FULCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-14 published
FULCHER, Edith
Peacefully at Leisureworld, North Bay, on Friday, February 11, 2005, in her 97th year. Beloved sister of Bessie JACKSON of Kelowna, Lillian GROVES of Toronto, and the late Gertrude GOSNELL of Iroquois Falls. Dear aunt of Kathleen CHIDLEY, the late Arthur JACKSON, the late Frances SPENCER, Helen EATON and Robert GROVES, and fondly remembered by their families. She will be remembered for her dedication to the teaching profession, charitable works and her love of travel and sports. In accordance with her wishes, no memorial service will be conducted. If desired, donations may be made to the North Bay Hospital Foundation, P.O. Box 2500, North Bay, Ontario P1B 5A4.

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FULCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-07 published
GARRITY, Kenneth Gordon
Peacefully on Monday, June 6, 2005 at Toronto East General Hospital, in his 67th year. Ken, loving husband of Norma. Dear brother of Teresa GARRITY- HOPCRAFT, Ralph, Patrick, Linda FULCHER and Sharon ROEDER. Friends may call at the Jerrett Funeral Home, 660 Kennedy Road, Scarborough (between Eglinton and St. Clair Aves. E.) on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service on Thursday, June 9, 2005 at 11 a.m. Interment St. Cornelius Cemetery, Caledon. In memory of Ken, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Toronto East General Hospital would be appreciated.

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FULCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-26 published
SECORD, Gordon
The family of Gordon SECORD sadly announces his sudden passing on December 22, 2005. Gordon Donald SECORD, dear husband of Dianne (LANGLEY) SECORD. Loving father of Dianna and Phil HUDON. Brother of Zoe SECORD and sister and brother-in-law Rosslyn and Bruce FULCHER. Dear uncle of Sarrah and Kevin HENNESSY. Not only will Gordon be missed by family and Friends, but, also by his horses and dogs. A memorial service will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church, Elora, (corner of Henderson and Smith), Wednesday, December 28, 2005, at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, in memoriams made to the Ross R. MacKay Public School Playground Fund, Hillsburgh, would be appreciated.

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FULDNER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-26 published
HENSEN, Wilhelmina (FULDNER)
At Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Saturday, December 24th, 2005, Wilhelmina (FULDNER) HENSEN of Strathroy in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Michel HENSEN (1999.) Funeral arrangements incomplete at this time. Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy entrusted with details. (519) 245-1023.

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FULDNER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-27 published
HENSEN, Wilhelmina (née FULDNER)
"Now we know if the Earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in Heaven, not built by human hands," II Corinth 5: 1
The family of Wilhelmina HENSEN (née FULDNER) sadly announces her sudden passing at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on Saturday, December 24th, 2005 in her 87th year, Mother was the beloved wife of the late Michel W. HENSEN (1999.) She was the dear Mother of John and Elaine of Buckhorn, Paul and Debby of Pickering, Margaret and Bob VOLLICK of Coldstream, Arnold of Nanaimo, Patricia and Dave BUUCK of Stratford and Michael and Ruta of London. Missing her terribly are her beloved grandchildren Nicole (HENSEN) and Ian GIDLUCK of Airdrie, Alberta, Teralyn HENSEN and Jay OLIVER of London, Shawn HENSEN of Waterloo, Annette (HENSEN) and Jay HEWITT of Whitby, Jeffery HENSEN of Pickering, Matthew VOLLICK and Nathan VOLLICK of Coldstream and Kathryn (VOLLICK) and Ron MINTEN of Keyser. She was the proud Great Grandmother of Alexander GIDLUCK, Conor HENSEN- OLIVER, Nathan HEWITT and Leyna MINTEN. Mother is survived by a sister, Ina of Ijmuiden, The Netherlands. She was predeceased by a brother Gottlob. Visitation will be held at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Tuesday, December 27th, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A service to celebrate the life of our Mother will be held on Wednesday, December 28th, at 11 a.m. in the East Christian Reformed Church, 476 Metcalfe St. East with Pastor Walter DE RUITER officiating. Interment to follow in Friends Cemtery in Coldstream. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Strathroy Community Christian School would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be panted as a living memorial to Wilhelmina.

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FULDNER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-12-28 published
HENSEN, Wilhelmina (née FULDNER)
"Now we know if the Earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in Heaven, not built by human hands," II Corinth 5: 1
The family of Wilhelmina HENSEN (née FULDNER) sadly announces her sudden passing at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on Saturday, December 24th, 2005 in her 87th year, Mother was the beloved wife of the late Michel W. HENSEN (1999.) She was the dear Mother of John and Elaine of Buckhorn, Paul and Debby of Pickering, Margaret and Bob VOLLICK of Coldstream, Arnold of Nanaimo, Patricia and Dave BUUCK of Stratford and Michael and Ruta of London. Missing her terribly are her beloved grandchildren Nicole (HENSEN) and Ian GIDLUCK of Airdrie, Alberta, Teralyn HENSEN and Jay OLIVER of London, Shawn HENSEN of Waterloo, Annette (HENSEN) and Jay HEWITT of Whitby, Jeffery HENSEN of Pickering, Matthew VOLLICK and Nathan VOLLICK of Coldstream and Kathryn (VOLLICK) and Ron MINTEN of Keyser. She was the proud Great Grandmother of Alexander GIDLUCK, Conor HENSEN- OLIVER, Nathan HEWITT and Leyna MINTEN. Mother is survived by a sister, Ina of Ijmuiden, The Netherlands. She was predeceased by a brother Gottlob. Visitation will be held at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Tuesday, December 27th, 2005 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A service to celebrate the life of our Mother will be held on Wednesday, December 28th, at 11 a.m. in the East Christian Reformed Church, 476 Metcalfe St. East with Pastor Walter DE RUITER officiating. Interment to follow in Friends Cemetery in Coldstream. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Strathroy Community Christian School would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Wilhelmina.

