ENGLANDER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-15 published
ENGLANDER, Eva (née BREWAY)
Welcomed home, into the presence of her Lord and Saviour, on Sunday, November 13th, 2005, at the Caressant Care, Courtland, Eva ENGLANDER, formerly of R.R.#2 Tillsonburg, in her 98th year. Born in Csatalja, Hungary, April 25, 1908, daughter of the late Andreas BREWAY and the late former Maria AMANN (both of Hungary.) Predeceased by her late husband Franz ENGLANDER (1945.) Loved mother of Andreas ("Andy") ENGLANDER and his wife Margaret of R.R.#2 Tillsonburg. Proud Oma of three grand_sons: Frank ENGLANDER and his wife Katherine of Arizona, U.S.A.; Steven ENGLANDER and his wife Wendy of London; Michael ENGLANDER of Tillsonburg and six great-grandchildren: Karrie, Nathan and Brianne; Angela, Andrew, Kaitlin. Survived by nieces, nephews and cousins. Predeceased by two sisters and five brothers: John, Andreas, Elizabeth, Konrad, Adam, Martin, Apolonia. Relatives and Friends are welcome to meet with the ENGLANDER family on Thursday evening at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg from 7 to 9 p.m. and Friday 12 noon to 2 p.m. Evening Prayer Service Thursday at 7: 30 p.m. Funeral Service to be conducted on Friday afternoon at 2 p.m. in the Verhoeve Funeral Home Chapel by Reverend Ronald MOHR of the St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Tillsonburg. Interment will follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations (payable by cheque) to the "St. Luke's Lutheran Church" or the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family and can be arranged through the Verhoeve Funeral Home, Tillsonburg (842-4238).

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ENGLANDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-22 published
Donald LAITIN, Quaker Elder 1927-2004
He travelled the world with a message of peace
By Carol COOPER, Special to The Globe and Mail, Saturday, January 22, 2005 - Page S7
Aurora, Ontario -- As a Quaker, Donald LAITIN believed in peace. Once, as a member of a delegation of interfaith peace-builders to Jordan, Israel and Palestine, he presented Yasser Arafat's chief of staff with a copy of the painting The Peaceable Kingdom.
The work by the 19th-century Quaker artist Edward Hicks depicts Isaiah's prophesy of a harmonious world, represented by wild animals lying beside domestic ones. For Mr. LAITIN, the painting represented his fervent desire for world peace.
"He just identified with that picture very, very strongly," said Barbara HORVATH, a member of the Religious Society of Friends, also known as Quakers. "I think he felt it encapsulated the work that he wanted to do in the world. Donald just saw himself as being, or wanting to be, a force for peacefulness and helping reconcile differing people and differing views, as well as diminishing violence."
About 1,200 are active in the Canadian Quaker community, forming in local groups called monthly meetings. Like Mrs. HORVATH, Mr. LAITIN was a long-time member of historic Yonge Street Monthly Meeting in Newmarket, Ontario
Not only did Mr. LAITIN give Mr. Arafat's chief of staff a copy of The Peaceable Kingdom, but also those he met while on international volunteer missions and locally while making interfaith visitations. Mr. LAITIN hoped, as he described it, to "cross barriers" and bring about "unity through diversity." The visits began from his desire to end anti-Semitism and became one that wished to diminish differences between all faiths.
Still, he held the utmost respect for the beliefs of those he visited and had no desire to change them. One such occasion occurred several years ago when he showed up at the Solel Synagogue in Mississauga, Ontario He attended services and developed a Friendship with rabbi Lawrence ENGLANDER. "He was just the gentlest person you would ever want to meet," Rabbi ENGLANDER said. "You would see his face, very peaceful, beaming, friendly, certainly an inviting expression."
Quakers worship without appointed clergy, sitting in silence unless someone is led to speak. During meetings, Mr. LAITIN often spoke passionately about his hope for peace in the Middle East. Afterward, he greeted others with a warm, engulfing handshake and "Hello friend."
Born on Long Island, New York Mr. LAITIN was one of two children born to a Jewish couple, a dentist and a lawyer. When Mr. LAITIN was young, his mother adopted Quakerism and sent him to Quaker schools.
At 18, in 1945, and a student at the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University, Mr. LAITIN was drafted. Wrestling with his pacifist faith, Mr. LAITIN chose to serve in the army as a non-combatant, upsetting his mother and many of his Quaker Friends.
Returning to Cornell, he graduated and found a job with a food-processing companies, signing crop contracts with farmers and advising them when to plant. While on the job in rural Illinois, he fell in love with Barbara CRAWFORD, a farmer's daughter. They married in 1954. Mr. LAITIN later found a job with Continental Can and, in 1958, the company decided to move him to Toronto. Mr. LAITIN remained there until his retirement, becoming the director of research.
During the 1960s, he joined Yonge Street Monthly Meeting. He served on many committees and as its clerk during the '70s. According to Quaker practice, clerks, aided by spiritual guidance, facilitate meetings. While clerk, Mr. LAITIN oversaw refurbishment of the Yonge Street Meeting House, a structure built in 1912 by American Quakers.
Mr. LAITIN also served as clerk of Canadian Yearly Meeting, the national body of the Society of Friends. In 1986, he was one of 17 Canadian church leaders who condemned president Ronald Reagan's bid for congressional aid to the contras in Nicaragua. Mr. LAITIN also participated in many humanitarian initiatives. He spent two weeks volunteering in a hospital in the troubled Chiapas state of Mexico, rolling bandages and sorting clothes. In 1988, Mr. LAITIN was part of a delegation that took food and medical supplies to El Salvador.
Closer to home, Mr. LAITIN established the Orangeville Worship Group and served as a lay chaplain to the area's hospital. He and his wife supported a family claiming refugee status, obtaining their release from detention.
During the winter of 2003, with war in Iraq dominating the news, Mr. LAITIN organized several peace vigils in front of the Orangeville Town Hall, sometimes marching alone. Perhaps he was acting on words he had previously spoken during a meeting: "Tyranny thrives on the silence of good people."
Donald Robert LAITIN was born on July 3, 1927, on Long Island, New York He died at home in Mono Township, Ontario, on December 10, 2004, at 77. He leaves his wife, Barbara, children Ann, John and Suzanne, and sister Tobey Register.

