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"McKE" 2003 Obituary


MCKEE  MCKEITH  MCKELL  MCKELVEY  MCKENNA  MCKENNEY  MCKENNITT  MCKENZIE  MCKESSOCK  MCKETT 

McKEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
Sheila Anne HAMILTON Sept. 18, 1930 - Feb. 26, 2003
Sheila Anne HAMILTON died unexpectedly in her daughter's Ocala, Florida home following surgery on a broken leg. She lived until the 1970s in Hamilton and Ancaster, Ontario, where her family owned Royal Oak Dairy. She is survived and greatly missed by her son Scott McKEE of Courtenay, British Columbia, her daughter Jane HAMILTON and Jane's spouse Joy MASUHARA, both of Vancouver, her granddaughters Sarah HAMILTON of Japan and Meghann HAMILTON of Vancouver, and her daughter Sally McKEE and grand_son Corey THOMAS of Ocala, Florida, along with her brother, Donald HAMILTON and his wife Pat HAMILTON of Burlington, Ontario, several cousins, her late sister Jane's husband, Fred WRIGHT and their five children, especially Liza ALLAN. She was an Registered Nurse Anesthetist and Licensed Practical Nurse as well as a master seamstress with her own business selling children's heirloom clothing. She was keenly interested in interior design and was a master chef along with a skilled gardener who most loved red roses. She had an infectious sense of humour and a true zest for living. Services were private. Cremation was followed by the scattering of her ashes at sea off Key Largo. Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to the Humane Society.

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McKEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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McKEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
KELLY, Thomas Patrick " Tim" (1922 - 2003)
Tim KELLY of Bromley Avenue, Moncton, died peacefully at the Moncton Hospital on Monday October 27, 2003. He was born in Toronto on October 18, 1922 and was the son of the late Emmett and Barbara (DOLLY) KELLY. Tim worked as a senior executive with Canadian Marconi Company, Montreal, Quebec and a business owner of the electronics distributor Keldon Electronics Limited, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In 1979 he established the Moncton, New Brunswick based consumer electronics retailer, Sounds Fantastic Atlantic Limited. As a business leader Tim had a gift for marketing and financial management. He built a strong business that grew and flourished well after his retirement in 1986, which is a legacy to his sound planning and leadership. He was one of the original believers in the United Way and was an active member of the Elks Lodge of Moncton since 1979. As well Tim served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-1945. Tim is survived by his wife of 54 years, Ivy Anita (née TRUMBLEY) and seven children: Brian (Lynne ARSENEAULT) of Peterborough, Steve of Dieppe, Jeff (Lila DONOVAN) of Moncton, Brad (Sandra THORBURN) of Edmonton, Scott (Jamie PENFOLD) of Moncton, Jan KOSHYLANYK (Terry) of Ancaster and Jill SMITH (Gary) of Riverview. He will be dearly missed by his 17 grandchildren: Kevin, Autumn, Christopher, Patrick, Jessica, Ryan, Alison, Kieran, Nicholas, Regan, Tyler, Wesley, Stephen, Kaileigh, Brandon, Morgan and Talia, as well his 2 great grand_sons Carter and William. He is also survived by his sisters Bernie KELLY of Beaconsfield and Barbara MURPHY (Ted) Uxbridge, and a brother Paul of Ottawa. He was predeceased by brothers Fred and Jim. Visiting hours will be held at Cadman's Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 with parish prayers to be held at the funeral home Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held from St. Bernard's Catholic Church on Friday October 31 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter McKEE officiating. The interment will take place at Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery, Dieppe. Donations to the memorial of the donor's choice would be appreciated by the family. The family would like to thank the staff at both the Dr. George L. Dumont Hospital and the Moncton Hospital for the professional and loving care that they provided to Tim, as well to our family over the last few months. There are truly many angels at both our hospitals. www.cadmansfh.com

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McKEITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
WRIGHT, Ruth Bailey Murrell, October 13, 1907-December 13, 2003
Died in Arnprior and District Memorial Hospital on Saturday evening, Ruth Murrell WRIGHT of Cedar Cove (R.R.#2 White Lake, Ontario) in her 97th year, beloved wife of the late Gilbert Owen Murrell WRIGHT (1980,) dear mother of Peter Murrell WRIGHT (Satu Repo) of Toronto, James Robert Murrell WRIGHT of Cedar Cove, Margaret May (Gordon) McKEITH of Bjorkdale, Saskatchewan, John Cohoe WRIGHT of Cedar Cove and David Edgar (Theresa) MURRELL- WRIGHT of Ottawa, dear grandmother of Daniel Peter (Megan), Susan Marie, Laura Ruth, Joan Murrell (David), Michael Gilbert, Brian Albert, Allan Wesley, Owen Robert (Karen), Mary Ruth (Paul), Leslie Anne and Robert David, great-grandmother of Christine, Jennifer, Kyle, Michael, Dominic, Thomas and Quinn.
Ruth was raised and educated in Eastern Canada and the United States graduating from the University of Rochester in 1931, shortly after her marriage to Gilbert they moved to Edmonton in 1933, on to Camrose in 1941 and to Saskatoon in 1945, they survived the depression while raising their children. One of Ruth's finest achievements was as the matron of the Saskatoon Convalescent Home from 1959 to 1981. In 1986 she returned to Ontario where she was one of the owners of Cedar Cove on White Lake near Arnprior. During her last years she courageously coped with blindness and very much appreciated the talking books provided by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind Resting at The Boyce Funeral Home, Chapel, Visitation and Reception Centre, 138 Daniel St. N., Arnprior where Friends may pay their respects on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 after 10: 30 a.m., funeral service will be conducted in The Boyce Chapel at 11: 30 a.m. with Reverend Bill SIMONS officiating. Interment of cremated remains will be in Woodlawn Cemetery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. In memoriams to The Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated by her family.

