All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"McKI" 2003 Obituary


MCKI  MCKIMMIE  MCKINLEY  MCKINNEY  MCKINNON  MCKISSOCK 

McKI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
William Alton " Bill" LEESON
In loving memory of William Alton "Bill" LEESON who passed away Tuesday morning, October 28, 2003 at his residence in Val Caron at the age of 54 years. Beloved husband of Joyce (BURNETT) LEESON of Val Caron. Loving father of Jennifer (husband Michael THERRIEN) of Hanmer, Rick (wife Nikki) and Craig all of Val Caron. Proud grandfather of Michaela, Crystal, Cody and Keara. Dear son of Loretta (McMULLEN) MacKI of Webbwood and Robert LEESON (predeceased.) Dear brother of Ron LEESON (wife Joan) of Webbwood, Larry LEESON of British Columbia, and Ivan LEESON (predeceased.) Sadly missed by his special canine companion "Nix". Bill enjoyed music, dancing, fishing and hunting and family times. He served as a boy scout and cub leader for over 10 years. Bill retired from INCO in 1998 after 30 years of service as an electrician. He greatly cared for and enjoyed his family, Bill leaves them a wonderful legacy of strength and love and he will remain forever in their hearts.
Funeral service was held at the Lougheed Funeral Home, Val Caron/Blezard Valley Chapel 1815 Main Street, Val Caron on Friday, October 31, 2003. Interment at The Valley East Cemetery.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

MCKI - All Categories in OGSPI

McKIMMIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
STANFIELD, Katherine Margaret (née STAIRS)
Died peacefully December 26, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born February 1, 1918, eldest of Katherine (DRYSDALE) and Cyril W. STAIRS, Halifax, she attended Halifax Ladies College, Edgehill and the Halifax Business College before working at Wm. Stairs son and Morrow. She married Gordon (Pete) STANFIELD in 1940. They resided in Sydney and New Glasgow before settling in Halifax, summering in Bedford and vacationing in Bermuda. Kay will be remembered as a people person who made a life long contribution to her community through her many interests and activities as a member of the Waegwaltic and Saraguay Clubs, the Junior League, All Saints Cathedral, Victoria Hall and the garden club. She is survived by sisters: Phyllis (MacDOUGALL) Toronto, Doshie (MacKIMMIE- KAUMEYER) Calgary, Betty (FREUND) Johannesburg, South Africa and brother Allan STAIRS, Montreal: daughters Nancy and Pegi, Calgary; sons David (Barbara) Halifax and Gordon (Kay), Dartmouth; grand_sons Peter (Karin SORRA), New Jersey, Michael, Vancouver, John (Julie) Calgary, David K and Matthew, Halifax; great grand_son William, New Jersey. She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years (1995) and brother Arthur STAIRS, Halifax. The family is most grateful for the care and support given to Kay by the staff and Friends at Melville Heights, her home since 1995. The family will receive visitors at Snows Funeral Home, Windsor Street, Halifax on Monday December 29 from 7-9: 00 p.m. The funeral service will be at All Saints Cathedral, Tuesday, December 30, 1:30 p.m.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