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ENGLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-24 published
Harry J. BOYLE, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Broadcaster: Farmer's son from southwestern Ontario shook the soil off his feet to become a radio and television pioneer who shaped Canada's air waves, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, With files from Canadian Press, Monday, January 24, 2005 - Page S6
Broadcaster, playwright, novelist, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation executive and a former Chair of the Canadian and Radio Television Commission, Harry J. BOYLE was a huge influence on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio and television as a programmer, talent spotter (think Wayne and Shuster), broadcast boss and policy maker.
"He helped the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation become the link that held the country together," said novelist and radio producer Howard ENGEL. "The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, in my time [the 1950s-1970s] was like the railway a century earlier. It let people in Corner Brook know what was going on in Edmonton. He was very important that way in his writing and in his broadcasting."
Harry BOYLE was born on a farm in 1915 in southwestern Ontario. After graduating from Wingham High School and St. Jerome's College (now part of the University of Waterloo) he worked as a journalist for the Goderich Signal Star and a stringer for the London Free Press and the Globe and Mail.
He got his first job as a broadcaster in 1936 at Radio Station CKNX in Wingham, Ontario, the town later made famous as the birthplace and literary home of short-story writer Alice MUNRO. He left the radio station in 1941 and worked for a year at the Stratford Beacon-Herald before joining the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a farm commentator in 1942. He quickly rose to become a network supervisor of features and director of the National Farm Radio Forum.
"He literally had an understanding of broadcasting and life from the grass roots up because he was a farmer," said playwright and Toronto cultural maven Mavor MOORE who was a colleague at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio as far back as the 1940s. There were two Canadian programs that were way ahead of every other in the world in terms of the size of their collective audience audiences that would gather in halls and meeting places across the country to listen to radio, according to Mr. MOORE. One of them was the Citizen's Forum and the other was the Farm Forum under Mr. BOYLE's supervision.
"He was a real thinking farmer," said Mr. MOORE, "and a good deal deeper than people expected of the head of the farm dept." Those programs gave him an insight into the importance of broadcasting across the country, an understanding that he used "to turn radio into a medium where difficult and large topics could be tackled," said Mr. MOORE. With his "enquiring mind and his lively concern about big issues in society and communications" he was an "anomaly among the people starting radio and television, who were on the whole pretty low brow," according to Mr. MOORE.
He was an anomaly in other ways, too. A devout Irish Catholic who enjoyed a drink or three, Mr. BOYLE hated hypocrisy, top-down bureaucracies and micro-managing. The legendary broadcaster Max FERGUSON was a staff announcer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the late 1940s. By that time Mr. BOYLE was head of the Trans-Can network.
"I was the lowest paid announcer on staff," Mr. FERGUSON remembered yesterday, "Every year we got an annual increment, although we called it the annual excrement because it was about ten dollars a year." That year -- it was 1949 -- Mr. FERGUSON was told by a functionary that he wasn't going to get a raise at all, even though he was doing Rawhide, his satirical commentary in addition to his regular duties.
In the ensuing blow-up, Mr. FERGUSON either quit or was fired for insubordination, depending on who is telling the story. While Mr. FERGUSON was still seething, along came Mr. BOYLE with the suggestion that he should think about selling Rawhide to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on a freelance basis. "He was like the army sergeant interceding for the privates with the officers, except he did it between the announcers and the producers," said Mr. FERGUSON.
"He sold that Rawhide show to them [the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation]for about five times my salary and I was able to move back to Halifax, which I certainly preferred to Toronto. Things worked out beautifully and I owe it all to Harry BOYLE. He was the only one who would listen to you and go to bat for you with his bosses."
When the Dominion Network was established at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Mr. BOYLE created the feature show Assignment which reflected "homey" local stories from across Canada and his real triumph, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Wednesday Night, a mix of opera, musicals, classical and original plays and even documentaries that ran for 90 minutes or three hours depending on the strength of the program. Until then, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation schedule was divided into rigidly fixed and timed segments. What Mr. BOYLE did, to the delight of both listeners and freelance producers, was to make the process more flexible so that the quality of the program determined the schedule rather than the other way around. This was the era that is known as the "golden age" of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with actors and producers of the ilk of John Drainie and Lister Sinclair fusing listeners to their radios.
"He was the making of me," said retired radio producer Howard ENGEL, only one of many people Mr. BOYLE took a chance on as broadcasters. "I was a high-school teacher and not much enjoying it in the mid-1950s," he said, confessing that after a single pedagogical year in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, he had given it up and moved to Toronto and was looking for work. The two met over a drink at a crowded table in the Evereen, a pub across from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on Jarvis Street, just north of the Celebrity Club, a local watering hole that Mr. BOYLE was known to frequent.
He sent Mr. Engel off with a tape recorder and commissioned him to do a short documentary about the celebration of Chinese New Year in Toronto's Chinatown. "That meant I had to learn how to use a tape recorder, to edit tape and to do a mix," Mr. ENGEL said, confessing that he produced a 45 minute script that he had to boil down to about five minutes. He soon became a tape editor on Assignment with host Bill McNEIL.
Mr. BOYLE made the tape recorder an indispensable tool of broadcasting, said Mr. ENGEL, as essential as a typewriter was for print journalists at the time. In doing so, he ruffled the technicians union. He was in favour of unions, said Mr. ENGEL, but he thought this was new territory and in the same way that you wouldn't impose somebody sitting on the lap of a print journalist writing on a typewriter, he believed broadcast journalists should be allowed to go out and record sounds and voices.
Although Mr. BOYLE had a bad enough drinking problem that he would disappear from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for as much as a week at a time, Mr. ENGEL said he could always re-invent and resurrect both himself and his career with brilliant new programming ideas. "He was a multiple phoenix," said Mr. ENGEL, who was able to save himself by his own invention.
He could arouse envy as well as admiration in other broadcasters. Margaret LYONS, former vice-president English radio services for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, was a senior producer in public affairs and "a competitor for air time" in the 1960s. She remembers Mr. BOYLE as "very independent minded" with no patience for political or any other kind of "correctness." Saying that Mr. BOYLE was a great generalist who always wanted to poke fun at the establishment and against all forms of intellectual pretension, she said he was an iconoclast who gave legitimacy to an irreverence about public life and broadcasting bureaucracy. "His commonsensical approach was a good thing," she concluded.
He was always at loggerheads with the brass above him, said Mr. ENGLE and when he went to Ottawa he found himself in the same situation with his political bosses. In 1968, Mr. BOYLE was appointed vice chairman of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission, the independent public authority that regulates and supervises broadcasting and telecommunications in Canada. He succeeded Pierre JUNEAU as chairman when Mr. JUNEAU resigned in 1975 and was later confirmed to the position in 1976.
A committed nationalist, Mr. BOYLE had a huge influence on the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission and the shaping of the 1968 broadcasting act, according to Joan Irwin a journalist who wrote about the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission for a number of print outlets at the time. 'Harry was better at cutting through crap than anybody I have ever known. He was absolutely real and he could see through anybody -- a terrific guy."
Mr. BOYLE left the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission after a year, having gained a reputation, along with Mr. JUNEAU, of safeguarding domestic ownership of Canada's broadcasting industry and creating a set of Canadian content quotas for television, among other initiatives.
In 1977, Mr. BOYLE presided over a committee of inquiry which examined national broadcasting shortly after the victory of the separatist Parti Quebecois victory in Quebec's 1976 election. The report was critical of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for failing to promote communications among the country's regional and linguistic communities, and expressed concern about the centralization of the system, the lack of programming from regions outside central Canada and the gap between French and English audiences.
Mr. BOYLE was also a newspaper columnist, an essayist, novelist and playwright. His novels, included, A Summer Burning (1964), With a Pinch of Sin (1966), Memories of a Catholic Boyhood (1973) and The Luck of the Irish (1975). His radio and stage plays including Strike, The Macdonalds of Oak Valley and The Inheritance. He won the Stephen Leacock award for humour and the John Drainie award.
Harry J. BOYLE was born on October 7, 1915 in St. Augustine, Ontario He died in Toronto on January 22, 2005. He was 89. He is survived by a son and a daughter.