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McKELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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McKELVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
TRUSCOTT, Peggy (née SAULT)
Peggy lived her life as a beautiful, special person who brought joy, love and light to everyone she touched. Her kindness, compassion and overwhelming energy to help others was ever present from her days as a nurse at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital and the Victorian Order of Nurses, to her work as a nursing instructor at Centennial College and as a public health nurse for the City of Toronto. A wife, a mother, a daughter, a sister and a wonderful friend. Peggy lived courageously with ovarian cancer for the last four years, her strength, positive outlook and love of life never wavering. Peggy died peacefully at home, on May 25th, 2003, wrapped in the love of her husband and best friend Bruce and her daughters - Sarah, Rebecca and Martha and son-in-law Josh KESTER. Peggy will be dearly missed by all who knew her including her parents John and Beth SAULT, her in-laws Marg and Os TRUSCOTT, her siblings Mary McKELVEY (Max,) Cathie HUGHES (Wayne,) John SAULT (Linda,) Barb SAULT (Liz THOMAS,) Patty BONTJE (Michael) as well as by her many Friends, cousins, nieces and nephews. We wish to thank Dr. J. STURGEON and Dr. D. DEPETRILLO (Princess Margaret Hospital), Dr. J. MEHARCHAND (Toronto East General Hospital), Dr. J. RIEGER (Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care,) and nurses Barb MOFFAT and Ann Marie HOGAN (St. Elizabeth Health Care) for their compassionate and supportive care. At Peggy's request, a private cremation has occurred, arranged by The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre. A service celebrating her life will be held for family and Friends at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 10365 Islington Ave, Kleinburg, Ontario (905-893-1121) on Monday, June 2nd, 2003 at 5: 30 p.m. The family extends a warm welcome to all who wish to join them. In lieu of flowers, we encourage donations to the National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto M4W 2N2 (416-962-2700). In September 2002 Peggy founded the first annual ''Walk of Hope'' to raise awareness about ovarian cancer. Please join us on September 7th, 2003 at the second annual National Ovarian Cancer Association ''Walk of Hope'' and remember Peggy. Further details will be available at: www.ovariancanada.org

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McKELVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-27 published
SAULT, John Henry (1918 - 2003)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Friday, October 24, 2003 surrounded by his wife and family. Loving husband of Beth (HARRISON) for over 60 years. Great Dad to Mary (Max McKELVEY,) the late Peggy (Bruce TRUSCOTT), Cathie (Wayne HUGHES), John (Linda), Barb (Liz THOMAS,) Patty (Michael BONTJE.) Wonderful Grampa who will be missed particularly at Boshkung Lake by his grandchildren Keith, Andrew and Heather McKELVEY; Sarah, Rebecca (Josh KESTER), and Martha TRUSCOTT; Alison, Calum and Jeremy HUGHES; Harrison and Alex BONTJE. Predeceased by sister Helen (SAULT) LINDSAY whose children looked to him as a mentor and guide. Special Uncle to his many nieces and nephews. Jock, affectionately known as ''Saltie'' was a long-time salesman for the Canadian Salt Company. Along with a busy career and active family life, Jock coached hockey, golfed and drove the water-ski-boat. He was a dedicated Big Brother, Boy Scout Leader and Elder at Forest Hill United Church. Later in life he volunteered with North Toronto Meals on Wheels. He served a term as Mayor of Donarvon Park, Boshkung Lake and spent a cherished year as President of the Boshkung Lake Cottagers Association ending the summer by holding the First Annual Presidents Ball. A large man who loved life, he will be missed by his family, many relatives, Friends and co-workers. Jock was well known for his favourite saying, ''It's great to be alive''.The family extends sincere gratitude to the staff at Kingsway Retirement Home and the Trillium Health Centre (Mississauga) for their devoted and professional care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. West at Windermere, east of the Jane subway from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm, Monday; Memorial Service in the Chapel on Tuesday October 28, 2003 at 3: 00 pm. If desired a donation may be made to National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto, Ontario Canada, M4W 2N2.

