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"ZI" 2003 Obituary


ZIEGLER 
ZILBERBERG 
ZIMMERMAN 
ZINGG 

ZIEGLER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY
In loving memory of Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY, May 7, 1920 to August 13, 2003.
Beloved wife of George Bruce TOOLEY of Steinbach Manitoba. Loving mother of Brucette WATERSON (Doug), Theodore (Betty), Juanita BROWN (Buster), Andre (Gail). Predeceased by sons Douglas and James. Loving grandmother of Crystal (Mark), Michael (Nancy), Jennifer (Paul), Jason, Sonny, Evelyn (Corey), Justin (Brandy), Jesse (Crystal), Lynette, Shawee, Teri, predeceased by Sean (Brucette), Bruce (Andre). Great Grandmother of Fern, Miah, Natashia, Alexandra, Brooklyn, Riley, Cameron, Tristen and Trinity. Sister of Rose (Harold) DOOLEY and Geraldine (Carl) ZIEGLER of Little Current, Oscar McGREGOR, Godfrey (Ann) and Jean-Mary Jane (Lawrence) ANDREWS of Birch Island. Predeceased by parents Dave and Louise McGREGOR, Theresa, Blanche, Theodore, Gordon (Rebecca), and Evelyn. Sister-in-law of Roy (Bernice), Jim (Betty), Fred (Dianne) and Velma (predeceased). Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Sunday, August 17, 2003 at the Birch Island Community Centre. Funeral service was held on August 19, 2003 at St. Gabriel Lalement Roman Catholic Church. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery, Birch Island, Ontario. Reverend Michael STOGRE officiating.

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ZILBERBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-07 published
Michael EDELSTEIN
By Leah KESHET Friday, February 7, 2003, Page A20
Mathematician, husband, father, grandfather. Born March 21, 1917, in Mlawa, Poland. Died January 27 in Vancouver, British Columbia, of natural causes, aged 85.
Michael EDELSTEIN was born to a respected, well-to-do, traditional Jewish family: His grandfather, Zisha ZILBERBERG, owned a large brick tenement building and a grocery store; his father, Baruch, prospered in the leather trade.
As a young child, Michael received a Jewish education. During his impressionable teen years, Michael discovered a copy of Darwin's Origin of Species abandoned in his grandfather's attic by a fleeing soldier. The discovery led him toward a life of science, and away from religion. As an adolescent, he excelled in mathematics and physics. He was an avid reader, astute in current events, and a scholar of history, who retained detailed knowledge of turbulent events of the two centuries spanned by his life.
Rising anti-Semitism in Poland of the 1920s and 1930s blocked higher education for Jews (via "Numerus Clausus" -- the quota system). His sister Sarenka persuaded Michael to study abroad at the fledgling Hebrew University of Jerusalem (in then-Palestine). He arrived alone in that bewildering land in 1937. There he struggled with the language and culture, and was beset by loneliness and homesickness. Ultimately, this dislocation spared his life. The firestorm that erupted over Europe in 1939 was to consume his family in the Holocaust.
On the Mt. Scopus campus of Hebrew U., conditions were rough, stipends meagre, and hunger and deprivation were rampant. War interrupted his studies: With the onset of the Second World War, Michael enlisted in the British Army, serving in Italy and Egypt. He later fought in the Israeli War of Independence in 1948, and participated in defense research.
The 1950s were years of happiness and rejuvenation. He was reunited, in Israel, with his sister, the single family member who had survived Auschwitz. In 1951, Michael married a warm, caring, beautiful native bride, Tikvah SEGAL; two years later, their only daughter was born. The couple struggled to make ends meet while completing higher degrees, Michael a mathematics D.Sc and Tikvah a botany Ph.D.
In 1962, the family undertook a journey, through Ithaca, New York, and Michigan, which eventually led them, in 1964, to a new home in Canada. Michael was recruited as a mathematics professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, where he became a founder of the mathematics graduate and research program. He inspired colleagues, trained students, carried out research, and taught there for more than two decades before his retirement and relocation to British Columbia.
Michael saw his own life as a series of personal losses: of his beloved mother Ester-Leah (when he was 6), of his young wife (at age 51), his sister in later life, and many others. By age 85, he had outlived an entire generation of kin. He struggled with internal demons in personal interactions, often leaving Friends and loved ones grieving over sudden, inexplicable estrangements. A miraculous reunion in recent years, with his once-estranged daughter who had followed his footsteps to become a mathematician, led to a close bond. It remained unbroken until his dying day, January 27, 2003, in Vancouver.
Michael was an exceptional chess player (gaining the title of International Master in Correspondence Chess in the 1990s), but mathematics was his first love and lifelong passion; he never tired of transmitting that passion to students and even to casual acquaintances. While infirm with Parkinson's disease at an advanced age, he took pleasure in his mathematics books, and braved some of the most notoriously challenging problems in mathematics.
Leah KESHET is Michael's daughter.