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ENGLEFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-19 published
ENGLEFIELD, George Stanley
Passed away in his 80th year on Sunday, April 17, 2005 after a year long struggle with heart disease at the Scarborough General Hospital. Beloved husband of Mary (née MILLER) of Toronto. Dear father of Lisa RAMIREZ and her husband Jesse; Philip and his wife Brenda. Cherished by his grandchildren Carly and Corey. He will be sadly missed by his sisters Georgina and Margaret and brother Fred. Memorial visitation will take place at the "Scarborough Chapel" of McDougall and Brown, 2900 Kingston Road, (east of St. Clair Ave. E.) on Wednesday, April 20th from 2 p.m. until the time of memorial service in the chapel at 3 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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ENGLEHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-07 published
FRYER, May Barbara
Resident of Rosewood Retirement Centre. Peacefully surrounded by her family on Saturday, March 5, 2005, in her 82nd year, at Kingston General Hospital. Predeceased by her loving husband Charles and son Larry. Beloved mother of Linda VAN RIJN and her husband Trevor, and loving mother-in-law of Gina. Beloved nanny of Melanie and Melissa WARD and Christina and Ashley FRYER. Survived by her sisters Kay LECLERC and Gertrude HUBBARD. Predeceased by her brothers Everett, Ernie, Rollie and Alan PARKER and her sister Alice ENGLEHART. Sadly missed by her nieces Marie SAVARIA and Kathy McMULLEN and family. The family received Friends at the Township Chapel of the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes, 435 Davis Drive (Waterloo Village) in Kingston on Sunday between the hours of 6-9 p.m. and will receive Friends on Monday between the hours of 6-9 p.m. Funeral services will be held in our chapel on Tuesday at 1 p.m. Reverend Bill WHISTON officiating. Interment will follow at Glenhaven Memorial Gardens. Memorial donations for those wishing may be made to the Lung Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. In care of the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes Township Chapel, 435 Davis Drive, Kingston 613-546-5150. Relatives and Friends are invited to sign the Book of Condolence at www.gftompkins-township.ca

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ENGLEHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-04 published
RUSSELL, Harold W.
Passed away at Headwaters Health Care Centre, Orangeville, Ontario on Friday, June 3, 2005. Beloved husband of Cathy RUSSELL (nee EPLETT) of Alliston. Loved father of Charlotte RUSSELL and Steve CRYNE, Joy RUSSELL and Don EARL, all of Oakville, Karen and Lance ROBSON of St. Albert, Alberta. Loving Grandpa of Nicola, Dana, Martin and Cameron. Predeceased by his brother Glenford RUSSELL and his sister Clyle ENGLEHART. Harold will be fondly remembered by the RUSSELL families of British Columbia and the EPLETT families of Ontario. Resting at W. John Thomas Funeral Home, 244 Victoria Street E., Alliston from 6: 30-9:00 p.m. on Monday evening. Funeral Service will be held at Saint John's United Church, 56 Victoria Street E., Alliston on Tuesday, June 7, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m., followed by cremation. If so desired, memorial donations to Habitat for Humanity New Tecumseth or Saint John's United Church Alliston would be appreciated.

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ENGLEMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-15 published
DELP, Annie Pearl (née McFADYEN)
Age 86, of Williamsport, Maryland, died Monday, January 10, 2005 at her home. Born November 27, 1918 in Toronto, Ontario, to the late James and Norma Pearl McBurney McFADYEN. She was employed as a charge aide with Chestnut Lodge of Rockville, Maryland until retiring in 1984. She was of the Protestant Faith. Survived by her husband John Lewis DELP (married December 26, 1962, of Williamsport, Maryland;) daughter Heather M. GOSSARD of Williamsport, Maryland granddaughters Sandra L. ENGLEMAN of Jefferson, Maryland, Christina A. PRICE of Hagerstown, Maryland, Michele D. McDONALD of Coulee Dam, Washington; 7 great-grandchildren; 3 step-grand_sons; 2 step-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by 1 sister Margaret E. SHORT. Memorial Services will be held at Manor Church of the Brethren, 18511 Manor Church Rd., Boonsboro, Maryland, Monday, January 17 at 11: 00 a.m. with the Reverend Joy Zepp officiating. The family will receive Friends at the church from 10: 30 - 11:00 a.m. Interment will be in Manor Cemetery, Boonsboro, Maryland. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Hospice of Washington Co., 1500 Pennsylvania Ave., Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 or Manor Church of the Brethren Music Fund, 18511 Manor Church Rd., Boonsboro, Maryland 21713. Arrangements are by the Osborne Funeral Home.

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ENGLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-23 published
MANDLER, Dr. Walter
(Dipl. Physicist, D.Sc., former V.P., Director of Research and Development of Leitz Canada)
Suddenly at his home, Midland on Thursday, April 21, 2005 in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Hildegunt MANDLER. Dear father of Siegrid ENGLER and her husband Fritz of Mississauga, Claudia McKNIGHT and her husband Michael of Barrie, and the late Gudrun JOHNSON. Loving Opa to Kevin JOHNSON, Christopher ENGLER and his wife Erin, Stephanie ENGLER, and Max McKNIGHT. On Tuesday, April 26th the family will receive visitors from 7-9 p.m. at the Nicholls Funeral Home, 330 Midland Avenue, Midland. The funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 539 Hugel Avenue, Midland on Wednesday April 27th at 11 a.m. Interment at Lakeview Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Salvation Army, Canadian National Institute for the Blind, or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. The family invites you to sign the "Book of Condolence" at www. Obituariestoday.com

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ENGLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-01 published
ENGLER, Brigitte " Gitty"
Peacefully, at North York Seniors' Centre, on December 25, 2004 in her 85th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband Fritz (Sr.) in 1998. Loving mother of Britta BARNES (Toronto) and Fritz (Jr.) and his wife Siegrid (Mississauga). Grandmother of Christopher and his wife Erin, and Stephanie. Predeceased by her sister Liselotte McGUIRE (Florida) in 1994. Family and Friends will be received on Tuesday, January 4, 2005 from 1-2 p.m. at the York Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre, 160 Beecroft Road (at North York Blvd., 416-221-3404). Memorial Service to follow at 2 o'clock. Cremation has taken place with later interment at York Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the North York General Hospital Foundation (specifically Seniors' Health Centre) or to a charity of your choice. Special thanks to the staff of the Seniors' Health Centre for their compassionate care.

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ENGLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-23 published
MANDLER, Dr. Walter
(Dipl. Physicist, D.Sc., former V.P., Director of Research and Development of Leitz Canada) Suddenly at his home, Midland on Thursday, April 21, 2005 in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Hildegunt MANDLER. Dear father of Siegrid ENGLER and her husband Fritz of Mississauga, Claudia McKNIGHT and her husband Michael of Barrie, and the late Gudrun JOHNSON. Loving Opa to Kevin JOHNSON, Christopher ENGLER and his wife Erin, Stephanie ENGLER, and Max McKNIGHT. On Tuesday, April 26th the family will receive visitors from 7-9 p.m. at the Nicholls Funeral Home, 330 Midland Avenue, Midland. The funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 539 Hugel Avenue, Midland on Wednesday, April 27th at 11 a.m. Interment at Lakeview Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Salvation Army, Canadian National Institute for the Blind, or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. The family invites you to sign the "Book of Condolence" at www. Obituariestoday.com