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McKENNA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
Andre HAMER
By Nancy Hamer STRAHL, Art McDONALD and Patty CARSON
Thursday, March 20, 2003 - Page A24
Husband, father, family man, scientist, traveller. Born January 17, 1968, in Oshawa, Ontario Died February 2 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, age 35.
Andre came from a family where education came naturally. He was raised in a stimulating environment, by loving parents who fostered his natural curiosity and provided him with ample learning opportunities by 17, Kant and Nietzsche were his bedtime favourites. Andre was very proud of his Belgian ancestry and visited his family's homeland many times. He and his sister loved to travel and shared this love during the teenage years -- from visiting the top of the Alps to the dismantling of the Berlin Wall.
He studied at the University of Toronto, and later earned an M.Sc. and PhD in experimental physics from Queen's University in Kingston where he met his future wife, Rosalie McKENNA. A mutual friend thought they would be perfect for each other (because they both loved old movies) and arranged for them to meet. It was February 9th -- and it was love at first sight. The clincher came when Andre said "Get it, got it, good!" and Rosalie immediately recognized the line from an old Danny Kaye movie. For Valentine's Day, Rosalie sent Andre a single red rose.
When they were married, their reception was held in the grand "train" room in Ottawa's Museum of Science and Technology. It was perfect. In the background was man's testament to our quest for knowledge and in the foreground (like an old movie with Doris Day singing Que sera, sera) were two young lovers alighting from the train, beginning life's journey.
That life journey soon included fatherhood. Andre was patient and loving with Patrick and Michael. He read to the boys each day, passing on his love of reading.
Andre loved science and he was particularly good at experimental science. Everything he did was done to completion, starting with innovative concepts and continuing to the finished product that did its intended job 100 per cent -- nothing less. He was regarded as one of the very best young particle astrophysicists in the world. He played a central role in the success of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, thus contributing directly to our current knowledge of the universe. Andre developed the central calibration device for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment for his doctoral thesis at Queen's University, carried out major analyses essential for Sudbury Neutrino Observatory's success as a post-doctoral fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and presented the major results from Sudbury Neutrino Observatory at the American Physical Society meetings in April, 2002. His legacy in science continues as his contributions are used every day by his colleagues at Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.
Andre lived by his personal motto "L'espoir fait vivre" (hope gives life). He loved to listen to his mother's inspiring stories of Grandmother Lea's use of this motto during their fight to survive the Second World War. Throughout his difficult struggle with cancer, Andre maintained a balance between his intellectual pursuits and caring for his spiritual and physical self. Two days before his untimely death, he was reading articles that summarized our current knowledge of the universe from its most microscopic regions to its farthest distances. Later on, he watched an inspirational video about nature with his son. He and his son Patrick talked about how they would climb mountains and build bridges over the rivers.
On February 7, his family (including some from Belgium), Friends old and new, and colleagues (from as far away as New Mexico), gathered to mourn the passing of a gentle soul and a great scientist. His coffin was adorned with a single red rose. On March 8, his third son, Andre Luc McKenna HAMER, was born.
Nancy is Andre's sister, Art his thesis advisor, Patty his sister-in-law.

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McKENNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
McKENNEY, Gordon J. (Canadian National Railway Pensioner)
At the Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto on Saturday, February 22nd, 2003. Gord McKENNEY formerly of Barrie in his 80th year. Beloved husband of the late Rita. Loving father of Brian and his spouse Jan POYNTER, Wayne and his wife Debbie, Keith and his wife Lisa, Mark and his wife Patricia. Dear grandfather of Tim, Adam, Suzanne, Nicole and James. Survived by his siblings Rose CRAMER, Doris McKENNEY, Mary Lou SCHEMELEFSKY, Raymond McKENNEY, Sharon McKENNEY and Donald McKENNEY. Special companion of Jeanne D'arc DUGUAY of Gogama. Gord will be missed by his extended Duguay family Lise, Carole, Rick, Gilles, Rochelle, Monique and all his Gogama Friends. Friends may call at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home, Clapperton and Worsley Sts., Barrie on Monday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held from Saint Mary's Church, Barrie on Tuesday, February 25th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation. If so desired memorial donations to the Sunnybrook and Women's College Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

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McKENNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
Melba Rosamond SWEET
By Jean BISHOP Monday, May 12, 2003 - Page A16
Pioneer, farmer, daughter, sister, aunt, friend. Born December 20, 1900, in Malahide Township, Ontario Died January 17, in St. Thomas, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 102.
Melba SWEET, youngest child of John and Rosamond McKenney SWEET, was deeply rooted in pioneer tradition.
Beginning in 1842, her grandfather cleared the land and built all the buildings on what came to be her farm, just one road north of Aylmer, Ontario In addition, a tragic event in the McKENNEY family had a great influence on Melba's life. In November, 1869, diphtheria struck. In five weeks time, six of the youngest of the 11 McKENNEY children died as a result. Three years later, a little girl named Rosamond was born. She was Melba's mother. Parents, and siblings ranging in age from 12 to 20, lavished love on this baby and vied with each other to teach her pioneer skills.
Rosamond's three children, Gene, Maud and Melba, thrived in the atmosphere she created with her sunny disposition, great sense of humour and mastery of all sorts of skills from breaking and riding horses to gardening or making hairpin lace.
Melba was a true pioneer, herself. She was in her thirties before electricity came to the farm. That meant cooking and heating with wood, no refrigeration or electric washing machine, milking cows by hand, no indoor bathroom. In those days, if you needed something, you made it yourself. And there wasn't much that was beyond Rosamond's skills -- and that she didn't teach to Melba.
Practically all meat, fruits and vegetables were grown and preserved on the farm. Melba's father used to say, "You won't find any tin cans on this place." Clothes for both women and men were sewn at home; soap was made from wood ashes and lye. This meant working long hours. All her life Melba felt she should rise at 4: 30 a.m. to get everything done.
From an early age she took over food preparation. Cooking on a wood-burning range she produced incredible meals for her family and for parties with Friends. Food was always plentiful and delicious. Melba fondly remembered those years when her sister, Maud, after a few years of teaching and working as a bookkeeper in Detroit, came home to stay. They expanded their mother's gardens, adding extensive plots of spring bulbs along the road and a 50-foot long row of delphiniums for bouquets to decorate the church.
In the winters, Melba and Maud worked on handicrafts with Rosamond, making beautiful quilts and hooked rugs, handmade lingerie and pillow cases with crocheted lace borders and inserts. The years passed so happily that Melba declined several offers of marriage to stay on at home.
Melba and Maud took tender care of their father and mother, who lived to celebrate their 72nd wedding anniversary. Their father lived to the age of 96 and Rosamond, who was born in that house, lived there all her 98 years.
After Maud's death from a heart attack 34 years ago, Melba took over the farm books and work on the grounds. Into her 90s, she mowed two acres of lawn, kept two large freezers filled with food for herself and her farming partner, who worked the dairy farm on shares. She also did seasonal jobs, such as cleaning out eavestroughs or going out an upstairs window onto the kitchen roof to put on storm windows.
Determined to live life in her own way, Melba managed to stay in her home with the help of good Friends and homecare workers until a fall put her in hospital in May, 2002. Friends and family and caregivers cherished the special individual she remained until the end.
Jean BISHOP is Melba's niece.