MCKIMMIE - All Categories in OGSPI

McKINLEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
Mary Elizabeth LANKTREE
Passed away peacefully on Sunday March 9, 2003 at the Salvation Army AR Goudie Eventide Home, Kitchener.
Mary (née MacDONALD) LANKTREE in her 85th year was the beloved wife of the late Harry LANKTREE (February 27, 1999.) Dear mother of Myrna TIDD of BC, Gloria PRIMEAU of Kitchener, June KAWA and her husband Larry of Val Caron, David LANKTREE and his wife Suzanne of Kitchener and Denise GILBERT and her husband Dana of Kitchener. Loving grandmother of twelve grandchildren and great-grandmother of nine. Dear sister of May KINSLEY, Minerva HALL, Annie McKINLEY. Predeceased by one brother Russell MacDONALD.
Mary's family received relatives and Friends on Tuesday March 11 at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener. Funeral service was held on Wednesday March 12, 2003 in the chapel of the funeral home. Spring interment in Civic Cemetery, Sudbury. Visit www.obit411.com/968 for Mary's memorial.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINLEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Margaret "May" KINSLEY
In loving memory of Margaret "Kay" KINSLEY who died at Sudbury Memorial Hospital on Sunday, November 16, 2003 at the age of 87 years.
Former resident of Tehkummah, Orangeville and Sudbury. Born to Alex and Martha McDONALD on September 7, 1916. Predeceased by both husbands Clarence KINSLEY and Archie McLENNAN. Loved by her children, Florence and husband Gilbert PYETTE of Mindemoya, John and wife Jean of Mindemoya, Russell and wife Fern McLENNAN of Bradford, David KINSLEY of Tehkummah. Will be missed by her grandchildren, Rodney, Anita, Frank, Doug, Don, Mark, Dennis, Janice, Patty (Patricia). Predeceased by granddaughter Barb. Great grandmother of ten. Remembered by siblings, "Russell" (William Alexander)(predeceased) and wife
Kathleen McDONALD, Mary and husband Harry LANKTREE (both predeceased,) Minerva HALL
of Orangeville and Annie and husband Arther (predeceased) McKINLEY of Sudbury.
Visitation from 2-4 and 7-9 on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 and Funeral at 11: 00a.m. Thursday, November 20, 2003 all at Tehkummah Pentecostal Church. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Katherine (Kae) PLAUNT
Died peacefully at York Extendicare, Sudbury, on May 9, 2003 in her 90th year, with her children at her side. Cherished daughter of the late Mildred and W.B. PLAUNT. Predeceased by her loving husband, Dr. R. MacKay THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in 1981. Dearly remembered by her children: Andy (Mandy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Toronto, Kathie THOMAS (Richard,) Judy MAKI (Tom) and Robin (Mary Lou McKINLEY) of Sudbury. Adored Nana to Allen DAY (Erin CAMERON), Andy DAY (Carla GIUSTO), Kathy, Jodi, Alex, Nikki, Fraser, Michael, Jamie, Scott and great-grandmother to Alexander. Beloved sister of Marian MAHAFFY (Guy, predeceased,) Bill PLAUNT, predeceased (Agnes,) Helen VOLLANS (Maurice, predeceased,) Donald PLAUNT, predeceased, Royal Canadian Air Force, World War 2 and Jean BENNESS, predeceased (Barry, predeceased.) Loving sister-in-law to George WRIGHT of Hanover, Ruth LAWS of Almonte, Murray THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Ottawa and Muriel VALENTIN of Stuttgart, Germany. Auntie Kae will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews and their families in the PLAUNT and THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON clans.
Born in Renfrew on April 29, 1914, she moved to Sudbury in 1924 where her father established his lumber business. She attended Central Public and Sudbury High School, Branksome Hall and graduated from the School of Nursing, University of Toronto, in 1937. After working in Toronto in public health, she returned to Sudbury the following year where she met and married Mac.
Kae loved to golf and curl, and took an avid interest in her family's history. She was very talented in the traditional arts, enjoying knitting, quilting and cooking. As an active community volunteer, she belonged to the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire where she was Regent and to the Salvation Army as an organizer for the annual fund raising drive and board member. She loved to travel with her husband and Friends, but her favourite place in the world was Lake Pogamasing where her parents established a family camp in 1941 and where she spent every summer with her family. She loved to entertain her Friends and her children's Friends, especially at Pog. We were blessed to have a mother and grandmother who stressed the importance of family, community and responsibility. She loved to bring people together and do things for them, to share her interests and her talents, she was kind and considerate to all she met, and along with Dad taught us how to dance and have fun.
Special thanks from the family to Dr. Reg KUSNIERCZYK and his staff, the Walford staff and Dr. ROCH and staff on the fifth floor of York Extendicare for their devoted and caring attention to Mother.
In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to Young Men's Christian Association Sudbury.
Memorial service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Tuesday, May 13th, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation followed by interment at Lake Pogamasing. Friends may call 6-9 p.m. Monday, or gather in the chapel after 11 a.m. Tuesday.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

MCKINLEY - All Categories in OGSPI

McKINNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Died This Day -- Louise McKINNEY, 1931
Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page R9
Teacher, feminist and politician born Louise CRUMMY at Frankville, Ontario, on Sept 22, 1868; 1903, left teaching to become western organizer of Woman's Christian Temperance Union; served 20 years as president; 1917, elected to Alberta Legislature as first female legislator in British Empire; 1919, became one of Famous Five in "Persons Case," whose appeal to Privy Council won women the right to sit in the Canadian Senate; died in Claresholm, Alberta.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