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-06-10 published
SIMMONDS, Edward Ernest " Bud"
Bud passed away suddenly, on Sunday, June 5th, 2005 in his 76th year. He was the beloved husband of the former Shirley ENGLISH. Loving father of Tyrone and his wife, Leslie, Trina SIMMONDS, Trapper and his wife, Kim, Trudy SIMMONDS and Isabel MILBURN and her husband, Gordon. He will be sadly missed by his grandchildren, Trevor, Tasha, Kaitlan, Jordan, Kathy-Jo, Bobbi-Jo and Billie-Jo, as well by his great-grandchildren. Brother of Elva GIBSON and the late Doris McNALLY. Friends are invited to call at the Currie Funeral Home, in Chatsworth, on Wednesday, June 15th, 2005 for visitation from 11: 00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m., directly followed by a Service of Remembrance at 1: 00 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, memorial contributions to Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Foundation, Owen Sound or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.
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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-06 published
REEVES, Grace M. (RATH)
At London Health Sciences Centre, University Campus on Sunday, January 2nd, 2005 Mrs. Grace M. (RATH) REEVES of London in her 95th year. Beloved wife of the late Frank P. REEVES. Dear God-Mother of Susan ENGLISH and her husband Robert of Regina, Saskatchewan and Ellen BROWN and her husband John of Collingwood. Cremation with interment of cremated remains in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London. There will be no funeral home visitation. A service to celebrate Grace's life will be held in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London on Monday, January 10th at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend David R. CARROTHERS of Colborne Street United Church officiating. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-28 published
OSTRANDER, Arthur Edgar
Arthur Edgar OSTRANDER, a resident of Maple Manor Nursing Home, Tillsonburg, passed away at the Nursing Home on Thursday, January 27, 2005 at the age of 98 years. Born in Brantford, Ontario, he was a son of the late George and Emmeline (GILLIS) OSTRANDER. Beloved husband of the late Gladys Marie (KETCHABAW) OSTRANDER (1983.) Loving father of James OSTRANDER and wife Beatrice of Dundas and Mary Ellen ENGLISH and husband Stan of Woodstock. He will be sadly missed by his 6 grandchildren as well as 9 great-granchildren. Mr. OSTRANDER's family will receive Friends at Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg (842-5221) on Saturday, January 29, 2005 from 1-3 p.m., followed by Funeral Serviced for Arthur in Ostrander's Chapel at 3 p.m. with Pastor Bryan BUTCHER officiating. Interment later in the spring in the Eden Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to the Maple Manor Nursing Home, Tillsonburg. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-19 published
ENGLISH, Rena Racheal
Rena Racheal of Blenheim passed away on Monday, April 18, 2005 at Chatham-Kent Health Alliance. Born in London, Ontario 88 years ago daughter of the late Samuel SHED and Margaret MacPHERSON. Rena was a retired public school teacher having taught at Raleigh P.S.#10, Charing Cross Public School and at Blenheim Talbot and W.J. Baird Public Schools. She is survived by her dear husband Jack ENGLISH of Blenheim. Beloved mother of son Doug and his wife Liz of R.R.#3 Chatham. Proud grandmother of Jeffrey and Brian. Also survived by brothers and sisters-in-law, many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her daughter Helen and sister Helen. Resting at the J.L. Ford Funeral Home in Blenheim for visitation on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held at the Charing Cross United Church on Thursday at 2: 00 p.m. with Reverend Dr. Margaret TRAPNELL officiating. Cremation to follow with burial of the urn in Pardoville Union Cemetery at a later date. Memorials to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Charing Cross United Church Memorial Fund would be appreciated.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-25 published
ENGLISH, William " Bill"
Peacefully on Saturday, April 25, 2005, with his family at his side, William "Bill" ENGLISH passed away in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Laurene. Loving father of Bill (Syndee) Esther ENGLISH, Paul (Terry), Don (Robin), Kevin, Colleen LAIDLAW (Steve) and Karen ENGLISH. Devoted grandpa of Brian, Alex, Kristin, Kyle, Lauren, Marshall, Sam, Ben and William. Dear brother of May GRIBBON, George ENGLISH and predeceased by Samuel, Martha and Winnie. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London, for visitation on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow with Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Donations to the Canadian Diabetic Association London and District Branch, 442 Adelaide Street North, London, Ontario, N6B 3H8, gratefully acknowledged. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home 452-3770.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-26 published
ENGLISH, William " Bill"
Peacefully on Saturday, April 23, 2005, with his family at his side, William "Bill" ENGLISH passed away in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Laurene. Loving father of Bill (Syndee,) Esther ENGLISH, Paul (Terry), Don (Robin), Kevin, Colleen LAIDLAW (Steve) and Karen ENGLISH. Devoted grandpa of Brian, Alex, Kristin, Kyle, Lauren, Marshall, Sam, Ben and William. Dear brother of May GRIBBON, George ENGLISH and predeceased by Samuel, Martha and Winnie. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London, for visitation on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow with Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Donations to the Canadian Diabetic Association London and District Branch, 442 Adelaide Street North, London, Ontario, N6B 3H8, gratefully acknowledged. Arrangements entrusted to Memorial Funeral Home 452-3770.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-27 published
ENGLISH, Mary Margaret
Entered into rest peacefully at the Residence on William Street in Lindsay on Monday, April 18, 2005. Mary ENGLISH, in her 93rd year, was the beloved wife of the late Charlie ENGLISH. Mary was a remarkable woman who became the touchstone for her extended family. She will be dearly missed. In keeping with Mary's wishes, cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to call at the Stoddart Funeral Home, 24 Mill Street, Lindsay on Saturday, April 30 from 1: 30 until time of memorial service in the chapel at 2: 00 p.m. If desired, memorial donations to the organization of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-25 published
HODGINS, Helen Annie (DREW)
Peacefully on Monday, May 23rd, 2005, at London Health Sciences Centre, South Street Campus, surrounded by her loving family, Helen Annie HODGINS (DREW) in her 79th year. Predeceased by her husband Murray HODGINS (1995.) Dear mother of Jim HODGINS of Strathroy, Terry HODGINS and his wife Louise of London, and Ron HODGINS and his wife Susi of Strathroy. Beloved grandmother of Tim and his wife Julie, Brian, Mathew and Thomas. Special great-grandmother of James. Helen is survived by her sister Betty ENGLISH and husband George of Watford, and Joe DREW of London. Dear sister-in-law of Blanche DREW of London, Clifton HODGINS and his wife Sandy of Kelowna, British Columbia, June AITKEN of London and Bob JOHNSTON and his wife Maeve of Kingsville. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Helen is predeceased by her brothers, Buddy (1943), and Duncan (2001,) and by her sister Peggy JOHNSTON (1997.) Friends will be received by the family on Wednesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7: 00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks North of Oxford), where the funeral service will be conducted on Thursday, May 26th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Helen are asked to consider the Adam Linton Dialysis Unit through the London Health Sciences Centre-Westminster Campus or the charity of their choice.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-07 published
REEVES, Grace M. (RATH)
At London Health Sciences Centre, University Campus on Sunday, January 2nd, 2005 Mrs. Grace M. (RATH) REEVES of London in her 95th year. Beloved wife of the late Frank P. REEVES. Dear God-Mother of Susan ENGLISH and her husband Robert of Regina, Saskatchewan and Ellen BROWN and her husband John of Collingwood. Cremation with interment of cremated remains in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London. There will no funeral home visitation. A service to celebrate Grace's life will be held in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (1-877-246-7186) on Monday, January 10th at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend David R. CARROTHERS of Colborne Street United Church officiating. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-23 published
ENGLISH, Mary Margaret
Entered into rest peacefully at the Residence on William Street in Lindsay on Monday, April 18, 2005. Mary ENGLISH, in her 93rd year, was the beloved wife of the late Charlie ENGLISH. Mary was a remarkable woman who became the touch stone for her extended family. She will be dearly missed. In keeping with Mary's wishes, cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to call at the Stoddart Funeral Home, 24 Mill Street, Lindsay K9V 2L1 (toll free 1-877-427-8434) on Saturday, April 30 from 1: 30 until time of memorial service in the chapel at 2: 00 p.m. If desired, memorial donations to the organization of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-30 published
Christina McCALL, Journalist, Biographer: 1935-2005
She combined powerful analysis with insightful writing to produce a groundbreaking examination of the Liberals, writes Sandra MARTIN, and then topped that by collaborating on the definitive study of Pierre Trudeau
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, April 30, 2005, Page S9
My, how she could write. Her sentences were as sensuous as they were illuminating. Every word, every comma, was sculpted and buffed as though she were working on marble not paper. Married twice, first to writer Peter NEWMAN and then to political economist Stephen CLARKSON, Christina McCALL moved in powerful political, journalistic and academic circles, but in the past dozen years she was plagued with illnesses, from diabetes to cancer to Parkinson's, and suffered from chronic pain.
Mr. NEWMAN, who flew from London to attend her funeral yesterday in Toronto, compared her to a singer with perfect pitch. "It is not something you learn, You have it or you don't, and she had it." Assessing her importance as a writer, he said: "On the negative side, the quantity wasn't there and I have no explanation for that because she could have done anything and everything. On the positive side, she brought a whole new way of looking at the political world."
Prof. CLARKSON, with whom she collaborated on Trudeau and Our Times, a two-volume study of the late prime minister, said she "had a novelist's intuition," which she applied to political actors instead of imagined characters in a fictional plot. "She could understand their motivation, their psychology and where they came from," he said, explaining that when they did joint interviews, "she would come out understanding the person and I would come out knowing the issues."
Christina McCALL was the daughter of civil servant Christopher Warnock McCALL and Orlie Alma (FREEMAN,) a registered nurse he had married after the death of his first wife. Christina grew up with an older half-brother, Sam, an older sister, Orlie and a younger brother, Brian. She graduated from Jarvis Collegiate in Toronto at 17 and spent that summer working at Maclean's magazine to help earn her tuition at Victoria College in the University of Toronto.
Northrop FRYE was a tremendous influence and she "always talked about his lectures as the intellectual highlight of her life," according to Mr. NEWMAN. She wanted to go on to do graduate work, according to Prof. CLARKSON, but money was scarce. So, after graduating with an honours degree in 1956, she returned as an editorial assistant to Maclean's, which was then under the editorship of Ralph Allan.
He became the second major influence in her life as a writer. "He wasn't religious, but he had all the advantages of believing in goodness and practising it, which is rare for editors," said Mr. NEWMAN. "He was our role model and we became his Disciples and tried to emulate his qualities." Ms. McCALL's first book, Ralph Allan: The Man from Oxbow (1967), was an anthology she edited as a tribute to the legendary magazine editor.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN. " She was very junior," he said, "but I was blown away by her ability," not to mention her allure. "Beauty and intelligence are a potent combination and she had both in spades." They fell in love, but he was already married.
She shifted to Chatelaine magazine. "She came to me in the late 1950s," said Doris ANDERSON, then editor of Chatelaine. "She was wonderful," said Ms. ANDERSON. " She was a great writer, very insightful with an original eye and she used the language with great skill and grace." Ms. McCALL had two other qualities that appealed to Ms. ANDERSON: She generated lots of ideas for the magazine and underneath her demure appearance she was a dedicated feminist.
She was also a woman in love. After Mr. NEWMAN divorced, they married in October of 1959. Shortly afterward, they moved to Ottawa, where Mr. NEWMAN became Ottawa editor of Maclean's. These were the years when he was writing his book Renegade in Power: The Diefenbaker Years with her help and she was beginning her study of Lester Pearson and the Liberal Party.
Asked if she chose the Liberals because he was already working on the Progressive Conservatives, Mr. NEWMAN said no. "Any good journalist in this country knows the Liberals are a natural subject because they are such a force in this country. What gives them such continuity and strength? Analyzing that is the prime ambition of every political journalist." Besides, "the people who ran that party were our Friends and contacts."
The NEWMAN / McCALL marriage collapsed in the early 1970s. They divorced in 1977. By that time, they had long since returned to Toronto. Ms. McCALL had worked as a freelance writer and as a contributing editor and writer to Saturday Night and Maclean's.
She had also become friendly with Prof. CLARKSON. He knew her first through her writing, which he admired for its depth, insights and authority. "You believed what she wrote," he said, "because you knew she had thought about it and often her perceptions were novel."
Prof. CLARKSON and his broadcaster wife, Adrienne CLARKSON, now the Governor-General, split up in 1973. Some time later, he invited Ms. McCALL, who was then working as a national reporter for The Globe and Mail, to have lunch to discuss the federal election of 1974. He asked her to dinner a year later and they gradually began a relationship.
They were married in 1978, bought a new home "to start afresh" with the respective children from their first marriages. "We were the operative parents," Prof. CLARKSON said simply. Later, he and Ms. McCALL adopted each other's daughters. "It was the symbolism of being one family rather than a split family," he said. That tight arrangement led to painful estrangements from the other biological parents -- Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. CLARKSON -- that were only resolved after the passage of time and the birth of grandchildren.
Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party was finally published in 1982. It was dedicated "with love and admiration" to Stephen Hugh Elliott CLARKSON. The book, which caused a sensation, was unlike most political writing at the time. It was a biography of a party, not a person, but it was written as a series of profiles of key figures (Keith Davey, Pierre Trudeau, Jim Coutts, Michael Pitfield, John Turner and Marc Lalonde) from the Pearson years through the Trudeau era.
"Grits is not only a brilliant portrait of how an arthritic party, drenched in scandal, suddenly learned to dance again, but also a textbook on how easily a bunch of young political junkies could take over a party," said historian John ENGLISH. "It endures as one of the finest analyses of Canadian politics ever written." Journalist Robert FULFORD, who picked up Grits again after he heard about Ms. McCALL's death, said: "It is still fresh and full of terrific insights into the politics of the 1960s and 1970s."
Besides forging a tight family unit, Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON decided to collaborate as authors, she bringing her writing talent and political insights and he contributing his organizational skills and policy analysis to their study of Trudeau, which won the Governor-General's award for volume one, The Magnificent Obsession in 1990. Prof. CLARKSON said the process was agonizing because her method was to start with the introduction and polish it before moving on, an approach he thought akin to "building the front door before you've got the basement foundations in."
They wrote every sentence sitting side by side at the same keyboard. Every few pages, they would "print out" and "haggle" over the punctuation and the wording. "It was very, very slow," he said. Even he can't remember who actually wrote of Mr. Trudeau, "He haunts us still," saying that their editor Doug GIBSON at McClelland & Stewart also had a role in shaping the iconic sentence. Mr. GIBSON recalls that they had written, "He still haunts us," and he shifted the emphasis by moving the second word to the end of the sentence.
Writing wasn't the only agony that Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON shared. For most of their marriage, she was in severe physical pain and he was the gentle and loving caregiver. "In the mid-1970s, she had back pain and then arthritis, but the serious illnesses began in 1993," he said, "when she was diagnosed with diabetes, followed by breast cancer four years later." It wasn't so much the malignancy, but the treatment that caused many of her subsequent health problems.
The surgeon cut her brachial nerve during an operation to remove the tumour in her breast, leaving her left shoulder, arm and hand in chronic pain. "She was a very classy, elegant woman and writer," said broadcaster Eleanor WACHTEL, who became a friend in the late 1990s, "but she was also very private."
Ms. McCALL didn't want anybody to know that she had breast cancer, and didn't want to be seen looking frail and ill. Ms. McCALL's world shrank and she saw fewer and fewer people as her illnesses progressed. Managing her pain grew harder, although she continued to help her friend Rosemary SPEIRS strategize for the Equal Voice website (a movement to increase the number of women in elected office in Canada). The real downhill journey began about a year ago when she could no longer be cared for at home. Until almost the end, though, say the few Friends who visited her, she was a very astute, very witty and very engaging conversationalist.
It was a rough and frustrating passage for the woman many considered the best political writer and analyst of her generation.
Christina McCALL was born in Toronto on January 29, 1935. She died in Toronto of cancer on Wednesday. She was 70. She is survived by her husband, Stephen CLARKSON, three children and their families.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-31 published
MARTIN, Dr. Julius
It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Dr. Julius MARTIN, Dermatologist. Julius was a loving and devoted husband to Ellen MARTIN; father to Dr. Robert (Sheila) MARTIN, Dr. Sonia MARTIN (Peter MANUEL), Dr. Petra MARTIN, Nina MARTIN (Ned ENGLISH) grandfather to Stephanie and Connor; brother to Dr. Ruth (Dr. Peter) KUHLMAN, Dr. Sylvia MARTIN (Dr. Len MARX). He was a son of the late Martha and Ernest MARTIN. Julius came from a modest family of Jewish decent and endured great hardship during his childhood in wartime. His experiences, brilliance and intelligence led him to pursue a career in helping others. He put himself through medical school while raising a family and graduated top in his class, earning first class honours and receiving a medal for top standing in Medicine and Surgery. Julius entered the Internal Medicine program and completed his fellowship. Following this, he directly entered into the Dermatology Residency program where he excelled. He was well read and published a number of journal articles. Dr. MARTIN worked hard and set-up clinics all over Nova Scotia where he commuted long hours through the rain, sleet, hail, blizzards and snowstorms on a daily basis. He saw patients at all hours and on all days, accommodating anyone who needed his help. Loving to talk to people, he always had a smile and a kind word to say. Dr. MARTIN loved his work and the people he worked with. He devoted himself to his patients and colleagues by sharing his knowledge, kindness, caring, laughter and compassion. Dr. MARTIN provided top quality health care to the people of Nova Scotia for over 20 years. Julius loved and adored his family. He enjoyed the outdoors and could often be seen walking his two beautiful cocker spaniels. Julius was an accomplished pianist, junior chess champion, and won many tennis tournaments in his time. Dr. MARTIN was a kind, gentle spirit who touched many lives. He was much loved by his family and will be greatly missed, never forgotten, forever in our hearts, minds and souls. Arrangements have been entrusted to Atlantic Funeral Home, 771 Main Street, Dartmouth, where Julius' family will receive Friends from 7-8: 30 p.m. Wednesday and from where the funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Thursday. Reception to follow in Atlantic Funeral Home Family Reception Centre. On-line condolences may be sent to the family by visiting: www.atlanticfuneralhomes.com.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-28 published
ABT, Joseph Anton (1940-2005)
Born in Yugoslavia and raised in Germany, Joe immigrated with his family to Canada in 1953. Lovingly remembered by his wife Linda (GUY) of Dundas, his mother Barbara ABT of Kitchener, his sister Hilde (John) ENGLISH, sons Sandy (Denise,) Curtis (Jill) ABT, Jacquie (Steve) HOUSE, and Mike (Sue) MERRILL. Joe was employed by the Government of Canada until his retirement when he went into private practice as an insolvency trustee in Hamilton. Friends will be received by the family on Thursday afternoon from 1 until the Celebration of Joe's Life at 2 o'clock at the Cattel, Eaton & Chambers Funeral Home, 53 Main Street, Dundas. Cremation has taken place. www.catteleatonandchambers.ca