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FULDNER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2005-12-27 published
HENSEN, Wilhelmina (née FULDNER)
Now we know if the Earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in Heaven, not built by human hands. II Corinth. 5: 1.
The family of Wilhelmina HENSEN (née FULDNER) sadly announces her sudden passing at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on Saturday, December 24, 2005, in her 87th year. Mother was the beloved wife of the late Michel W. HENSEN (1999.) She was the dear mother of John and Elaine of Buckhorn, Paul and Debby of Pickering, Margaret and Bob VOLLICK of Coldstream, Arnold of Nanaimo, Patricia and Dave BUUCK of Stratford, and Michael and Ruta of London. Missing her terribly are her beloved grandchildren, Nicole (HENSEN) and Ian GIDLUCK of Airdrie, Alberta; Teralyn HENSEN and Jay OLIVER of London; Shawn HENSEN of Waterloo; Annette (HENSEN) and Jay HEWITT of Whitby; Jeffery HENSEN of Pickering Matthew VOLLICK and Nathan VOLLICK of Coldstream, and Kathryn (VOLLICK) and Ron MINTEN of Keyser. She was the proud great-grandmother of Alexander GIDLUCK, Conor HENSEN- OLIVER, Nathan HEWITT, and Leyna MINTEN. Mother is survived by a sister, Ina of Ijmuiden, the Netherlands. She was predeceased by a brother Gottlob. Visitation was held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy, on Tuesday, December 27, 2005, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A service to celebrate the life of our mother was held on Wednesday, December 28 at 11 a.m. in the East Christian Reformed Church, 476 Metcalfe St. East with Pastor Walter DE RUITER officiating. Interment followed in Friends Cemetery in Coldstream. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Strathroy Community Christian School would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Wilhelmina.

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FULFIT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-30 published
DAULMAN, Josephine (HAILWOOD)
Peacefully at William Osler Health Centre, Etobicoke Campus on Thursday, September 29, 2005, Josephine HAILWOOD, in her 75th year, beloved wife of the late Arthur DAULMAN. Loving mother of Lynda and Cameron SMITH, Joanne and Tim BARBOUR. Cherished grandmother of Kent, Kayla, Keenan and Kaleena SMITH, Cheryl and Lori BARBOUR. Dear sister of Jim and Edna HAILWOOD, Bill HAILWOOD, Loretta HAILWOOD and predeceased by Ada FULFIT and Polly GAY. Josephine will always be remembered with love by her many relatives and Friends. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Saturday morning, October 1 from 10 o'clock until time of funeral service in the chapel at 11 o'clock. Private interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery, Weston. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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FULFORD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-04-30 published
MEIDINGER, Veronica
At Stratford General Hospital, on Thursday, April 28, 2005, Mrs. Veronica MEIDINGER of Clinton and formerly of Seaforth in her 78th year. Beloved wife of the late Delmer MEIDINGER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Anthony and Lorraine MEIDINGER of London, Phyllis and Edward JEFFREY of Kingsville, Joanne and Joseph FEDDER of Vineland, Patrick and Carol MEIDINGER of London, Michael and Shirley MEIDINGER of Egmondville, Francis MEIDINGER of London, Catherine HENDERSON of London, and Glenda MEIDINGER of Egmondville. Cherished grandmother of 19 grandchildren and 12 greatgrandchildren. Dear sister of Armelda FULFORD of Clinton, RoseAnne McNICHOL of Egmondville, John AUBIN of Egmondville, Victor AUBIN of Kitchener, Lloyd and Mary Lou AUBIN of Goderich, and Andre and Helen AUBIN of Cambridge. Predeceased by by her son Gerard MEIDINGER, 3 sisters and 3 brothers. Friends will be received at the Box and Smith Funeral Chapel, 47 High Street, Seaforth, on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of the Christian Burial will be held at St. James Roman Catholic Church, Seaforth, on Monday May 2, 2005 at 11 a.m. Father Lance MAGDZIAK will officiate. Interment St. James Cemetery, Seaforth. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Parish Prayers will be held at the funeral home Sunday evening at 8: 30 P.M.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-30 published
Christina McCALL, Journalist, Biographer: 1935-2005
She combined powerful analysis with insightful writing to produce a groundbreaking examination of the Liberals, writes Sandra MARTIN, and then topped that by collaborating on the definitive study of Pierre Trudeau
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, April 30, 2005, Page S9
My, how she could write. Her sentences were as sensuous as they were illuminating. Every word, every comma, was sculpted and buffed as though she were working on marble not paper. Married twice, first to writer Peter NEWMAN and then to political economist Stephen CLARKSON, Christina McCALL moved in powerful political, journalistic and academic circles, but in the past dozen years she was plagued with illnesses, from diabetes to cancer to Parkinson's, and suffered from chronic pain.
