the minister of health and argued that so many were now using Essiac it made sense to legalize it.
His bid failed, but he did persuade the medical bureaucrats to compromise: If Essiac were seen as a "tea" rather than a "drug," it could be viewed as a tonic, and so long as the presiding physician gave his approval, it could be added to a patient's care -- if only for psychological reasons. "On that basis," Mr. DARLING says, "I said, 'I don't give a damn what you call it, as long as you let the people get it.' "
The doubters are legion. "There's no evidence that it works," says Dr. Christina MILLS, senior adviser of cancer control policy for the Canadian Cancer Society. That being said, she says, "There is also little evidence of harmful side effects from it," but cautions anyone looking into the treatment to do so in consultation with their physician.
No scientific study of Essiac has ever appeared in an accepted, peer-reviewed medical journal. But those who believe say they have given up on seeing such proof.
Sue BEST of Rockland, Massachusetts., still vividly recalls that day 10 years ago when her 16-year-old son, Billy, sick with Hodgkin's disease, decided to run away from home rather than continue the chemotherapy treatments he said were killing him.
He was eventually found in Texas after a nationwide hunt and agreed to return home only if the treatments would cease and they would look into alternative treatments, including Essiac.
No one is certain what exactly cured Billy, but Ms. BEST was so convinced Essiac was a major factor she became a local distributor of the herbal medicine.
Rene CAISSE, she says, "spent a whole life trying to help people with a product she found out about totally by accident -- and being totally maligned all her life by the whole medical establishment in Canada."
In some ways, Ms. CAISSE has had an easier time in death than in life. Today, there is a street in Bracebridge named after her, a charming sculpture of her in a park near her old clinic, and Bracebridge Publishing has released a book, Bridge of Hope, about her experiences.
The recognition is largely the work of local historian Ken VEITCH, whose grandmother, Eliza, was one of the cancer-afflicted witnesses: who told the 1939 royal commission: "I owe my life to Miss CAISSE. I would have been dead and in my grave months ago." Instead, she lived 40 more years.
Don McVITTIE, a Huntsville businessman, is a grandnephew of Rene CAISSE and says she used her recipe to cure him of a duodenal ulcer when he was 19. Now 71 and in fine health, he still has his nightly brew of Essiac before bed.
"There's something mentally satisfying about having a glass of it," he says. "I think of it more as a blood cleanser. That's what Aunt Rene always said it was. I think she'd be disappointed it hasn't been more accepted."
"Look," Ken VEITCH says, "this all started back in the 1920s. And I've said a number of times that if there was nothing to it, it would be long gone.
"But there is something to it."
Roy MacGREGOR is a Globe and Mail columnist.
The secret revealed
Debate rages in Essiac circles about the correct recipe. The most accurate rendition likely comes from Mary McPHERSON, Rene CAISSE's long-time assistant. Ms. McPHERSON, currently frail and living in a Bracebridge nursing home, swore an affidavit in 1994 in which she recorded the recipe in front of witnesses. It is essentially the same preparation distributed today by Essiac Canada International, which operates out of Ottawa. The formula appears below:
61/2 cups of burdock root (cut)
1 lb. of sheep sorrelherb, powdered
1/4 lb. of slipper elm bark, powdered
1 oz. of Turkish rhubarb root, powdered
Mix ingredients thoroughly and store in glass jar in dark, dry cupboard. Use 1 oz. of herb mixture to 32 oz. of water, depending on the amount you want to make. I use 1 cup of mixture to 256 oz. of water.
Boil hard for 10 minutes (covered), then turn off heat but leave sitting on warm plate overnight (covered).
In the morning, heat steaming hot and let settle a few minutes, then strain through fine strainer into hot sterilized bottles and sit to cool. Store in dark, cool cupboard. Must be refrigerated when opened.

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