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ZIMMERMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-14 published
Audrey ZIMMERMAN
Friday, February 14, 2003, Page A22
Wife, mother, civil servant, scuba diver. Born January 14, 1921, in Halifax. Died December 7, 2002, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged Audrey ZIMMERMAN (née TOBIN) had God on her side. By all accounts, it was a good deal for both of them. Audrey got the impenetrable protection of her faith. God got a follower of infinite optimism and deepest commitment.
She was often bothered by the sex and violence in movies and on television -- so much so that I never knew her to even watch a newscast. Audrey's oldest and dearest friend, retired University of Toronto professor Margaret DOOLAN, says she'd take special care when picking movies to attend with Audrey. It was just part of the protective filter that people felt they needed to build around her.
Audrey was the second youngest in a family of seven children and, from her earliest days, she radiated an innocence that made people want to help and protect her. She rarely needed the assistance but, because it seemed to make others happy, she accepted it with grace and genuine appreciation. Throughout her life, she maintained an innocent enthusiasm that ran to the naive. How much of that naiveté was real and how much she put on for her own convenience, we never figured out. In some 70 years of Friendship, Marg DOOLAN can only recall once when Audrey seemed mad at someone and then because that person had been rude to her husband.
Audrey left Halifax in the late 1950s. She was working in the insurance industry and her boss was transferred to Toronto. He asked her to come along. Shortly after arriving in Toronto, Audrey met an active and outgoing man. Matthew ZIMMERMAN was a widower with three children. Audrey and Matt were married in the spring of 1959. The marriage sent a wave of concern through her family. How would little Audrey manage with a new husband and the instant pressure of three kids ranging in age from 3 to 15? Very well, as it turned out, and in January, 1960, Audrey and Matt added a new son, David.
The pregnancy was troubling. Audrey was diagnosed with severe diabetes in her 20s and pregnancy, especially at that time and at her age (then 39) was considered very risky; something that Audrey would have never even considered.
Diabetes dogged Audrey throughout her adult life and there were many scary incidents of adverse insulin reactions. More than once, some member of the family would arrive home to find Audrey unconscious on the floor, with no idea how long she'd been there the ambulance would be called and revival procedures started. At the end of it all, Audrey's standard response was "It's okay. I'm fine."
There were emotional challenges too. Audrey outlived all but one of her siblings. In 1972, her husband, Matthew, died of cancer. A few years later, she lost a granddaughter to leukemia and, in 1997, her step-daughter, Darlene, also died.
Audrey was small but strong. She never let her diabetes or her age interfere with her ambitions. After Matt died, she went back to work and was with the Ontario Ministry of Health until she retired in the late 1980s. Audrey was an avid tennis player and downhill skier. At the age of 60, she took up scuba diving. That led to another close call. Once, while diving at Tobermory, Ontario, Audrey ran out of air. She was able to signal her diving buddy but he was so much larger than she was, she couldn't share his regulator. Fortunately, their emergency ascent worked and Audrey continued to dive for several more years. About the only ambition she didn't fulfill was skydiving.
Audrey placed her life in God's hands and that was all the protection she needed. Her son, David, often said his mother didn't have a guardian angel, she had a team of them. And they took their job very seriously.
Kent is a friend of Audrey's son, David.