MCKINNEY - All Categories in OGSPI

McKINNON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
James Athey BECKETT
At Chelsey Park Nursing Home, London on Sunday, January 19, 2003 James Athey Beckett of London, formerly of Kitchener and born in Sunrise Kentucky, in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Ruth (MILLSON) BECKETT. Dear father of Ruth Ann BASTERT and Nancy BELL of Sheguiandah, Manitoulin Island, Mary Lou BECKETT and Chuck EBERLEY of Ottawa, Sandy Lee BECKETT of London. Dear grandfather of Peggy, Shawn, Ian and Wendy, Matthew and Aaron. Also survived by nine great-grandchildren. Predeceased by brothers John and Bud and a sister Suzanna. Friends called at the C. Haskett and son Funeral Home, 223 Main Street, Lucan on Monday, January 20 where the funeral service was held on Tuesday, January 21 with Reverend Fred McKINNON officiating. Cremation with interment St. James Cemetery, Clandeboye. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINNON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Reverend Jackson W. STRAPP
In loving memory of Jackson STRAPP who passed away at the Sault Area Hospital on Saturday, July 19, 2003 at the age of 77 years. Beloved husband of Marion (WEDGE) and father of their four sons Bruce, Bryan, David and Craig. Loving son of the Reverend Howard and Mrs. Fannie STRAPP. Dear brother of Keith (predeceased) and sister-in-law Carolyn (McKINNON.) Friends and family joined in the memorial service at Sault Sainte Marie on July 23 with the Reverend Phil MILLER officiating.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINNON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
Don MacKINNON
By Bill HALEWOOD, Bill HARRIS Tuesday, February 11, 2003, Page A20
Husband, father, businessman, veteran. Born April 7, 1925, in Longueuil, Quebec Died April 16, 2002, in Kingston, following surgery, aged 77.
'You're not 18."
"Are you calling me a liar?"
Don enlisted when he was 16. Any kid who could contradict an enlisting officer must have had that certain bravado the army was looking for.
He grew up in St. Lambert, Quebec, across the river from Montreal. As a young boy, before the St. Lawrence Seaway was built, the river was his life. Riding the ice flows was a dangerous sport. He was very athletic, excelling in swimming, hockey, football and skiing.
The war broke out and his brother enlisted. Don was bored so he did, too. He had just finished Grade 9.
He did his basic training at Trois-Rivières then volunteered to join a new elite unit to train as a commando. This combined force of Canadian and American soldiers was to form the First Special Services Force, later called The Black Devils Brigade.
Don went with the brigade to the Aleutians to chase out any remaining Japanese forces, then back to the United States and on to Sicily and Italy via North Africa.
The unit was under the overall command of General Mark CLARK and the immediate goal was the capture of Monte Cassino. Their first battles were to take Monte La Defensa and then Monte Majo in February, 1943, in order to block the German supply line to Cassino. Here Don was wounded -- his foot was blown off. It took two platoon members 12 hours to carry him on a stretcher to a field hospital. The stretcher was dropped every time they came under fire. Don was in poor shape, having lost a lot of blood, and remembers the padre reciting the 23rd Psalm over him.
He was in hospital in Italy for more than a year, then back in hospital in England in June, 1944, and home to Canada by August, 1945. Canadian doctors saw the need for further amputation.
He was now 19 and his father said to him, "What are you going to do with your life? You have no education and you can't dig ditches." Don went back to finish high school and then to McGill to obtain a B.A. under a program sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs. At McGill, he met his wife Heather; they later had two daughters, Beth and Janet.
Don had a business career in advertising, communications, and public relations which took him to Montreal and England.
With his artificial leg, he learned to ski again, and was better on one leg than many a skier on two. He was the second Canadian amputee to ski with specially built equipment. He was physically imposing in a handsome, broad-shouldered, athletic way that seemed to suppress the difficulty of getting through life on one leg. He was a model of courage and prowess in life and work and sport. He played a very good game of golf. Don's spirit was exemplary and his sense of humour allowed him to laugh when he fell in a sand trap; others would have expressed the miseries of frustration. His was a noble equanimity with iron discipline behind it.
On his retirement, Friends encouraged Don and Heather to move to Port Hope, Ontario, where they had some of the happiest years of their life together. He was a generous and sincere friend who generated respect and admiration. He was also a passionate Canadian who stayed politically engaged and applied his liberal perspective to public events inside and outside Canada. His day was made when he, along with his Friends, erected a flag pole on his front lawn.
Don's was an active life in business; in retirement he volunteered with the Navy League Sea Cadets. After he died, his artificial leg was sent to Honduras.
Bill HALEWOOD and Bill HARRIS are Friends of Don.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINNON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
PETROWSKI, Mary Anne (KENT)
At London Health Sciences Centre, Westminster Campus on Thursday, March 6, 2003 in her 73rd year. Only daughter of the late Marion (FAUNT) and Gordon KENT. She leaves behind her dearest friend and loving husband Victor. She is survived by her two cherished daughters Suzanne LEWIS of West Vancouver and Lauren TEEVAN of Toronto, their husbands Richard and Nicholas, and two darling granddaughters Jordan and Kendall LEWIS. Mary Anne was predeceased by her son G.W. Kent PETROWSKI and now goes happily to meet him with open arms. She was born and lived her entire life in London and was a third generation of the West-Kent family, business people in London from 1888-1980. She will be fondly remembered by many beloved relatives and Friends made throughout her life. She was very interested in the work of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire and May Court clubs and was a life member of Metropolitan United Church. Mary Anne had a deep love of music for pleasure, and hopefully will leave a song in the hearts of all who knew her and whom she loved.
Friends may call on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, Richmond St. at St. James, London, Ontario. A memorial service will be conducted on Monday, March 10 at 12: 00 Noon in Metropolitan United Church, Dufferin Ave. at Wellington Street, London, Ontario, by Reverend Farquhar MacKINNON. A private cremation service will be held followed by burial in Woodland Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Children's Hospital Foundation (for Medical Genetics Research) or the London Regional Cancer Centre would be gratefully acknowledged.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINNON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-16 published
CAMPBELL, William Logan 'Bill'
Died April 9, 2003, in Camp Hill Veterans' Memorial Building, Halifax, at the age of 83. Survived by his wife Enid (BOWEN,) daughter Leslie MacKINNON, grand_son Beau (Michelle,) great-grand_son Alexander, daughter-in-law Lynn and grand_son Aaron; predeceased by son Bob in 1974. Bill joined the Canadian Army in 1939. After retiring in 1969 with the rank of lieutenant colonel, he was active in municipal and provincial politics. A memorial service will be held at a later date in Saint John's Anglican Church, York Mills, Ontario.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