Mr. NEWMAN, who flew from London to attend her funeral yesterday in Toronto, compared her to a singer with perfect pitch. "It is not something you learn, You have it or you don't, and she had it." Assessing her importance as a writer, he said: "On the negative side, the quantity wasn't there and I have no explanation for that because she could have done anything and everything. On the positive side, she brought a whole new way of looking at the political world."
Prof. CLARKSON, with whom she collaborated on Trudeau and Our Times, a two-volume study of the late prime minister, said she "had a novelist's intuition," which she applied to political actors instead of imagined characters in a fictional plot. "She could understand their motivation, their psychology and where they came from," he said, explaining that when they did joint interviews, "she would come out understanding the person and I would come out knowing the issues."
Christina McCALL was the daughter of civil servant Christopher Warnock McCALL and Orlie Alma (FREEMAN,) a registered nurse he had married after the death of his first wife. Christina grew up with an older half-brother, Sam, an older sister, Orlie and a younger brother, Brian. She graduated from Jarvis Collegiate in Toronto at 17 and spent that summer working at Maclean's magazine to help earn her tuition at Victoria College in the University of Toronto.
Northrop FRYE was a tremendous influence and she "always talked about his lectures as the intellectual highlight of her life," according to Mr. NEWMAN. She wanted to go on to do graduate work, according to Prof. CLARKSON, but money was scarce. So, after graduating with an honours degree in 1956, she returned as an editorial assistant to Maclean's, which was then under the editorship of Ralph Allan.
He became the second major influence in her life as a writer. "He wasn't religious, but he had all the advantages of believing in goodness and practising it, which is rare for editors," said Mr. NEWMAN. "He was our role model and we became his Disciples and tried to emulate his qualities." Ms. McCALL's first book, Ralph Allan: The Man from Oxbow (1967), was an anthology she edited as a tribute to the legendary magazine editor.
It was at Maclean's that she met Mr. NEWMAN. " She was very junior," he said, "but I was blown away by her ability," not to mention her allure. "Beauty and intelligence are a potent combination and she had both in spades." They fell in love, but he was already married.
She shifted to Chatelaine magazine. "She came to me in the late 1950s," said Doris ANDERSON, then editor of Chatelaine. "She was wonderful," said Ms. ANDERSON. " She was a great writer, very insightful with an original eye and she used the language with great skill and grace." Ms. McCALL had two other qualities that appealed to Ms. ANDERSON: She generated lots of ideas for the magazine and underneath her demure appearance she was a dedicated feminist.
She was also a woman in love. After Mr. NEWMAN divorced, they married in October of 1959. Shortly afterward, they moved to Ottawa, where Mr. NEWMAN became Ottawa editor of Maclean's. These were the years when he was writing his book Renegade in Power: The Diefenbaker Years with her help and she was beginning her study of Lester Pearson and the Liberal Party.
Asked if she chose the Liberals because he was already working on the Progressive Conservatives, Mr. NEWMAN said no. "Any good journalist in this country knows the Liberals are a natural subject because they are such a force in this country. What gives them such continuity and strength? Analyzing that is the prime ambition of every political journalist." Besides, "the people who ran that party were our Friends and contacts."
The NEWMAN / McCALL marriage collapsed in the early 1970s. They divorced in 1977. By that time, they had long since returned to Toronto. Ms. McCALL had worked as a freelance writer and as a contributing editor and writer to Saturday Night and Maclean's.
She had also become friendly with Prof. CLARKSON. He knew her first through her writing, which he admired for its depth, insights and authority. "You believed what she wrote," he said, "because you knew she had thought about it and often her perceptions were novel."
Prof. CLARKSON and his broadcaster wife, Adrienne CLARKSON, now the Governor-General, split up in 1973. Some time later, he invited Ms. McCALL, who was then working as a national reporter for The Globe and Mail, to have lunch to discuss the federal election of 1974. He asked her to dinner a year later and they gradually began a relationship.
They were married in 1978, bought a new home "to start afresh" with the respective children from their first marriages. "We were the operative parents," Prof. CLARKSON said simply. Later, he and Ms. McCALL adopted each other's daughters. "It was the symbolism of being one family rather than a split family," he said. That tight arrangement led to painful estrangements from the other biological parents -- Mr. NEWMAN and Ms. CLARKSON -- that were only resolved after the passage of time and the birth of grandchildren.
Grits: An Intimate Portrait of the Liberal Party was finally published in 1982. It was dedicated "with love and admiration" to Stephen Hugh Elliott CLARKSON. The book, which caused a sensation, was unlike most political writing at the time. It was a biography of a party, not a person, but it was written as a series of profiles of key figures (Keith Davey, Pierre Trudeau, Jim Coutts, Michael Pitfield, John Turner and Marc Lalonde) from the Pearson years through the Trudeau era.
