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"CSA" 2005 Obituary


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CSABA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-04 published
Patrick CARDY, Composer and Teacher: 1953-2005
Open-minded, all-embracing Ottawa musician was known for bridging gaps in an area of the arts that is often strongly divided. For him, it was all about communicating with his audience
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, May 4, 2005, Page S7
Ottawa -- During a career that saw him receive more than 40 commissions from performers and institutions, including acclaimed Canadian concert pianist Angela Hewitt and Ottawa's National Arts Centre Orchestra, Patrick CARDY rarely separated himself from those who hired him to compose music.
"Patrick dispelled the stereotype of composers as introverted and dour and who do their own thing. He was always enthusiastic to work with us, and about the process of working with us," says Peter DUSCHENES, artistic director for the Platypus Theatre in Ottawa.
In 2001, Mr. CARDY was commissioned by the National Arts Centre Orchestra to co-write music for Rhythm in Your Rubbish, a Platypus Theatre production that told the story of two tramps who discover the beauty of music.
As was usually the case, Mr. CARDY took on the project with great enthusiasm, attending workshops and rehearsals, where he collaborated with actors and the director to make the music and story work well together. "He was a fantastic collaborator who was so willing to jump into the process of creating," says Mr. DUSCHENES.
Others to commission Mr. CARDY include the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, the Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Vancouver Orchestra, the Vancouver Chamber Music Festival and Thirteen Strings. In addition to Ms. HEWITT, he wrote for soprano Julie NESRALLAH, flautists Robert CRAM and Jean-Guy BRAULT, and for the violin/viola duo of Jerry and Janos CSABA, who premiered his Mimesis on the National Arts Centre's Music for a Sunday Afternoon series in 1988.
Often, his support and interest in those who commissioned him did not end once his music was put to paper: When Rhythm in Your Rubbish toured Ontario, Mr. CARDY attended performances in many cities, including Kitchener, and Toronto, where the Toronto Symphony performed his score. He would often have a beer with musicians after a performance to ask how they enjoyed playing his music and to determine if revisions were necessary. Anyone who is familiar with his compositions says his music is characterized by colourful, evocative sonorities, a strong sense of dramatic gesture, an elegant lyricism and an accessible directness of expression -- traits that have captivated both listeners and performers.
Mr. CARDY's work ranged from pieces for children's theatre to liturgical music. He was just as likely to be inspired by the music of a Renaissance composer, as he was to experiment with synthetic musical scales. A Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Records disc of his work Virelai, for clarinet and string orchestra, was nominated for a Juno award in the Best Classical Composition category in 1992, and another Canadian Broadcasting Corporation disc including his Éclat for Organ, was named Best Classical Recording at the 1999 East Coast Music Awards.
Mr. CARDY, who was also a flutist and teacher, was in demand as a guest lecturer and music adjudicator Canadawide, and often visited area high schools to encourage students to consider music as a career. In 1977, he became a professor in music composition and theory at Carleton University's School for Studies in Art and Culture, where he was known as an attentive and creative teacher.
Mr. CARDY was president of the Canadian League of Composers from 1989 to 1993, and was on the Canadian League of Composers's executive council for many years, during which he was "well spoken on issues of concern to Canadian composers and very generous with his time and advice," says Canadian League of Composers president John BURGE of Toronto.
While president, he used his close proximity to the Canada Council's Ottawa office to work on a number of items, including trying to increase the amount of Canadian music performed by Canadian orchestras, says Mr. BURGE. He also oversaw the highly successful 40th-anniversary celebrations of the Canadian League of Composers in Winnipeg in 1991.
"He cared deeply about our country and wanted us all to appreciate the wealth of our musical heritage and to provide opportunities for current and future composers," says Mr. BURGE.
On March 11, the Ottawa Chamber Music Society performed a tribute concert to Mr. CARDY's work at a local church. The concert was recorded by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to be broadcast later across Canada. "It was a beautiful event," says the society's artistic director, Julian ARMOUR, noting that the society on 29 different occasions used the composer's work in its performances. The March concert included pieces written for his two children. It began with CARDY's Hope, a short, sweet piece for strings dedicated to son Michael, and also included Quips and Cranks dedicated to son Jonathan.
"He wrote music to be played and listened to," says Mr. ARMOUR. "He loved the reaction of audiences and that his music brought out strong emotions."
With his open-minded approach, Mr. CARDY, who was a devout Catholic, was known to bridge gaps in an industry that is often strongly divided. "These days there is an extremely wide spectrum of music and few composers have respect for the whole spectrum, but Patrick brought people together and he always fostered respect for what others were doing.
"He was a great, positive and healthy force in the Canadian music industry."
When he was not composing, Mr. CARDY loved to play sports and keep fit, says close friend Al MacKEY, who had known Mr. CARDY and his wife, Janet, for 20 years.
"He was a passionate debater who liked to take opposing views and provoke his Friends on just about any subject," says Mr. MacKEY, who remembers his friend as an enthusiastic curler and softball player, and a huge hockey fan who never missed his son Jonathan's games and practices.
In 1996, Mr. CARDY served as music adviser to the National Arts Centre Orchestra for its new music festival, A Tonal Departure, and more recently was a consultant on the National Arts Centre New Music Program. Over the years, he wrote a handful of pieces of chamber music for both the orchestra and its musicians and was active in suggesting new music the orchestra should add to its concert series.
"One of his roles was to serve as the voice of conscience for the National Arts Centre Orchestra in our new music program," says Christopher DEACON, the orchestra's managing director. "He gave us guidance; there was ongoing dialogue and if he felt we were not doing enough, he would nip at our heels."
Andrew CARDY was a patient collaborator, says Mr. DEACON. "He would not just say 'here is a proposal,' he would give me a very elaborate range of options. They were always very thoughtful options and he was very responsive to what we had to say."
Like the 18th-century composer Joseph Haydn, Mr. CARDY signed all his compositions with the Latin Deo gratias -- thanks be to God.
Patrick CARDY was born August 22, 1953, in Toronto. He died of a heart attack March 24 in Ottawa, after being treated for a broken arm suffered while curling. He was 51. He is survived by his wife, Janet, and two sons, Michael, 7, and Jonathan, 11. On the night he died, the National Arts Centre Orchestra dedicated its performance to him.