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McKENNITT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Jack McCLURE
By Carol BERNEY Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page A22
Painter, tennis player, friend, Perth County Conspirator. Born July 26, 1936, in Troy, New York Died February 13 in Stratford, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 66.
Jack McCLURE never made much money. He lived a simple life, say his Friends, who describe him as a "secular monk." After serving in the U.S. Coast Guard in Miami in the early 60s, Jack attended the University of Miami, played tennis, and hung out at The Flick coffee house, where he met actor/musician Cedric SMITH. In the late sixties Jack accompanied Cedric to Canada, and ended up working in the kitchen of the Black Swan coffee house in Stratford and living at "Puddlewalk, " the communal farm home of the Perth County Conspiracy, a swirling, ever-changing family of draft dodgers, artists, actors, musicians, and local hippies.
Jack was a passionate scholar and creative thinker. Obsessed with Marshall McLUHAN, Jack thought he saw a flaw in McLUHAN's theory, and actually went to Toronto to meet McLUHAN. Unfortunately, McLUHAN brushed him off and Jack came home crushed. For a short while, Jack lived at the (in)famous Rochdale College in Toronto. Jack said he lived on the 14th floor, and would look down and see cop cars converging on the building, but the residents had rigged the elevators to run so slowly that there was always plenty of time to clean up before the police arrived, and people rarely got busted. The other people on his floor were very nice, serious artists and intellectuals, but there were some wilder characters on some of the lower floors, and riding the elevator could be quite an adventure.
Back in Stratford, Jack lived in a caboose on a friend's farm for awhile, and then moved into town to share an apartment with another friend, Harry FINLAY. Jack then worked at the Gentle Rain natural foods store for, essentially, the rest of his life. He also sold paintings to his Friends, and gave tennis lessons. Among his patrons and students was musician Loreena McKENNITT, who said Jack was a very good teacher. His paintings were mostly in a realistically impressionist style, with tiny touches of absurdity and/or social protest. He would add a discarded Coke can to an otherwise idyllic river scene, or paint a nuclear-waste hazard sign on the side of a railroad car or at the back of a cave. One of his paintings was a portrait of Albert Einstein, while another, titled Church of the Muses, depicted Einstein playing the violin, with James Joyce playing piano and Bertrand Russell reciting.
In the last few years, Jack became close Friends with Michelle DENNIS, a co-worker at the Gentle Rain. On the back of a painting Jack gave to Michelle's family he called her two young daughters his "surrogate grandchildren."
This past summer, Jack was diagnosed with lung cancer. He underwent chemotherapy and radiation therapy and was in remission when he suffered a fatal heart attack during a badminton game. Jack left instructions to be cremated, with no service. However, as his long-term friend and employer Eric EBERHART remarked, that didn't mean we couldn't have a party. So the Sunday after Jack's death, many of his Friends and co-workers gathered at his house. We brought food, drink, photographs, and his paintings, and we had an impromptu showing of Jack's work to pay homage to his life and his spirit. His paintings are being archived, and in the spring there may be a showing at one of the Stratford galleries.
In Jack's room, on his work bench, was a quotation from Einstein: "The years of anxious searching in the dark, the intense longing, the alternations of confidence and exhaustion and then -- the final emergence into the light -- only someone who has so struggled and endured could understand." This describes the Jack we knew and loved.
Carol BERNEY is a friend of Jack McCLURE.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
R. J. Leland COULTIS
In loving memory of R. J. Leland COULTIS who passed away Saturday morning, May 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Memorial Site at the age of 66 years.
Beloved husband of Gladys (WALLI) COULTIS of Sudbury. Loving father of Richard and Philip both of Copper Cliff and Norma BELANGER of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Kaitlyn and Justin. Dear son of Phillip and Jessie COULTIS predeceased. Dear brother of Laureen BAILEY (husband Arden predeceased) of Sudbury, Loretta PYETTE (husband Eugene) of Tehkummah, Georgina MacKENZIE (husband Jim) of Little Current and George predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
At Leland's request there will be no visitation or service.
Cremation with interment of the cremains in the family plot at Waters Cemetery.
Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Ruby (MOGGY) RUTHENBERG
In loving memory of Ruby (MOGGY) RUTHENBERG, who passed away Thursday, May 29, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital, Saint Joseph Health Centre at the age of 61 years.
Beloved wife of Bernie RUTHENBERG, predeceased 1987. Loving mother of Pam GIBSON and James McKENZIE (wife Diane) both of Sudbury. Cherished grandmother of Shannon, Sheri-Lynn, Clint and Trevor. Sadly missed by brothers, sisters, nieces and nephews. Funeral service was held on Saturday, May 31, 2003 in the Saint Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning. Interment in the Hillygrove Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
McKENZIE
-In loving memory of my dear wife, Irene, who passed away Sept. 8, 1998.
It's been a long time
I have been alone
I sure miss you a lot.
I think of you all the time,
It's so lonesome here
I love you, Dear.
God loves you and I do too.
-Love your husband, Bert.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
COX, Reverend Michael T., S.F.M.
Father Michael COX died peacefully, on April 9, 2003, after a lengthy battle with stomach cancer. He was the son of the late John Thomas COX and Catherine Anne MacKENZIE of Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. Born in Glace Bay, Father COX attended St. Anthony's Elementary and Saint Anne's High School, graduating in 1942. He joined the Scarboro Foreign Mission Society in September 1944 and was ordained to the priesthood in December 1950. He was assigned to mission in Japan in the summer of 1951 and worked there for 50 years, serving in various parishes. He returned to Canada in 2001 to retire. Father COX was the last surviving member of his immediate family. He was predeceased by sisters Elizabeth (who died in infancy,) Mary LAFFIN, and Sister Martha MARY, a member of the Sisters of Charity; and by his brothers Joe, Neil, George, and Father William, also a member of Scarboro Missions. Father Cox is survived by his sister-in-law Mrs. Kathleen COX of Glace Bay with whom he resided since January 2003, by several nieces, nephews, grandnieces, and grandnephews, and by members of his Scarboro Missions community. The Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated Saturday, April 12, at St. Anthony's parish in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. Father Cox will be buried beside his parents at St. Anthony's Parish Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to Scarboro Missions or to a charity of your choice.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Hockey News co-founder had winning formula