"Grits is not only a brilliant portrait of how an arthritic party, drenched in scandal, suddenly learned to dance again, but also a textbook on how easily a bunch of young political junkies could take over a party," said historian John ENGLISH. "It endures as one of the finest analyses of Canadian politics ever written." Journalist Robert FULFORD, who picked up Grits again after he heard about Ms. McCALL's death, said: "It is still fresh and full of terrific insights into the politics of the 1960s and 1970s."
Besides forging a tight family unit, Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON decided to collaborate as authors, she bringing her writing talent and political insights and he contributing his organizational skills and policy analysis to their study of Trudeau, which won the Governor-General's award for volume one, The Magnificent Obsession in 1990. Prof. CLARKSON said the process was agonizing because her method was to start with the introduction and polish it before moving on, an approach he thought akin to "building the front door before you've got the basement foundations in."
They wrote every sentence sitting side by side at the same keyboard. Every few pages, they would "print out" and "haggle" over the punctuation and the wording. "It was very, very slow," he said. Even he can't remember who actually wrote of Mr. Trudeau, "He haunts us still," saying that their editor Doug GIBSON at McClelland & Stewart also had a role in shaping the iconic sentence. Mr. GIBSON recalls that they had written, "He still haunts us," and he shifted the emphasis by moving the second word to the end of the sentence.
Writing wasn't the only agony that Ms. McCALL and Prof. CLARKSON shared. For most of their marriage, she was in severe physical pain and he was the gentle and loving caregiver. "In the mid-1970s, she had back pain and then arthritis, but the serious illnesses began in 1993," he said, "when she was diagnosed with diabetes, followed by breast cancer four years later." It wasn't so much the malignancy, but the treatment that caused many of her subsequent health problems.
The surgeon cut her brachial nerve during an operation to remove the tumour in her breast, leaving her left shoulder, arm and hand in chronic pain. "She was a very classy, elegant woman and writer," said broadcaster Eleanor WACHTEL, who became a friend in the late 1990s, "but she was also very private."
Ms. McCALL didn't want anybody to know that she had breast cancer, and didn't want to be seen looking frail and ill. Ms. McCALL's world shrank and she saw fewer and fewer people as her illnesses progressed. Managing her pain grew harder, although she continued to help her friend Rosemary SPEIRS strategize for the Equal Voice website (a movement to increase the number of women in elected office in Canada). The real downhill journey began about a year ago when she could no longer be cared for at home. Until almost the end, though, say the few Friends who visited her, she was a very astute, very witty and very engaging conversationalist.
It was a rough and frustrating passage for the woman many considered the best political writer and analyst of her generation.
Christina McCALL was born in Toronto on January 29, 1935. She died in Toronto of cancer on Wednesday. She was 70. She is survived by her husband, Stephen CLARKSON, three children and their families.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-03 published
James Frederick HICKLING
By Sara HICKLING, Thursday, November 3, 2005, Page A24
Psychologist, management consultant. Born February 20, 1921, in Welland, Ontario Died May 21 in Toronto of natural causes, aged 84.
Who would have thought that a poor boy from Depression-era Toronto would have such an adventurous life? Jim was a self-made man, a pioneer in his work and an unabashed lover of life. If you had told him when he was young that he would not only see the world, but also live in such far-away places as Africa and Indonesia, it would have been beyond his wildest dreams.
Jim grew up in east-end Toronto long before it became fashionable Riverdale. His father died when he was 7 and left his mother and two siblings to soldier on during the Depression. To make ends meet, my grandmother ran a boarding house in their small home on Logan Avenue. Some of my father's earliest memories were of sharing the dinner table with characters as diverse as an evangelical minister and a founding member of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. It made for lively dinner conversation and gave my father a broad view of the world that stayed with him forever.
He was by all accounts an enterprising young boy who managed multiple paper routes and delegated delivery to his somewhat reluctant younger brother. This was a sign of things to come, as Jim was always a big-picture person who delegated the detail whenever possible.
Education was my grandmother's mantra and in 1939, aided by a church scholarship, my father entered Victoria College at the University of Toronto. There he met my mother, then Ruth E. SMITH, whom he described as the smartest and most beautiful girl in the class. Somehow he managed to persuade her to pay for their first date to a tea dance and they were together for the next 60 years until her death in 1999.
In 1944, Jim joined the Irish Regiment of Canada as an infantry officer. He served in the Italian campaign and was in the Netherlands on the day the war ended. Most of his war stories involved card games where drunken soldiers had "lost their shirts" but occasionally you could tell that he had seen many young men die around him and that the experience had been profound.
After the war, Jim considered every day "a bonus." He completed his master's degree in psychology and set up his own career placement business in 1952. At the time, the field of industrial psychology and executive placement was virtually unknown in Canada. His early work involved psychological profiles and testing to match individuals to a suitable career. A few years ago, I was surprised to hear a discussion on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio between Peter GZOWSKI and Robert FULFORD about how they had been tested or "Hickled," as they called it, by my father in their early days at publisher Maclean Hunter Ltd.
Jim went on to set up many international consulting companies that operated in countries throughout the developing world. He consulted in Malaysia, Nigeria, Indonesia, Burma (now Myanmar), Thailand and Britain, just to name a few. His goal was to see every country on Earth and at the age of 80, after recovering from a serious operation, he went by himself to most of the places he had never seen.