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-28 published
MARSHALL, John Maitland
Passed away peacefully after a long and difficult illness, on October 26, 2005. A passionate bibliophile and ardent supporter of social justice. He is survived by his wife Betsy ENGLISH, his daughter Kathleen HERON and her husband Chuck, his son John and his wife Mary MORISON, his niece Penny ROBINSON and five grandchildren. He was predeceased by his first wife Christine (née SMITH.) A family service will be held at Rosedale United Church (159 Roxborough Drive.) on Friday, October 28, at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers contributions to the Stephen Lewis Foundation, 260 Spadina Ave. Suite #501 Toronto, Ontario M5T 2E4 (www.stephenlewisfoundation.org) would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements by the Newbigging Funeral Home.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-03 published
Frank SUMA, Insurance Executive: (1924-2005)
Immigrant success story wrote his own death notice and surprised Friends and family that he had fought in the Italian resistance and been decorated by a U.S. general
By Kathy ENGLISH, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, November 3, 2005, Page S7
Toronto -- When he was a young man living in the Italian countryside outside Pisa during the last months of the Second World War, Frank SUMA would sit on the rooftop of a medieval church each night and watch as German planes bombed the bridge across the River Arno.
The next day, American soldiers, battling to liberate Italy from German occupation, would rebuild the bridge. Come nightfall, the Germans would once again bomb it.
"He told us vivid stories about sitting on the roof watching the Germans blow up the bridge night after night. He'd be terrified, watching the bombs separate from the aircraft," said Mr. SUMA's son, Peter.
While Mr. SUMA shared this story with his family, he wasn't as forthcoming about other details from his war years. Just weeks before his death, his family discovered that Mr. SUMA had joined the Italian resistance in 1943, at the age of 19. And he was awarded a gold medal for actions in support of U.S. General Mark Clark's 5th Army in Tuscany in 1944. The family learned this in reading the death notice that Mr. SUMA had written. By this time, however, Lou Gehrig's disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) had robbed him of his ability to speak.
"All of us were surprised when we read the death notice he wrote. I had suspected he had seen some kind of military action, but I was truly shocked to learn he had been awarded a medal," Peter SUMA said.
"Growing up, we never really thought to ask, 'So daddy, what did you do in the war?" said Mr. SUMA's daughter, Caroline. "I remember him talking about hardships; getting up early and lining up for horse meat, and hating the corn, which was not the peaches and cream corn we eat here, but cattle corn. For the rest of his life, my father could not look at a cob of corn."
Far beyond a distaste for corn, the events of the Second World War that reshaped Europe would -- as it did for so many Europeans alter the course of Mr. SUMA's life. In the postwar period, while working with the Red Cross in Milan to help place displaced Eastern European refugees in other countries, he became enamoured with the idea of emigrating. A passionate reader who spoke five languages, he had read a book about Canada and decided it would be his new home.
Though Italy had been his home for more than 20 years and he regarded himself as Italian, Gaspar (Frank) SUMA was Albanian by birth. Born to Albanian nobility that traced its roots back to the 14th century, Mr. SUMA was six months old when his family fled Albania in 1925 when Ahmed Zog declared himself king of Albania.
Mr. SUMA was educated in elite schools in Paris, Vienna and Pisa. "I think he spent a lot of time chasing women," Peter SUMA said. "He was educated and charming and everyone thought he looked like Rosanno Brazzi. He said there was a period of about two or three years right after the war when everyone was in love with being alive."
In 1951, Mr. SUMA arrived at Halifax aboard the S.S. Anna Salen. He settled first in Hamilton, Ontario, where, to fulfill his immigration conditions, he worked cleaning machines in a textile plant.
It was the only manual labour he would do in Canada. Thereafter, Mr. SUMA forged business and personal relationships with some of this country's most successful postwar Italian-Canadian immigrants and, in so doing, achieved financial success in the insurance industry. He also earned the respect of his community for his ability to raise funds for many causes, including the Rotary Club, arts organizations and Villa Columbo, Canada's first Italian-Canadian home for seniors.
"He was a high-profile guy in the Italian community and he was proud of his Italian origins," said Dominic D'ALLESSANDRO, president and Chief Executive Officer of Manulife Financial, the company Mr. SUMA was affiliated with from 1965 until last December, when he sold his agency. "He built an enormous book of business."
In 1990, Mr. SUMA achieved Manulife's highest distinction, that of a Five-Star Master Builder, an honour conferred on a fraction of 30,000 Manulife insurance agents in North America.
Mr. SUMA's career in insurance began in 1956 when Sam SORBARA, an Italian immigrant and founder of the Sorbara Group, asked him to run his insurance company, Adriatic Insurance Brokers.
Mr. SUMA was then working as a writer and advertising salesman at Corriere Canadese, the Italian-Canadian newspaper founded by Dan IANNUZZI in 1954. The two men had become Friends when Mr. SUMA moved to Toronto in 1952. According to Edward SORBARA, now chairman of the Sorbara Group, his father, a founder of the Canadian Italian Business and Professional Association, met Mr. SUMA and Mr. IANNUZZI in the early 1950s.
"Corriere Canadese needed money and somehow Dan and Frank found my father and convinced him to put money into it," Mr. SORBARA said. "Before long, Frank was working for my father."
In 1951, the year Mr. SUMA arrived in Canada, about 150,000 Italian immigrants lived in Canada. That number swelled through the postwar economic boom, growing by about 25,000 annually until 1961, when the number reached 450,000. "He sold insurance to a lot of the Italian community," Mr. SORBARA said. "Even then, a lot of Italian immigrants were developing small fortunes and Frank got to know them and he grew with them."
Mr. SUMA never lost his connection to old world Europe. Passionate about medieval art and architecture, he made regular family visits to Italy. "When everyone else went to Florida, we went to Italy. Dad would rent a car and we would drive from church to church," said Peter SUMA. "By the age of 11, I could tell you the difference between baroque and Gothic architecture and tell you how to build a Romanesque cathedral."
Over the years, he was instrumental in raising funds for the University of Toronto's Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, the McMichael Gallery and the Mississauga Art Gallery.
"He had an ability to squeeze money out of people for a good cause," said long-time friend Tony CARELLA, a city councillor in Vaughn, Ontario "When it came time to get something financed, he could go to the heavy hitters in the Italian community and get what he needed."
Gaspar (Frank) SUMA was born in Scutari, Albania, on June 25, 1924. He died in Mississauga, Ontario, on September 17, 2005, from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis disease. He was 81. He leaves his wife, Audrey, and children Caroline and Peter.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-03 published
ENGLISH, Lloyd George
Passed away peacefully at Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket on Wednesday, February 2, 2005, Lloyd ENGLISH, of Keswick (formerly of Queensville) in his 86th year. Predeceased by his parents Nellie and David ENGLISH, his brothers Walter and Horace ENGLISH. Lloyd will be greatly missed by many cousins and his Friends in the Keswick and Queensville area. Visitation from the M.W. Becker Funeral Home, 490 The Queensway S., Keswick, 1-888-884-4486, on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service from the chapel on Saturday, February 5, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Queensville Cemetery. If desired, donations made to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-17 published
WILSON, Robert D.C.
(Retired Fruit and Vegetable Inspector with Agriculture Canada). Passed away suddenly, on Tuesday, February 15, 2005. Bob WILSON, of Willow Beach, in his 79th year. Predeceased by his wife Evelyn WILSON (ENGLISH.) Loving father of Lisa Anne BYLEVELD (Brian) of Port Perry, and Linda Marie WILSON of Willow Beach. Proud Poppa of Matthew and Brooklyn. Bob will be greatly missed by many Friends and relatives. Visitation from M.W. Becker Funeral Home, 490 The Queensway South, Keswick, 1-888-884-4486 on Friday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service from the Chapel on Saturday, February 19, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Queensville Cemetery. If desired, donations made to Maple Hill Baptist Church or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-23 published
ENGLISH, Mary Margaret
Entered into rest peacefully, at the Residence on William Street in Lindsay, on Monday, April 18, 2005. Mary ENGLISH, in her 93rd year, was the beloved wife of the late Charlie ENGLISH. Mary was a remarkable woman who became the touch stone for her extended family. She will be dearly missed. In keeping with Mary's wishes, cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to call at the Stoddart Funeral Home, 24 Mill Street, Lindsay K9V 2L1 (toll free 1-877-427-8434), on Saturday, April 30 from 1: 30 p.m. until time of Memorial Service in the Chapel at 2: 00 p.m. If desired, memorial donations to the organization of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-05 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Irene Mary
Peacefully, at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga on Sunday, July 3, 2005 in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late William THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Loving mother of Jeanette PROSSER of Mississauga, Robert THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of England, Pauline ENGLISH and her husband Michael of England. Dear grandmother of eight grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Funeral service will be held at Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Thursday, July 7, 2005 at 3 p.m. with visitation beginning at 2 p.m. Cremation.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-01 published
Rabbi 'a father of Jewish education'
Pushed the province to fund Jewish schools
'In his blood he knew the art of teaching'
By Naomi CARNIOL, Staff Reporter
Rabbi Irwin WITTY made sure no Jewish child in Toronto lacked a Jewish education because of money.
During his years as executive director of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education, he worked with United Jewish Appeal to ensure money was put aside for children who could not afford tuition at local Jewish schools.
After he retired, he continued to push the provincial government to fund Jewish schools.
WITTY died Saturday night in Toronto. He was 73.
Jewish education was WITTY's lifelong passion, colleagues said.
"In his blood he knew the art of teaching," said Seymour EPSTEIN, the board's current executive director.
Born in Brooklyn in 1932, WITTY graduated from Yeshiva University in New York. He worked as a teacher and principal in Philadelphia and Winnipeg.
In Winnipeg, he was also a pulpit rabbi at a synagogue for seven years and helped found a charitable organization to support the Winnipeg Hebrew School. In 1969, WITTY became executive director of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education. He held the position until 1997.
In Toronto, WITTY helped found the Dr. Abraham Shore Academy She'arim Hebrew Day School, which runs programs for Jewish children with learning disabilities.
WITTY believed Jewish education strengthened not only the Jewish community. In a 1985 interview with the Star, he said, "I think we've learned from other groups that the preservation of collective ethnic identity enriches society in general."
EPSTEIN praised WITTY's "vast and deep knowledge of his subject matter, which was Judaica, Jewish history, Jewish philosophy..."
Howard ENGLISH, a spokesman for the United Jewish Appeal Federation of Greater Toronto, worked with WITTY during the rabbi's years with the board of education.
"He was one of a rare breed of educators who was respected by the whole spectrum of the Jewish community.... More importantly, he respected everyone, no matter what their religious denomination," ENGLISH said.
EPSTEIN agreed. "He led an Orthodox lifestyle and was an Orthodox rabbi, but he was beyond tolerant. He truly identified with Jews of all different persuasions. He was a kind of model of what a Jewish educator should be."
Bernie FARBER, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Jewish Congress, said WITTY was recognized around the world as a leader in Jewish education. That was partly because of the changes he brought to the board.
"He took a small supervisory body and made it into a major source of school consultative services," FARBER said.
Three years ago, WITTY became the executive director of the Albert and Temmy Latner Jewish Public Library.
While WITTY was devoted to education, he also loved music, colleagues said. And he had a soft spot for a good joke.
"He had a great repertoire of hilarious stories," EPSTEIN said.
"It was impossible to follow him on stage because he had a booming presence," FARBER said. "He would tell a joke and when he left the stage people were still laughing."
WITTY used humour to reach out to people. "He was able to communicate with people in their language," FARBER said.
"He didn't speak at people. He spoke to people."
A memorial service for WITTY was held yesterday at the Clanton Park Synagogue. The funeral will be held today in Israel.
WITTY leaves his wife Shulamith, their four children and 22 grandchildren.
He will be greatly mourned by Jewish educators, and the students who benefited from his teaching.
Said FARBER: "He was a father of Jewish education in Canada."