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ZIMMERMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DOE, Joyce Alene
Peacefully at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Science Centre on Friday, February 21, 2003, with her family at her side. Joyce, dear mother of Linda, Peggy, Gail (Peter FORLER) and Douglas (Susan). Loving Nana of Hilary and Willa ZIMMERMAN; Rebecca, Jillian and Rachel FORLER; and, Naomi and Tevis DOE. She is survived by her brother Barry McWATERS of California. A service of remembrance will be held on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 at 2 o'clock at the Armour Heights Presbyterian Church, 105 Wilson Avenue, If desired, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1, would be appreciated.

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ZIMMERMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
SONE, Maurice
Peacefully, on Thursday, March 6, 2003, in his 95th year. Beloved husband of the late Sonya SONE. Loving father of Luby CARR and Ian and Laurie SONE. He will be deeply missed by his treasured grandchildren Matthew and Paul CARR and Judith, Eli, Abigail, David, and Jacob SONE. Survived by his loving sister Min SHANKMAN, sisters and brothers-in-law Dora SENELNICK, Eva SCHOLNICK, Frida JOLSON, David ZIMMERMAN and Willie ZIMMERMAN, and his nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral will be held at Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Yonge and Bathurst) on Friday, March 7, 2003 at 1 p.m. Interment at Mount Sinai Cemetery, Beth Shalom Section. Memorial donations to the Baycrest Centre, (416) 785-2875, would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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ZIMMERMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Died This Day -- Samuel ZIMMERMAN, 1857
Friday, March 14, 2003 - Page R13
Businessman born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania., in 1819; as a young man, moved to Upper Canada to seek his fortune; financed building of Great Western Railway from Toronto and Hamilton; died with 78 passengers and locomotive crew when Burlington Heights bridge collapsed and train fell 12 metres to the frozen Desjardins Canal.