At home, Jim was surrounded by women: my mom and his three daughters. Our mother was his muse and no important decision was ever made without her advice. My Dad loved to quote a line from Patrick Dennis's Auntie Mame that summarized his view of the world: "Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death."
Jim was never starving or even hungry where life was concerned. He filled his 84-plus years with more experiences than most people will ever know. His zest for life is a lesson to us all.
Sara is Jim's daughter.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-09 published
Beland HONDERICH, Newspaper Publisher (1918-2005)
Micromanager changed the Toronto Star from a scoop-an-edition news sheet into an information-based vehicle for an emerging middle class, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, Page S9
An outsider who joined the Toronto Star as a "wartime replacement," Beland (Bee) HONDERICH worked his way up through the newsroom to become editor, publisher and ultimately chairman of the board of the country's largest and most colourful city newspaper. Its archives can boast staff bylines belonging to Ernest Hemingway (he likened it to "serving in the Prussian army under a bad general"), Pierre Berton, Gordon Sinclair and Peter Newman.
A micromanager and a curmudgeon who was feared more than he was loved, he transformed and modernized the Star, built a legendary newsroom in the late 1950s and 1960s, fought and won a newspaper war with the now defunct Toronto Telegram, bought up its circulation lists and its fleet of community newspapers, crusaded in support of diversity, national unity and cultural nationalism, and acquired Harlequin Enterprises, for many years a substantial cash cow for Torstar Corp.
"He took a paper that mattered and turned it into a great newspaper. I think his impact on Canadian journalism and his craft was huge," said his son, John HONDERICH, himself a former editor and publisher of the Toronto Star and now a member of the board of directors of Torstar Corp.
He was hard to love, but easy to respect, said Peter NEWMAN, editor-in-chief from 1969 to 1971. "I was always impressed by his wisdom, his determination and his optimistic view of the Canadian future. Unlike most publishers, his ideology went way beyond the bottom line. He never really understood the Canada that stretched beyond the shadow of the C.N. Tower, but he loved the idea of this country."
Beland (Bee) Hugh HONDERICH was born in Baden (near Kitchener,) Ontario, one of six children of John William HONDERICH, a Mennonite postmaster and railway agent, and Rae Laura (ARMSTRONG,) a Presbyterian. Religion was a contentious and omnipresent factor, according to Mr. HONDERICH's youngest brother, philosopher Edgar (Ted) HONDERICH. His father liked unusual names. He called his eldest son Loine and he named his second son after a physician named Béland in Montreal.
During the Depression, the family home was sold at auction when the mortgage holder foreclosed. Beland left school after Grade 8 to help support the family and began working as the Baden correspondent for the Kitchener Record (now The Record) in 1935 at the age of 17.
He did well covering two big fires in his community and made the move to the Toronto Star as a wartime replacement in 1943, earning $35 a week. He had been rejected from the armed forces because he had poor eyesight and a bad ear. When he got to the Star, he was told "all the good men were away fighting" and warned that there wouldn't be a job for him when they came back.
Shy, private, and insecure -- the poorly educated country man in the big city -- he "always felt he had to work twice as hard," according to his son, John.
Mr. HONDERICH told the journalist Doug (now George) FETHERLING in a 1983 interview for Saturday Night magazine that "you produced or else," explaining that he covered two speeches a day, delivering a few facts and a couple of "punchy" quotes. "It left a deep impression on my mind... what people are interested in is information." This was a lesson he would apply when he had control of the paper.
Far from being dismissed when peace was declared, he was promoted to financial editor in 1945, named editor-in-chief a decade later and elected a director of the company in 1957.
The Toronto Star is a private business like other newspapers in Canada, but it is unusual in that it is owned by a group of families and it operates according to a set of principles established by the late Joseph ATKINSON Sr. He became editor in 1899, quickly turned the struggling newspaper around and soon acquired a controlling interest. In 1911, Harry C. HINDMARSH joined the paper. He became Mr. ATKINSON's lieutenant and his son-in-law. Together, they turned the newspaper into the home of "razzle-dazzle journalism," ordering saturation coverage of big stories and indulging in huge headlines, full-page pictures and wacky stunts. They also supported the Liberal Party and social-welfare issues such as mothers' allowances, unemployment insurance, old-age pensions, minimum wages and the rights of labour unions. The combination of Christian piety, free-wheeling Fabian socialism and popular journalism was good for circulation and advertising revenues. By 1913, the Star was Toronto's largest paper and Mr. ATKINSON was its controlling shareholder.
He died in 1948, leaving an estate of more than $8-million, putting the bulk of it, including the ownership of the paper, into the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, which he had established six years earlier. In his will, he directed that profits from the paper's operations were "for the promotion and maintenance of social, scientific and economic reforms which are charitable in nature, for the benefit of the people of the province of Ontario" and he stipulated that the paper could be sold only to people who shared his social views.
Mr. HINDMARSH became president of the five-person board established to govern the paper and carry out Mr. ATKINSON's wishes. However, the Ontario government, led by Conservative Leslie FROST, and rival newspapers, including The Globe and Mail and The Toronto Telegram, argued that the foundation was merely a device to avoid paying succession duties on Mr. ATKINSON's estate.