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CSAKY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-09 published
CSAKY, George Michel
Beloved husband of Charlotte, died suddenly at his home in Oshawa on June 7, 2005 at the age of 80. A soft spoken generous man he made Friends both in the Hungarian community and among Canadians during his long tenure at the General Motors Plant in Oshawa. He was Titular head of the Csaky Clan whose members reside on 3 continents. Requiem Mass will be at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, 432 Sheppard Ave. East, Toronto on Saturday, June 11th at 11 a.m. George Csaky chose to be cremated; his ashes will be taken to his ancestrol home and placed in the family crypt at Szepesmindszent (now Slovakia).

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CSAKY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-24 published
CSAKY, Charlotte (née KEERI- SZANTO)
Beloved recently widowed wife of George, mother of Christina died November 20, 2005 after a brave battle with cancer in her 75th year. Sari lived life to the fullest and will be sorely missed by her family and Friends. A Requiem Mass will be held on Saturday, November 26, 2005 at 11 a.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, 432 Sheppard Avenue East. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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CSASZAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-21 published
PEART, Douglas Russell
Queen's Commerce '39
University of Toronto, Doctor of Health Administration '51
Peacefully at home on Monday, June 20, 2005, after a long and happy life at the age of 88. Dear husband and best friend of Helen (née DANIELS) after 60 years of marriage. Proud father of John (Brenda,) Grant (Linda,) Mary DEVITT (Richard,) Sandra FREEMAN (John) all of Ottawa, and Susan Peart CSASZAR (Elmer CSASZAR) of Toronto. Also survived by five grandchildren: Peter, Emily and Graham DEVITT of Ottawa, and John and Elizabeth CSASZAR of Toronto. He also leaves his brother Dr. Arthur PEART (Gwen) of Ottawa, and his sister Muriel PROVERBS (Jinx) of Summerland, British Columbia. In addition to his family, Doug will be missed by many Friends and professional associates.
Former Chief Executive Officer of the Ottawa Civic Hospital from 1954 to 1978, and first non-medical Administrator. Chief Executive Officer of the Port Arthur General Hospital from 1951 to 1954. Served five years during World War 2 with the Canadian Army and discharged with the rank of Captain having served four years overseas. Life Fellow of the Royal Society of Health, and Life Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives. Recipient of the Commemorative Medal recognizing the 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada, and recipient of the Commemorative Medal on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the accession of her Majesty The Queen of the Throne.
Friends may call at the Garden Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 3440 Richmond Road (between Bayshore Drive and Baseline Road), Nepean, on Wednesday, June 22nd from 7 to 9 p.m. and Thursday, June 23rd from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday at 2 p.m. Interment Pinecrest Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Palliative Care Outreach, 1455 Woodroffe Avenue South, Nepean, K2G 1W1 or the charity of your choice would be appreciated. Condolences, tributes or donations may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com.