McKINNON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

MCKINNON - All Categories in OGSPI

McKISSOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
Sylvia Mary KISSOCK
By Conrad ALEXANDROWICZ Thursday, April 17, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, friend, meteorologist. Born January 9, 1919, in London, England. Died July 13, 2002, in Victoria, British Columbia, of heart failure, aged 83.
My mother was the first child born to William Henry KISSOCK and Catherine IRENE, née SHARPE. Her father was a wacky Scot, originally named MacKISSOCK, who worked as a marine engineer. Her mother came from a large family whose parents were wealthy brewers. When my mother was 5, the family moved to Australia, near Adelaide. Here she spent some of the happiest years of her life, excelling at dancing and acrobatics, and spending much time on the beach with many Friends.
Then the Depression hit and my grandfather lost his job. They returned to cold, grey, out-of-work England, and the family, like many others, had a very hard go of things. (By this time sister Marian, nine years Sylvia's junior, had joined the family.)
My mother took after her father: she seems to have inherited his irreverent sense of humour, native optimism, great generosity, love of adventure, and talent for dancing. She had always wanted to be a performer, but her mother vetoed that idea, and insisted that Sylvia take secretarial courses at Pitman's College; my mother became a first-rate secretary and administrator.
During the Second World War, Sylvia joined the Women's Auxiliary Air Force and worked as a meteorologist. She met my Polish father, Adam ALEXANDROWICZ, in London after the war. He swept her off her feet with his dashing good looks and continental manners. The couple emigrated to Canada, eventually settling in Ottawa, where he worked for the federal government. Because of her asthma, Ottawa winters were a great trial for her. They had three sons: older brother Stefan, myself, and Adam junior.
Life with my father was mostly very hard; he suffered from bipolar disorder, and he never really recovered from the Second World War. In 1975, she left him, taking most of the furniture with her: she had paid for it out of her meagre salary.
When she retired in 1984, she moved to Victoria, a city where she had only one old friend. But moving there was an adventure that she undertook with anticipation and pleasure.
She enjoyed keenly her retirement there. She loved the swarms of robins in February, the stunning rhododendrons, the cherry blossoms, and the daffodils. But heart disease (she'd had a heart attack back in Ottawa in 1975) was stalking her relentlessly. Despite her devotion to health food, the right fats, a positive attitude, and lots of exercise, the effects of arteriosclerosis continued to accumulate.
My mother suffered much from various ailments of the physical body, but she never let them get her down. She had very few material or financial resources and never met another man after leaving my father, but she never lapsed into bitterness or self-pity. She made the most of life with her energy, enthusiasm, a great sense of humour, and passion for the causes of feminism and environmental activism.
Mum must have had an extra portion of luck from somewhere, since she survived so many health crises. But in the last few months she took what she herself recognized as the last turn with the onset of congestive heart failure. Always independent, she had no wish to languish at home or to be parked in a long-term care facility. So, sometime during her afternoon nap, she just left. She used to say to me, "You know, I always wanted to go out with a massive heart attack, not slowly fall apart." It seems she got what she wanted.
If anything can be said to exemplify my mother's life, it's the concept of triumph over adversity. She had a hard life, but she lived well. Sylvia was a woman of great integrity and principle a dedicated mother and a loyal friend.
Conrad ALEXANDROWICZ is Sylvia's son.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McK... Names     McKI... Names     Welcome Home

MCKISSOCK - All Categories in OGSPI