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-27 published
SULTANA, Jennifer (née KEY)
Suddenly on Sunday, September 25, 2005 at the age of 44. Daughter of Muriel MAGEE and the late Alexander KEY (1977,) step-daughter to James MAGEE. Loving mother to Rachel and Amy. Cherished sister to Carol (Ian COLLETTE), Alexander KEY (Margaret), Marie (Tony SCHOENMAKERS), Graham KEY, Vivian BAUER, and Elizabeth ENGLISH (Greg). She will be sadly missed by many aunts and uncles, nieces and nephews, cousins and Friends. She will be remembered by Lou SULTANA. Jennifer was a part of the Brampton Southern Cruisers where she participated in fund raising, she also enjoyed athletics. Jennifer was a devoted employee of Dr. Gavin GIES for over 20 years. Friends will be received on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Andrews Community Funeral Centre, 8190 Dixie Road, Brampton (north of Steeles) 905-456-8190. A Funeral Service will be held on Thursday, September 29, 2005 at 11 a.m. in the funeral home chapel. In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-15 published
PARENTEAU, Amy (formerly FOULIS, née WILLIAMS) (1913-2005)
Passed away, at the Roberta Place in Barrie, Ontario, on Monday, October 10, 2005. Amy Hall PARENTEAU (née WILLIAMS,) in her 93rd year. Beloved wife of the late Edmund (Spud) PARENTEAU, she was predeceased by her first husband, Frank FOULIS. Graduating in 1938 from Western Hospital in Toronto, Amy worked as a Red Cross nurse in Bracebridge and Dryden, Ontario. She spent her later years at Thunder Lake, Dryden and at Tarpon Springs and Titusville, Florida. She was preceded in death by her parents Richard and Martha Muzetta WILLIAMS (née AMY,) her sister Helen Muzetta HARRIS, her niece Margaret Jean ROBERTSON and step-daughters Leila BERREY and Del McDOUGALD. She will be sadly missed by her nieces Anah E. HUNTER of Barrie, Ontario, Mary I. PIETTE of Bainbridge Island, Washington; E. Ruth ENGLISH of Melrose, Ontario, step-daughter Tan WIGLE of Vancouver, British Columbia and step-son Mike PARENTEAU of Concord, New Hampshire. She was loved dearly by her many nieces and nephews and step-grandchildren - the Berreys, the McDougalds, the Wigles and the PARENTEAUs. A pianist with a swing, an avid golfer, and a loving friend to so many, she celebrated life. Amy's family especially extends thanks to the Roberta Place staff who cared for her so well. Cremation has taken place. Graveside services will be held at a later date in Belleville, Ontario. Memorial donations may be made to the Dryden Hospital Foundation through the Jennett Chapel of the McClelland and Slessor Funeral Home, 152 Bradford Street in Barrie, Ontario L4N 3B5 (705) 722-6656. Words of comfort may be forwarded to the family at amyparenteau@funeralhome.on.ca