The FROST government passed a law forbidding charitable foundations from owning more than 10 per cent of a profit-making business. The Star was given seven years to sell its business interests, with the foundation's trustees, officers and directors allowed to buy them, subject to the approval of the Supreme Court of Canada.
While this wrangling was going on, Mr. HINDMARSH dropped dead of a heart attack on December 20, 1956. The new board of the Atkinson Foundation was made up of Joseph S. ATKINSON (son of the late Mr. ATKINSON,) his sister Ruth HINDMARSH (widow of Mr. HINDMARSH), Burnett THALL, William J. CAMPBELL and Mr. HONDERICH.
In 1958, after swearing before the Supreme Court that they would uphold the principles outlined in Mr. ATKINSON's will, they were allowed to buy the newspaper. They paid $25.5-million in a leveraged buyout, which Globe business columnist Eric REGULY has called "the steal of the century." They put down $1-million in cash and secured most of the rest by selling debt and preferred shares to the public.
Mr. HONDERICH, who had been editor for three years and on the board for one, had no family money or other resources to draw upon. He was living in a duplex with his wife and three children. "We had one couch and one chair," said his son John. "The Bank of Commerce virtually put up all the money, but the security was the shares of the largest newspaper in the country."
In addition, Mr. HONDERICH took a personal loan for his 15-per-cent share, helped by advice and references from accountant, cultural nationalist and later politician, Walter GORDON. Today, Torstar Corp., the media conglomerate that owns the Star, is worth about $1.7-billion.
As editor and then publisher, Mr. HONDERICH built the great Toronto Star newsroom of the late 1950s and 1960s. He transformed the paper from a flashy, scoop-an-edition news sheet into an information-based vehicle for columnists and critics. He quickly realized, according to journalist Val SEARS, that the real market in the postwar period lay in finding readers among the young middle class in the suburbs who were moving up through the social strata.
They wanted context and information, not just headlines. Ron HAGGART worked as a columnist for the Star in the sixties. Mr. HONDERICH had the right ideas about how to change the Star, which was a stodgy, old-fashioned paper, according to Mr. HAGGART. "It was still a paper that believed the most recent event deserved a headline because it had happened in the last hour."
Among the stable of writers and editors Mr. HONDERICH enlisted or celebrated were: Pierre Berton as a daily columnist, Charles Templeton as managing editor, Nathan Cohen as drama critic, Milt Dunnell on sports, Gwyn (Jocko) Thomas on crime and Peter NEWMAN as Ottawa editor and editor-in-chief.
He loved to hire people, said journalist Robert FULFORD, who worked for the Star twice (from 1958 to 1962 and from 1964 to 1968), but he quickly grew bored with them. Managing editors were a notoriously endangered species, according to Mr. FULFORD, who once joked that after more than two years on the job, managing editors took on the look of "hunted animals." When he was having trouble sleeping at night, police reporter Jocko Thomas was said to recite the names of the more than 40 city editors who served during his long career at the paper.
Mr. NEWMAN spent seven years at the Star, leaving in 1971 in "frustration because [Mr. HONDERICH] was always stone-cold certain about what he didn't want, but not good at suggesting practical options."
He could be a bully. "He wasn't a particularly big man, but he looked big to his employees. He tended to tower," said Mr. SEARS, who worked for Mr. HONDERICH for about 25 years in a number of capacities, including Ottawa bureau chief and Washington correspondent. "He spoke low, but he made his position very clear. On the other hand, he was certainly the best publisher I ever worked for because he knew what he wanted and he would back you up."
Saying that he and Mr. HONDERICH fought a lot, especially when he was editor of the editorial page, Mr. SEARS said he always thought it was a mistake to try to outguess his boss. Mr. HONDERICH seemed aware of his power. "He once said to me, 'If I walk through that newsroom and I say to someone it is a nice day, by the final edition I have two full pages on the weather," said Mr. SEARS.
Stories abound about Mr. HONDERICH's tendency to micromanage. When he was editor, he behaved as though he was the publisher and when he became publisher and president in 1966, "he acted as though he owned the paper outright," Mr. FULFORD said.
Staffers were obsessed with anticipating his wishes, often with bizarre results. Somebody heard that "Bee" believed that a colour photograph had to have red in it, so Star photographers took to stowing red jackets in their cars and asking people to put them on before snapping their pictures, or so the story goes.
"Bee had a phobia about accompanying each picture in his paper with explanatory cutlines," recalled Mr. NEWMAN. "I got hell once for running an illustration of Gina Lollobrigida, the Italian film star, standing beside a male dwarf, because I had left out the 'left' and 'right' identifications."
During his years at the newspaper, Mr. HONDERICH oversaw the introduction of colour, the shift from an afternoon to a morning paper, a Sunday edition and the appointment of the first ombudsman at any paper in Canada. He was also a driving force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council. In 1976, he was appointed chairman and chief executive officer of Torstar Corp. He continued to serve as publisher until September, 1988.
Mr. HONDERICH married three times. His and his first wife Florence divorced in 1962. He married Agnes KING in 1968. Star legend has it that he called the paper from the airport as he and his bride were leaving on their honeymoon and asked for the front page to be read to him. She died of cancer in 1999 after a long and painful illness. "He was amazingly diligent in the way he cared for her," said his son John.