By James CHRISTIE Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page S10
Toronto -- No one was going to get rich from The Hockey News, Ken McKENZIE freely admitted. The wealth he shared was in the information it contained for fans and those in the hockey industry.
McKENZIE who died Wednesday at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga, was co-founder 1947 -- along with Will CÔTÉ -- of the publication that came to be known as hockey's Bible. He was 79.
His son, John McKENZIE, said Ken died suddenly when he went into septic shock following surgery for colon cancer.
Ken McKENZIE and CÔTÉ birthed a magazine that was a landmark in the Canadian periodicals industry -- a sport publication that survived when so many failed and folded. It evolved from a house organ for the National Hockey League -- McKENZIE was originally an National Hockey League publicist -- into an encyclopedic, authoritative publication. The content matured from reprints of stories by hockey beat writers in six National Hockey League towns to exclusive columns by The Hockey News's own editors and writers such as Steve DRYDEN and Bob McKENZIE (no relation,) who could challenge the National Hockey League and international hockey establishment. Ken McKENZIE was presented with the Elmer Ferguson Award for his pioneering role on the magazine's 50th anniversary in 1997 and inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.
"He loved hockey and sports of all kinds," said John McKENZIE, a correspondent with American Broadcasting Company News in New York. "He had this idea when he was in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He got up on a table in the mess hall and called his buddies around and said 'If I started a hockey paper, would you guys buy it?'
"They all cheered. He started with only $383 and The Hockey News was born."
Ken McKENZIE cited the figure as precisely $383.81 in a 50th anniversary story in The Globe and Mail. He was famed for keeping a close eye on finances down to the penny.
Along with editing associate Charlie HALPIN, McKENZIE operated the paper on a shoestring with a handful of employees. Newspaper beat writers in each team's city were paid only a few dollars.
"When I paid those guys, it was 10 bucks, later on 50 bucks, whatever, it was the going rate," McKENZIE said. "It was always cheap. You weren't going to get rich in this business.... I'd say to a guy, 'You may be big in Calgary or Edmonton or Vancouver, but if you write for this paper, they'll know you all across Canada.' A lot of guys liked that."
As the National Hockey League's publicity director from the 1940s into the late 1960s, McKENZIE developed press and radio guides and had access to teams' statistics and mailing lists. He and CÔTÉ used those to convince almost 4,000 fans to send in $2 each ($3 in the United States) as advance subscription payments to finance the first issue. The circulation was 20,000 by the end of its first year.
The Hockey News under McKENZIE maintained its comfortable relationship with the National Hockey League. McKENZIE bought out COTE's interest in the mid-1960s, then eventually sold 80 per cent of the magazine to New York's WCC Publishing in 1973 for a reported $4-million and the balance in the 1980s. The headquarters moved from Montreal to Toronto and McKENZIE stayed as publisher intil 1981.
He wanted to continue writing and working, rather than retire, and after leaving the hockey paper, he and HALPIN bought into Ontario Golf News. McKENZIE was still associated with the golf paper at his death, said Ontario Golf advertising executive Ted VANCE.
"I know it was first viewed as a house organ, but go through his stuff in the early years and it wasn't strictly milquetoast, said DRYDEN, The Hockey News editor from 1991 to 2002. "He may have had favourites and protected some people. As National Hockey League publicist, he could not be a vociferous critic. But long before the sale of The Hockey News, it was getting an edge to it. In the end, it was a helluva idea."
Added Bob McKENZIE: " Whatever anyone says, it's a good legacy to have started The Hockey News and to see where it's at today." Parent corporation Tanscontinental Publishing said The Hockey News has a paid circulation of more than 100,000.
Ken McKENZIE is survived by his wife Lorraine of Mississauga, four children -- John McKENZIE and Jane Mckenzie KOPEC of New York, Kim McKENZIE in Oakville, Ontario, and Nancy Mckenzie PONTURO in Redding, Connecticut., -- and five grandchildren. His funeral will be 11 a.m., Monday April 14, at St. Luke's Anglican Church on Dixie Road, Mississauga.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-20 published
CRAWFORD, Margaret (née FREDERICKSON,) B.A. (Tor.,) M.A. (University of British Columbia)
died in Victoria, British Columbia on June 17, 2003 at the age of 78. Long associated in many capacities with the administrative offices of University of British Columbia. Secretary to Walter H. GAGE, who was then Dean of administrative and inter-faculty affairs, 1951-1954; secretary to president, Norman A. M. MacKENZIE, 1954-1962; briefly a programmer in University extension, programs for women and assistant in the office of Helen McCRAE, Dean of women, 1964-1975, with special interest in that office's outstanding contribution to the mature women students who were then arriving at University of British Columbia in increasing numbers and with special needs. Margaret completed a M.A. at University of British Columbia with a research thesis on mature women students in 1976. Married in 1977 to Frank W. CRAWFORD and moved to Edmonton where she continued to be active in women's affairs as a founding member of the Edmonton Women's Network. The CRAWFORD's retired to Victoria in 1982 where Margaret continued her interests in educational resources for mature students and in support systems for women. Margaret is survived by her husband, Frank CRAWFORD; 2 step sons and 2 step daughters and their families. Private cremation entrusted to Royal Oak Crematorium. In lieu of flowers, donations, if so desired, may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or the charity of one's choice. Hayward's of Victoria (250) 386-3505