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ZINGG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Visionary performer waged war on trivial art
Her trademark was a experimental process that embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask
By Paula CITRON Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page R13
Canada has lost a powerful force in experimental theatre and dance. Director, dancer, actor, writer and choreographer Elizabeth SZATHMARY died last month in Toronto.
While she will be remembered as a dynamic figure, her artistic life will remain a contradiction. At the beginning of her career, Ms. SZATHMARY was one of the gilded darlings of Toronto's burgeoning experimental theatre. At the end, she was seen by some as a marginalized, religious eccentric who put on plays in church basements.
To her long-time Friends and loyalists, however, Ms. SZATHMARY's life was a spiritual journey in which art, religion and morality were inextricably intertwined in a nobility of purpose.
Ms. SZATHMARY was born in New York on October 12, 1937, to Jewish-Hungarian parents. Her mother was an unhappy former opera singer and vaudeville performer and her father was a composer and arranger who wrote the theme for the popular television show Get Smart and who abandoned his family. Ms. SZATHMARY attended New York's High School of Performing Arts and later performed with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet under choreographer Antony TUDOR.
A ravishing beauty with masses of long, jet-black curls and compelling light-coloured eyes, Ms. SZATHMARY attracted followers throughout her career. She was, says Toronto choreographer David EARLE, a powerful, mysterious presence and a charismatic performer.
Another admirer was Canadian Robert SWERDLOW. Mr. TUDOR's piano accompanist, he fell in love with the beautiful young dancer and followed her to France where Ms. SZATHMARY danced with such companies as Les Ballets Classique de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets Contemporains de Paris. He was the first of many artists to be inspired by Ms. SZATHMARY.
"Elizabeth was a theatre philosopher who wanted to save the world through the beauty and truth of her art," Mr. SWERDLOW said.
The couple relocated to Montreal in the mid-sixties where Mr. SWERDLOW got a job with the National Film Board. One assignment brought him to Toronto, and it was Ms. SZATHMARY who persuaded him to settle there because of the city's "happening" dance scene. Performing under the name Elizabeth SWERDLOW, she first worked with Mr. EARLE and the future co-founders of Toronto Dance Theatre.
In 1969, Mr. SWERDLOW took an unexpected windfall of $30,000 and built his wife a performing venue of her own. In this way, Global Village Theatre emerged from a former Royal Canadian Mounted Police stable and the couple went on to became synonymous with a new wave of provocative, political, issue-oriented theatre.
Mr. SWERDLOW provided the words and music, and co-wrote the shows Elizabeth co-wrote, choreographed, directed and was the featured performer. Importantly, she was the visionary who came up with original concepts and her trademark, multidisciplinary theatrical process embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask.
Among their better-known collaborations was Blue.S.A., an indictment of the "American empire," and Justine, the story of a young girl who gains wisdom through the vicissitudes of life. A huge hit, Justine went to New York where it won off-Broadway awards and enjoyed a long run.
Its success meant Global Village became a stopping place for others. Gilda RADNER, John CANDY and Salome BEY represented just some of the talent that passed through. Later, when Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage Theatre, she helped propel the early careers of Antoni CIMOLINO and Donald CARRIER of the Stratford Festival, Jeannette ZINGG and Marshall PYNKOSKI of Opera Atelier and Native American performer Raoul TRUJILLO.
In the mid-seventies, Ms. SZATHMARY experienced a religious conversion and became a devout Christian.
For Mr. SWERDLOW, it was the last straw in an already turbulent relationship. After the couple split up, Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage, a name that expressed her desire to produce art that would transform and heal through spirituality. To better strike out on her own, she also shed the SWERDLOW name. Until the 1990s, the main work of Inner Stage was a series of acclaimed morality tales -- or modern fables as Ms. SZATHMARY called them which toured schools from coast to coast. She also explored the storytelling power of Native American myths and turned to such themes as the plight of street youth or to the Holocaust from a teenager's point of view. Her final project, No Fixed Address, attempted to air the true voice of the homeless by both telling their stories and casting them as actors.
By all accounts, Ms. SZATHMARY was a true eccentric who personalized everything. Her computer, for example, was called Daisy. Her home was a living museum dominated by a family of cats who occupied their own stools at the dining table, held conversations and sent out Christmas cards to the pets of Friends. Spiritual sayings, religious art and theatre memorabilia covered every scrap of wall and floor space. On an even more personal level, Ms. SZATHMARY kept a journal of religious visions and dreams written in ornate calligraphy and illustrated in Hungarian folk-style art. What is more, she described ecstatic events and augurisms, including a personal affinity with bison, as if such occurrences were as routine as the weather.
In her work, Ms. SZATHMARY demanded perfection, which meant she often proved impossible to work alongside. Friends and colleagues Robert MASON, Julia AMES and Peter GUGELER all talk about Ms. SZATHMARY's middle-of-the-night phone calls -- and the fact that she brooked no criticism or contrary opinions. All the same, their devotion never lessened.
"She was a queen and we were her subjects," said Mr. GUGELER. "Elizabeth never left you once she got ahold of you."
Guerrilla theatre, grass-roots theatre, shoe-string theatre, theatre against all odds, a "let's-make-a-show" mentality -- that was the brave, artistic world in which Ms. SZATHMARY waged her war against what she saw as frivolous or commercial art. In 1989, Inner Stage lost its operating grant and from that time on she financed her own productions. During the last year that she was able to work, she earned a pitiful $5,000.
Ms. SZATHMARY continued to perform in all her productions, turning more to straight acting as her dancing powers declined. Even so, she never gave up the stage to anyone.
Elizabeth SZATHMARY died of rectal cancer in Toronto on March 28. A memorial service will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W., Toronto, at 3 p.m. on April 27.

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