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-17 published
ENGLISH, W. Michael
Suddenly, at his home in Bracebridge, on Friday, October 14, 2005. Beloved husband of Ruth. Loving father of Ron of Ajax and Elaine RODECK (Bruce) of Omaha, Nebraska. Brother of June THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Roy,) Wilda ENGLISH and Leila DUPLIN (Larry.) Member of Muskoka Lodge, No.360, The Muskoka Shrine Club and Rotary Club of Bracebridge. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home "Turner Chapel," 1 Mary Street, Bracebridge (1-877-806-2257), on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held at Pinegrove Baptist Church in Bracebridge on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-20 published
BLACK- ENGLISH, Jeffrey
Tragically on Monday, October 17th, 2005. Jeffrey beloved son of Ken ENGLISH and his partner Pamela and Patricia BLACK and her partner Ronald. Devoted brother of Melissa and Amber. Cherished grand_son of Ken and Marie ENGLISH and George and Patricia BLACK. Jeffrey will be lovingly remembered by his aunts, uncles, cousins and many Friends. Friends may call at the Accettone Funeral Home, 384 Finley Ave., Ajax (905-428-9090) on Saturday, October 22nd from 10 a.m. until 12 p.m. A celebration of Jeffrey's life will follow in the chapel at 12 noon.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-05 published
ENGLISH, Sophie
Peacefully on Sunday, December 4, 2005 in her 86th year. Beloved wife of the late John (Jack). Loving mother of Robert (Bob) and his wife Marylin. Dear grandmother of Brent and Chad. Dear sister of Walter, Peter, Paula, Rose, Jean and the late Alec and Anne. Mrs. ENGLISH is resting at the funeral home of Skinner and Middlebrook Ltd., 128 Lakeshore Rd. E. (1 block west of Hurontario St.), Mississauga (parking off Ann St.) on Monday evening from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Tuesday, December 6, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Cremation. Special thanks to the caring staff of Aspen Grove at Cawthra Gardens.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-05 published
MASON, William " Bill" James
It is with great sadness that the family announces the passing of William on Saturday, December 3, 2005 at the Toronto General Hospital at the age of 93 years. William is predeceased by his parents Patrick and Mary Ellen (née ENGLISH) and by his sister Winnifred Mary MASON. William " Bill" MASON was born on September 22, 1912 in Brigus, Newfoundland. His family came to Sydney, Nova Scotia during the First World War where his father worked in the steel plant. He served gallantly in the Second World War on a ship (frigate) called the Stormont as a stoker from 1943 to 1945. William had worked for his last 12 years of employment at Canada Post where he retired. William always kept track of his family and Friends. He had a love for sports and enjoyed skating, walking and was very active well into his 90's. William was a bachelor all of his life and lived his life to the fullest. He gave generously to many organizations and touched many lives. William will be missed dearly by all of us who knew him. Friends may call at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne St. (south of Wellesley) on Tuesday, December 6, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Wednesday, December 7, 2005 at 10 a.m. from Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church (Gerrard/DeGrassi). Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Catholic Missions in Canada, the Scott Mission or to the Good Shepherd Refuge Social Ministries would be welcomed.