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
BEST, Winnifred McDonald
Winn BEST died peacefully on June 24, 2003, at the age of 95. Loving mother of Catherine CARTER (Donald) of Kingston and Michael BEST (Patti) of Waterloo. Beloved grandmother of Ian CARTER (Chrissie YAO), Colin CARTER (Toni THORTON), Gillian BEST, David BEST and Kerri BEST and great-grandmother to Nathan CARTER. Loving aunt to Elizabeth McDONALD (Ken WEST) and Anne HILLMER and her children Victoria and Andrew. Special friend to Norbert MacKENZIE. Predeceased by her husband John BEST, her brother Murray McDONALD and her sister-in-law and best friend, Catherine McDONALD. Winn lived for her family and Friends, her warmth and empathy will not be forgotten. A memorial service will be held at the church that she grew up in, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 9860 Keele Street, Maple, Ontario, on Thursday, July 3, 2003 at 1: 30 p.m. Donations in memory of Winn may be made to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 9860 Keele Street, Maple, Ontario L6A 1R6.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Singer was hit on Hit Parade
Canadian-born performer played violin with Jack Benny and posed as wife of Sid Caesar
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
She was called "Canada's First Lady of Song." In the late 1940s, singer Gisele MacKENZIE was so popular on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio that she was known just by her first name.
When she was 23, she headed off to Hollywood, where she became one of the main singers on Your Hit Parade, a popular American network television show in the 1950s. By the time television started in Canada in 1952, she was already a star in the United States, appearing on programs with Jack Benny and later with Sid Caesar, the hottest comedian of his day.
Gisele MacKENZIE, who has died at the age of 76, was not always known by that name. On the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, she was known simply as Gisele, though a 1950 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release did call her by her proper name -- Gisele LAFLECHE. As soon as she moved to CBS in 1951, she adopted the stage name Gisele MacKENZIE. The reason, she told a New York reporter in 1955, was that the name Gisele LAFLECHE "sounded too much like a striptease artist's." The real explanation was an American audience would have trouble with so French a name. It was the television network that ordered the name change.
Marie Marguerite Louise Gisele LAFLECHE was born on January 10, 1927, in Winnipeg. The name MacKENZIE was from her paternal grandmother. Her father, Georges, was a doctor, who played the violin, and her mother, Marietta MANSEAU, was a concert pianist and singer as a young woman. Ms. MacKENZIE started playing the violin seriously when she was 7. She made her first public performance at the Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg at the age of 12.
When she was 14, her family sent her to the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. She studied the violin and the piano, and planned on being a concert violinist. Later in life, a story circulated that she never took voice lessons, but Jim GUTHRO, who was at the conservatory at the same time, remembered a voice teacher who took an interest in her. He also remembered that she attended at the same time as Robert GOULET and they would sing together.
When she first came to Toronto, she stayed at Rosary Hall, a residence for Catholic girls on Bloor Street at the top of Jarvis Street. Tess MALLOY, who was there at the same time, remembered her. "She lived right across the hall from me. She and her girlfriend used to drive us nuts practising the violin."
Ms. MALLOY didn't remember her singing at the residence, but somewhere along the way someone discovered Ms. MacKENZIE could sing. It was close to the end of the war and she started to perform for groups of servicemen. It was then that she was discovered by musician Bob SHUTTLEWORTH, a lieutenant who led a band for the Royal Canadian Navy.
Right after the war, she started singing with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH's band at the Glenmount Hotel on the Lake of Bays, north of Toronto. Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, who later became her manager and her husband, took her to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which then broadcast live popular music over the radio.
"Bob SHUTTLEWORTH called me at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and said, 'Get a studio, a piano and a vocal mike. I have someone I want you to hear,' recalled Jackie RAE, then a music producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, later leader of his own band (and, incidentally, the uncle of former Ontario premier Bob RAE.) "I remember her wonderful voice and how fresh she was. We hired her straight away to do three programs a week."
The program was Meet Gisele, and it ran for 15 minutes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The program started on October 8, 1946, and lasted for four years. She was so popular the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation used her in other programs with names such as The Girl Next Door or The Song Pluggers.
In 1951, Ms. MacKENZIE was spotted by Bing CROSBY's son, and went to work in the United States for Bob CROSBY's Club 15, bumping the Andrews Sisters from their regular slot. The pay was $20,000 (U.S.) a year, worth $150,000 in today's money. She was 23.
The money was something Canada could never match. Mr. GUTHRO, later head of Variety at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, guesses she was making $200 a week for her radio programs.
"Gisele Leaves for Hollywood. Canada's Loss," read a headline in one Toronto paper. The article guessed at the pay package, and it was right.
Ms. MacKENZIE was about to have her best decade ever in show business. After a short stint on Club 15, she worked on the Mario Lanza Show, before landing her full-time job at Your Hit Parade. The idea behind the NBC program was to take the top seven songs on the hit parade that week and have them done by the regular singers in the Your Hit Parade troupe. The half-hour program was a huge success in the United States and in late 1953 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation picked it up for a while.
Ms. MacKENZIE was the only regular singer on the program to have her own hit record, Hard to Get, in 1955.
Though none of her family shared her success, all were musical. There were her parents, both of whom were serious amateur musicians two of her sisters sang and played, and a brother played the cello. Along with Gisele, two of them had what is called perfect pitch.
"It's rare and she had it," Mr. RAE said. "You would play four notes on the piano and she could match them. Perfect pitch isn't always a great thing, but in her case it was."
Ms. MacKENZIE's training as a classical violinist came in handy on the Jack Benny program, on which she first appeared in 1955. The droll comedian always made a thing of how he couldn't play the violin. One vaudeville-type act they would do on his show involved her patiently showing him what to do with a violin after he made some awful screeching noise with his bow.
She was Jack Benny's protégé, and he helped land her own television program in 1958. Called the Gisele MacKENZIE Show, it lasted only six months.
But she remained famous. At one stage, she was the subject of This is Your Life, which involved linking up with old Friends and relatives. She was a regular on game shows that featured minor celebrities, such as Hollywood Squares.
In 1963, she was cast as Sid Caesar's television wife and made regular trips to New York City, where the program was done. Like other television programs of that era, it was live, since videotape was only just being introduced.
Ms. MacKENZIE also acted and sang in live musicals in the United States, things such as Annie Get Your Gun and South Pacific. Over the years, she also worked in Las Vegas, performing in night clubs there. She returned to Canada for the occasional concert and television special, including one on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in late 1960. It was about "her story book career" and included the yarn, always told by her publicists, of how she decided to take up singing after she lost her $3,000 violin.
By the end of the 1960s, the big work started to dry up and Canadian newspapers were running the occasional "Where Are They Now" articles. She was in a sprawling ranch house in suburban Encino, Calif. She also owned property in Palmdale and Marin County, Calif., as well as a house on Lake Manitoba back home.
All that detail came up in a nasty divorce from Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH in 1968. Because he was also her manager, he kept 10 per cent of her gross income for the next three years. She later married a banker, Robert KLEIN, but that also ended in divorce.
During the rest of her career, Ms. MacKENZIE kept working in regional theatre and made guest appearances on television series, including MacGyver and Murder, She Wrote, as well as singing stints on programs such as the Dean Martin Show. She also did television commercials in the United States and Canada.
Ms. MacKENZIE had some odd hobbies. She collected and mixed exotic perfumes and in the 1950s she took up target shooting, becoming an expert shot. She and her first husband had a large collection of pistols, rifles and shotguns. In her later years, like many Hollywood stars, she was involved with Scientology.
Ms. MacKENZIE, who died in Burbank, Calif., on September 5, had two children with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, a son Mac and a daughter Gigi (short for Gisele) DOWNS.