That same year he became engaged to Rina WHELAN, a widow he had met many years before (when both were married to other people) in the barbershop of the Hotel Vancouver, where she worked as a manicurist. "This is one of the great love stories," John HONDERICH said, "I have had the honour of standing up for him at two of his three weddings."
The HONDERICHs lived in the penthouse of La Carina (Rina's House,) a condominium she had developed and built on English Bay. "He was a wealthy man and she was a wealthy woman," commented Mr. HONDERICH's brother Ted, "and so both were under suspicion of being gold diggers."
Mr. HONDERICH became more left wing in his politics as he became older, said his brother. "All newspaper publishers are accused of being ruthless, but actually they are activists," he said. "They want to make things happen and they don't like things hanging on in an indecisive way."
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born on November 25, 1918, in Baden, Ontario. He died yesterday in St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver after a massive stroke. He was 86. He is survived by his first wife Florence, his third wife Rina, three children, six grandchildren and one brother.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-14 published
McLEISH, A. Don
Suddenly, at the Trillium Health Centre - Mississauga on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 at the age of 75. Loving husband of Molly for 53 years. Devoted uncle of Stewart and Penny JOHNSTON, Mike and Sue JOHNSTON, Penny and Steve POGSON, Kathy and Wayne FULFORD, and Greg and Anne McCRACKEN. Devoted grand-uncle to Michelle, Patrick, Heather, Doyle, Janice, Joseph, Shawn, Krista, Corey, Daniel and Cayla. Don was a successful businessman in the Toronto area for many years. He was always supportive of his business associates, his staff, and the A.I.C.C. (an industry association). During his retirement, Don enjoyed his Friends at the Etobicoke Lawn Bowling Club and was an active volunteer with Etobicoke Meals on Wheels. Over the years Don supported many charities. His most recent favourite charities were the Dorothy Ley Hospice and the Scleroderma Society. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday, January 17, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. For those who wish, donations may be made to a charity of your choice. Beautiful memories Are wonderful things, They last till the longest day, They never wear out, They never get lost, And can never be given away. To some you may be forgotten, To others a part of the past. But to us who loved and lost you, Your memory will always last.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-17 published
McLEISH, A. Don
Suddenly, at the Trillium Health Centre - Mississauga on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 at the age of 75. Loving husband of Molly for 53 years. Devoted uncle of Stewart and Penny JOHNSTON, Mike and Sue JOHNSTON, Paul JOHNSTON, Penny and Steve POGSON, Kathy and Wayne FULFORD, and Greg and Anne McCRACKEN. Devoted grand-uncle to Michelle, Patrick, Heather, Doyle, Janice, Joseph, Shawn, Krista, Corey, Daniel, Cayla, Sarah and Elise. Don was a successful businessman in the Toronto area for many years. He was always supportive of his business associates, his staff, and the A.I.C.C. (an industry association). During his retirement, Don enjoyed his Friends at the Etobicoke Lawn Bowling Club and was an active volunteer with Etobicoke Meals on Wheels. Over the years Don supported many charities. His most recent favourite charities were the Dorothy Ley Hospice and the Scleroderma Society. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday, January 17, 2005 at 10: 30 a.m. For those who wish, donations may be made to a charity of your choice. Beautiful memories Are wonderful things, They last till the longest day, They never wear out, They never get lost, And can never be given away. To some you may be forgotten, To others a part of the past. But to us who loved and lost you, Your memory will always last.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-24 published
FULFORD, Iris
Peacefully at York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 in her 94th year. Loving sister of Susan RUSSELL and her husband Jack. Dear aunt of John and Laura RUSSELL, Robert and Karen RUSSELL, Shelley and Robert MILFORD, Kevin and Valerie RUSSELL, and their families. At the request of Iris, private funeral arrangements have been made. Cremation.

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-03 published
STONE, Myrtle May
At the Douglas Memorial Hospital on Saturday, July 30, 2005. Myrtle is survived by her daughters Linda FULFORD and Judy (Russell) BARKER, her sisters Helen CLARK and Eleanore KIRK, her grandchildren Michael and Lisa FULFORD and Marny and Doug PAGET and also by one great-great-grand_son Garrit. Private funeral arrangements with interment at Glendale Memorial Gardens were entrusted to The Williams Funeral Home in Ridgeway. www.williamsfuneralhome.ca

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FULFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-19 published
LAVERGNE, Marie (née DUGGAN)
Peacefully with her family at her side on Thursday, November 17, 2005 in her 83rd year, at Aurora Resthaven. Marie, loving mother of Jeanne and her husband Gary SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER; Christine and her husband Marty KITTAKA; and predeceased by her son Jean Pierre LAVERGNE. Grandma Marie will be lovingly remembered by Jennifer and her husband Bill LYNCH, Pamela SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, and Max KITTAKA. Dear sister of Theresa DUGGAN, Adrienne HINDS, Patricia and Wayne FULFORD, Annette BODI, Michael and Marion DUGGAN, and special aunt and great aunt Marie to many nieces and nephew. Special thanks to Marcy, the nurses, staff and Dr. Smith at Aurora Resthaven for their Friendship, kindness and wonderful care. Friends may call at the Thompson Funeral Home, 530 Industrial Parkway South (northeast corner of Yonge St. and Industrial Pkwy. S.) Aurora (905-727-5421) from 7-9 p.m. Saturday and 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Mass on Monday morning at 10 a.m. in Our Lady of Grace Church (Yonge, north of Wellington). Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Covenant House would be appreciated.