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CSASZAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-28 published
Douglas R. PEART
By Susan Peart CSASZAR, Monday, November 28, 2005, Page A16
Husband, father, hospital administrator, golfer, optimist. Born December 18, 1916, in Burlington, Ontario Died June 20 in Ottawa of heart and kidney complications, aged 88.
Doug PEART loved talking to people. He not only loved talking he asked questions and remembered the names of everyone he met and what they had to say. His outgoing personality and amazing memory set the path for his successful career and a life with many Friends.
Doug was one of five children of Bessie and Grant PEART. He was born on a farm near Burlington, Ontario, but the family soon moved to Ottawa, where his father worked in the federal agriculture department. Doug went to Queen's University and graduated in 1939 with a bachelor of commerce degree.
After graduation, Doug took a job with Hudson's Bay Co. in Winnipeg. However, within a few months, with the outbreak of the Second World War, he joined the army. With his business degree and organizational ability, he was a natural for the ordnance corps, in charge of making sure supplies, hospital facilities and anything required for the war effort was where it needed to be.
He returned to his parents' home in Ottawa after five years overseas. One day, when he drove his mother to visit a friend, her friend's daughter Helen went out to say hello, having known Doug's younger sister at school. In a matter of a few weeks, Doug and Helen were married, a love affair that lasted 60 years.
Doug started working with the federal government in the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. A few years later, he heard about a new program being started at the University of Toronto, a postgraduate program in hospital administration.
Doug and Helen sold their house in Ottawa, gave up the comfortable government job and moved to Toronto with their first-born, John. The student life was difficult with no money coming in and another son Grant added to the family.
After graduating, Doug, Helen and the two boys moved to Port Arthur, Ontario (now Thunder Bay), where Doug became the chief executive officer of what was then the Port Arthur General Hospital. The family -- now numbering five, Susan having been born in Port Arthur -- moved back to Ottawa in 1954, when Doug was appointed the Chief Executive Officer of the Civic Hospital in Ottawa. He was the first non-medical administrator at that large teaching hospital.
Doug loved his 25 years as Chief Executive Officer of the Ottawa Civic. He said he would have worked for free, it was so much fun. But, with the arrival of two more children, Mary and Sandy, he had a wife and five children to support.
His interest in people defined how he did his job. He knew the names of most of the staff at the hospital and delighted in walking the corridors, having a word with people he saw. On Christmas mornings, even though there were five children at home, Doug would head to the hospital, don a Santa suit and go to the children's ward with a few other members of staff to hand out presents to the children who were in hospital over Christmas.
Doug presided over many changes at the Civic including the opening of the Heart Institute.
After retiring, Doug started a consulting business that allowed him to combine two of his interests: travel and health-care administration. He was active in surveying hospitals across the country for accreditation and was frequently called on by provincial governments to provide expertise for various hospitals.
Doug was very proud of his family. He had a very optimistic nature, but combined his optimism with a belief that perseverance and hard work would help make good things happen.
Susan is Doug's daughter.

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