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ENGLISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-11 published
HARPER, Stewart Henry
Peacefully, at Stevenson Memorial Hospital, Alliston, on Friday December 9, 2005. Stewart HARPER, in his 66th year, loving husband of Ellen (née HALLETT.) Loving father of Kathy ENGLISH, and Bill (Jo-Anne) ENGLISH. Beloved grandfather of Kaitlyn. Dear brother of Iris (late John ESSLEMONT,) Beryl (late George SUTHERLAND,) Allan (Lexie) and fondly remembered by his nephew, nieces, and their families, all in Scotland. Sadly missed by Ellen's family. Resting at Rod Abrams Funeral Home, 1666 Tottenham Road, Tottenham, 905-936-3477 on Monday, December 12, 2005 from 11: 00 a.m. until time of Funeral Service in the Chapel at 1: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow. Donations in Stewart's memory to Royal Victoria Hospital, Cancer Care Centre, Barrie, would be appreciated by the family.

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ENGMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-15 published
WHOOLY, John
Surrounded by his loving family, John passed away very peacefully in his 100th year into the Lord's arms on Sunday, October 9, 2005 in Oakville, Ontario. Beloved husband of the late Eileen WHOOLY and loving father to his three devoted daughters, Maureen ENGMAN, Eileen SMITH, and Sheila LÉGER (Normand). Also survived by his six adoring grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren. Predeceased by grand_son Eric ENGMAN and sons-in-law Alexander SMITH and Terry ENGMAN. John has left behind a life's worth of wonderful memories. His mother died at childbirth and his lifelong dream was to see his mother's beautiful face and to feel his mother's arms around him in God's kingdom. Oh, the joy and oh, the beauty this day has brought to him. Heaven has been blessed. Anyone wishing to honour his memory may do so by giving freely of themselves in need, by comforting the sick and by passing around as much love and kindness as they can. His kind and gentle spirit is with us all today and forever more. A private family Funeral Mass was held on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 at Saint Mary Star of the Sea Church in Mississauga. Interment at the family plot, Saint Mary's Cemetery, Mississauga.

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