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FULGENCIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-07 published
FULGENCIO, Emmanuel " Manny"
Suddenly passed away at home on Wednesday, May 4, 2005 in Mississauga at the age of 46. Beloved husband of Maribel. Devoted father of Joseph. Dear son of Manuel and Yolanda. He will be sadly missed by sister Mildred and brothers Sam and Joel. Manny will also be fondly remembered by nephews Sean and Giocomo and nieces Kimberly and Ashley. The family will receive Friends at the Glen Oaks Memorial Chapel and Reception Centre, 3164 Ninth Line (at Dundas) Oakville (905-257-8822) on Sunday, May 8 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held in the Glen Oaks Chapel on Monday May 9, 2005 at 11 a.m. Burial to follow at Glen Oaks Memorial Gardens.

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FULKER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-18 published
FULKER, Harold H.
It is with great sadness the family of Harold H. FULKER, regretfully announce his sudden passing on September 16, 2005, in his 84th year. Beloved husband of 59 years to Mary. Much loved father of Stella (Darius) SALMON and Annmarie (Mike) MATUZIC. Adored Pop-Pop of Leah (Reno) PISANO; Melissa (David) NAGLE; Connor, Cody and Sophia MATUZIC; Tavoy, Trishoy and Ann-Marr SALMON. He will also be sadly missed by his great-grandchildren Jake, Julia and Evan, his brother Claude, sisters Eileen and Dolly, and also survived by several nieces and nephews in England and Spain. Predeceased by his parents Agnes and Arthur FULKER, brother Arthur and sister Winnifred and sisters-in-law Betty and Doris. Originally from England in 1950's Harold and Mary moved to Canada to raise their family. Harold will be fondly remembered for his zest for life and love of travel as he and Mary enjoyed many adventures. The family will receive visitors at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, London, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be conducted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Woodland Cemetery. The family would like to thank the Byron Medical Centre and Dr. EBERHARD who provided exceptional care over many years. In lieu of flowers those wishing to make a donation in memory of Harold are asked to consider the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation. "Those whom we love live within our hearts and become a part of all that we are, forever".

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FULKER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-10-01 published
FULKER, Harold
The family of the late Harold FULKER wishes to express their heartfelt gratitude to family, Friends and neighbours for their support and kindness during the recent loss of our beloved husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. A special thank you to Dr. EBERHARD, Dr. WINTERBURN and staff for their care over the years, and to the police officers and London Health Sciences Centre staff who attended to Harold and supported us during our loss. Our sincerest appreciation to Reverend Sid SMITHSON for his touching service and to the staff at Westview Funeral Chapel for their compassionate assistance. Thank you for the flowers, cards and memorial donations. Your thoughtfulness will always be remembered. Sincerely, Mary FULKER, and daughters Stella SALMON, Annmarie MATUZIC and families.

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FULLARD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-28 published
McINTYRE, Michael Terrence
Suddenly at London Health Sciences Centre, University Campus, on Saturday, March 26, 2005 Michael Terrence McINTYRE of Lucan, age 71 years. Beloved husband of Margo (ETUE.) Dear father of Kathleen (Dan) of London, Michael (Sandy) of Windsor, Jeff (Maureen) of Stratford, Jerome (Elyn) of Whitehorse, Y.T. and Deana of London. Loving grandfather of Chantelle, Daniel, Aliena, Derek, Caitlin, Darby, Breda and Julianna. Brother of Mrs. Margaret CROSBY of Toronto. Brother-in-law of Elaine and Bill VAN OOYEN and Rose MacDONALD. Predeceased by his brother Dan and Joseph McINTYRE and his sister Anne FULLARD. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Wednesday evening from 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass at St. Patricks Church, Lucan, on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment in St. Peter's Cemetery, London. Prayers Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock. Donations to Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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FULLARD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-01 published
FULLARD, Liselotte " Lisa"
Peacefully at Parkwood Hospital on Saturday, April 30, 2005 Liselotte (Lisa,) beloved wife of the late Anson FULLARD. Loving mother of Maureen FULLARD of London, David FULLARD and his wife Judy of Niagara Falls, Peter FULLARD and his wife Michelle of Ottawa and Chris FULLARD and his wife Annette of London. Cherished grandmother of Jennifer, Gregory, Andrew and Braden. Dear sister of Gertrude KREBS (John) of West Lorne. Sister-in-law of Inge STERBA of Austria. Dear aunt of Petra, Ushi, Martin and Cathy. Predeceased by her brother Herwig STERBA and by her nephew Tony KREBS. A special thank you to the staff of 3A east at Parkwood Hospital and spiritual advisor Sharon BARRICK. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Monday evening from 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass at Mary Immaculate Church, 1980 Trafalgar Street on Tuesday at 11 a.m. Cremation with interment in St. Peter's Cemetery. Donations to Arthritis Society or Parkwood Hospital would be appreciated.

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FUL surnames continued to 05ful002.htm