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McKENZIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
McKENZIE, Dorothy Elizabeth Lillian (née LANE)
Devoted wife of the late Wm. Wallace McKENZIE. Born in 1914 in Holland Landing. Daughter of Cuthbert and Emma LANE. Sister of the late Rube OUGH. Died peacefully at home September 22, age 89. She is deeply loved and will be ever remembered by her three daughters Gail, Patsy and Lynne, son-in-law George STEEVES, granddaughter Kerri-Lynn, grand_sons Michael, Andrew and Kyle and her lifes lessons will be lovingly taught to great-grand_son William. We will all miss her. The best mother ever. A mother holds onto her children's hands for a short while and their hearts forever. Friends may call at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Wednesday 5-8 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel Thursday, 1 p.m. Interment York Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or charity of your choice.

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McKESSOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
Marion CHAMBERS
By Rosemary, Colin and Maralee CHAMBERS, Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, grandmother, wife and partner, teacher, friend, community activist. Born July 23, 1928, in Massey, Ontario Died June 22 in Guelph, Ontario, aged 74.
It seemed fitting that Marion CHAMBERS won the 1994 Ontario New Democratic Party's Agnes MacPhail award for pioneering women. Like MacPHAIL, Marion's roots were in Ontario's Grey County. And like MacPHAIL, she lived life with a strong commitment to social justice, equality and activism.
Born in Massey, Ontario, in 1928, Marion McKESSOCK grew up on a farm in the Depression era. As a child she was a strong student with a flair for reading, creative writing and drama. Marion aspired to be a journalist but as there were few women in the profession at that time, her guidance counsellor (later known to Canadians as Olive DIEFENBAKER) steered her toward teaching. It was a good match. As a teacher, parent and friend, Marion had never-ending patience, an enthusiasm for knowledge, a keen analytical mind and an ability to bring out the best in people.
Marion taught in Inglewood, Guelph and Forest Hill while completing her B.A. at Queen's University during the summers. Her first love as a teacher was English literature and drama and she won awards for her student productions. Even after her formal teaching career ended, Marion continued to pursue English and drama on a volunteer basis. She taught English as a second language to two Vietnamese families who settled in the Erin area and wrote and directed an annual Christmas pageant for the children of Friends and neighbours.
Marion met Cecil, her husband of 46 years, when she taught his younger sister.
Along with their children, Rosemary, Colin and Maralee, they settled in Erin Township. Their busy lives were balanced by gorgeous fall colour, serene winter walks, spring carpets of trilliums and summers of gardening.
While at home caring for her young family, Marion became very involved in her community. She served on the boards of her local arts council, library, home and school association, parks and recreation association, United Church and on the Wellington Dufferin Health Council. Marion was elected to Erin Village Council in 1975 and her many contributions to the community were officially recognized when she was awarded Erin's Citizen of the Year Award.
A long-time member and supporter of the New Democratic Party, Marion became increasingly involved in the party in the late 1970s and early 1980s. She managed campaigns, twice sought election to the Ontario Legislature, served on the Ontario New Democratic Party Executive and was party president from 1982-1984.
Marion loved ideas and debate and was well known for putting her beliefs into action. She was often ahead of her time: recycling long before it was common, offering her own home as a "safe house" before such alternatives were available locally, expressing written dissent in 1988 when her United Church Board voted to deny the ordination of gays and lesbians. She encouraged her children in their studies and careers and enjoyed the lively discussions that ensued when five opinionated family members and frequent guests met around the dinner table.
Marion greeted everyone she met with a warm and engaging smile. Family and Friends looked to her for support.
Marion would have been humbled by the dedicated group of caregivers who were by her side as Alzheimer's disease took its toll. Her husband Cecil, her children and grandchildren, extended family and Friends provided exemplary care and support. As one friend noted in a letter to the family, "great love begets great love."
Rosemary, Colin and Maralee are Marion's children.

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McKETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
BARR, The Honourable Mr. Justice John Roderick (Rod), Q.C., L.L.D.
Born in Toronto on September 9, 1921, died in St. Catharines, Ontario May 30, 2003. Devoted and loving husband to the late Rhoda Marshall BARR. Predeceased by infant daughter Jane. Dearly loved by his son Peter, daughter Elizabeth and their spouses, Sharon BRODERICK and Stephen PERRY. Adoring grandfather to John BARR and Nicholas, James and Christopher PERRY. Brother and great friend of his sisters, Margaret RHAMEY and the late Isabelle MARSH. As dear as a brother to sisters-in-law, Helen CAUGHEY and Nellie MARSHALL.
Rod was grateful for a full and happy life. He grew up in Hamilton, Ontario and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outset of World War 2. Rod first served as a Flight Instructor in Trenton, Ontario, where he met his future wife Nursing Sister Rhoda MARSHALL. Obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant, he served in 426 Squadron as a pilot with Bomber Command at Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire.
At the end of the war, Rod studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1948. At that time, he and Rhoda established their home in St. Catharines where he enjoyed many years practicing civil litigation and where as a trial lawyer he earned the respect of his colleagues. Rod served as a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Advocates Society. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario, Trial Division in 1983.
Rod received an Honourary Doctorate of Laws from Brock University. He was an active member of the St. Catharines Flying Club and proud member of the St. Catharines Rowing Club. He took up sculling at the age of 52 and participated in Masters Rowing in Canada and the United States.
He supported a large range of charities. No one less fortunate was ever turned away. Rod's insight and kindness was matched only by his wonderful, inimitable sense of humour. Above all, he loved and was loved by his family.
The family is deeply grateful to Dr. R. MacKETT, Dr. F. MacKAY, Dr. J. WRIGHT, Dr. FERNANDES and Dr. W. GOLDBERG, and to gentle caregivers Virgie PEREZ, Marylou and Risa.
''Pray for me, and I will for thee,
that we may merrily meet in heaven.''
The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Sunday, June 1, from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, June 2, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. A service will also be held in St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Amherst Island, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, at 3 p.m. Interment to follow.
Donations may be made in Rod's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Knox Presbyterian Church.

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