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"JUN" 2005 Obituary


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JUNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-12 published
NUTT, Ronald Edward
Suddenly, at the Scarborough Centenary Health Centre, on Tuesday, January 11, 2005 at the age of 66. Ron NUTT, beloved husband of Ede. Loving father of Eileen MARGARET (Bob,) and Rhonda JUNE. Grandfather of Trevor, Corey, Tearsa, and Tia. Survived by his mother Eileen PRISLEY and brother John. Ron will be sadly missed by Esther and Freda, and his many family and Friends. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering village) 905-428-8488 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Friday, January 14, 2005, at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Duffin Meadows Cemetery.

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JUNEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-24 published
Harry J. BOYLE, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Broadcaster: Farmer's son from southwestern Ontario shook the soil off his feet to become a radio and television pioneer who shaped Canada's air waves, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, With files from Canadian Press, Monday, January 24, 2005 - Page S6
Broadcaster, playwright, novelist, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation executive and a former Chair of the Canadian and Radio Television Commission, Harry J. BOYLE was a huge influence on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio and television as a programmer, talent spotter (think Wayne and Shuster), broadcast boss and policy maker.
"He helped the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation become the link that held the country together," said novelist and radio producer Howard ENGEL. "The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, in my time [the 1950s-1970s] was like the railway a century earlier. It let people in Corner Brook know what was going on in Edmonton. He was very important that way in his writing and in his broadcasting."
Harry BOYLE was born on a farm in 1915 in southwestern Ontario. After graduating from Wingham High School and St. Jerome's College (now part of the University of Waterloo) he worked as a journalist for the Goderich Signal Star and a stringer for the London Free Press and the Globe and Mail.
He got his first job as a broadcaster in 1936 at Radio Station CKNX in Wingham, Ontario, the town later made famous as the birthplace and literary home of short-story writer Alice MUNRO. He left the radio station in 1941 and worked for a year at the Stratford Beacon-Herald before joining the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a farm commentator in 1942. He quickly rose to become a network supervisor of features and director of the National Farm Radio Forum.
"He literally had an understanding of broadcasting and life from the grass roots up because he was a farmer," said playwright and Toronto cultural maven Mavor MOORE who was a colleague at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio as far back as the 1940s. There were two Canadian programs that were way ahead of every other in the world in terms of the size of their collective audience audiences that would gather in halls and meeting places across the country to listen to radio, according to Mr. MOORE. One of them was the Citizen's Forum and the other was the Farm Forum under Mr. BOYLE's supervision.
"He was a real thinking farmer," said Mr. MOORE, "and a good deal deeper than people expected of the head of the farm dept." Those programs gave him an insight into the importance of broadcasting across the country, an understanding that he used "to turn radio into a medium where difficult and large topics could be tackled," said Mr. MOORE. With his "enquiring mind and his lively concern about big issues in society and communications" he was an "anomaly among the people starting radio and television, who were on the whole pretty low brow," according to Mr. MOORE.
He was an anomaly in other ways, too. A devout Irish Catholic who enjoyed a drink or three, Mr. BOYLE hated hypocrisy, top-down bureaucracies and micro-managing. The legendary broadcaster Max FERGUSON was a staff announcer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the late 1940s. By that time Mr. BOYLE was head of the Trans-Can network.
"I was the lowest paid announcer on staff," Mr. FERGUSON remembered yesterday, "Every year we got an annual increment, although we called it the annual excrement because it was about ten dollars a year." That year -- it was 1949 -- Mr. FERGUSON was told by a functionary that he wasn't going to get a raise at all, even though he was doing Rawhide, his satirical commentary in addition to his regular duties.
In the ensuing blow-up, Mr. FERGUSON either quit or was fired for insubordination, depending on who is telling the story. While Mr. FERGUSON was still seething, along came Mr. BOYLE with the suggestion that he should think about selling Rawhide to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on a freelance basis. "He was like the army sergeant interceding for the privates with the officers, except he did it between the announcers and the producers," said Mr. FERGUSON.
"He sold that Rawhide show to them [the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation]for about five times my salary and I was able to move back to Halifax, which I certainly preferred to Toronto. Things worked out beautifully and I owe it all to Harry BOYLE. He was the only one who would listen to you and go to bat for you with his bosses."
When the Dominion Network was established at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Mr. BOYLE created the feature show Assignment which reflected "homey" local stories from across Canada and his real triumph, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Wednesday Night, a mix of opera, musicals, classical and original plays and even documentaries that ran for 90 minutes or three hours depending on the strength of the program. Until then, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation schedule was divided into rigidly fixed and timed segments. What Mr. BOYLE did, to the delight of both listeners and freelance producers, was to make the process more flexible so that the quality of the program determined the schedule rather than the other way around. This was the era that is known as the "golden age" of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with actors and producers of the ilk of John Drainie and Lister Sinclair fusing listeners to their radios.
"He was the making of me," said retired radio producer Howard ENGEL, only one of many people Mr. BOYLE took a chance on as broadcasters. "I was a high-school teacher and not much enjoying it in the mid-1950s," he said, confessing that after a single pedagogical year in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, he had given it up and moved to Toronto and was looking for work. The two met over a drink at a crowded table in the Evereen, a pub across from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on Jarvis Street, just north of the Celebrity Club, a local watering hole that Mr. BOYLE was known to frequent.
He sent Mr. Engel off with a tape recorder and commissioned him to do a short documentary about the celebration of Chinese New Year in Toronto's Chinatown. "That meant I had to learn how to use a tape recorder, to edit tape and to do a mix," Mr. ENGEL said, confessing that he produced a 45 minute script that he had to boil down to about five minutes. He soon became a tape editor on Assignment with host Bill McNEIL.
Mr. BOYLE made the tape recorder an indispensable tool of broadcasting, said Mr. ENGEL, as essential as a typewriter was for print journalists at the time. In doing so, he ruffled the technicians union. He was in favour of unions, said Mr. ENGEL, but he thought this was new territory and in the same way that you wouldn't impose somebody sitting on the lap of a print journalist writing on a typewriter, he believed broadcast journalists should be allowed to go out and record sounds and voices.
Although Mr. BOYLE had a bad enough drinking problem that he would disappear from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for as much as a week at a time, Mr. ENGEL said he could always re-invent and resurrect both himself and his career with brilliant new programming ideas. "He was a multiple phoenix," said Mr. ENGEL, who was able to save himself by his own invention.
He could arouse envy as well as admiration in other broadcasters. Margaret LYONS, former vice-president English radio services for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, was a senior producer in public affairs and "a competitor for air time" in the 1960s. She remembers Mr. BOYLE as "very independent minded" with no patience for political or any other kind of "correctness." Saying that Mr. BOYLE was a great generalist who always wanted to poke fun at the establishment and against all forms of intellectual pretension, she said he was an iconoclast who gave legitimacy to an irreverence about public life and broadcasting bureaucracy. "His commonsensical approach was a good thing," she concluded.
He was always at loggerheads with the brass above him, said Mr. ENGLE and when he went to Ottawa he found himself in the same situation with his political bosses. In 1968, Mr. BOYLE was appointed vice chairman of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission, the independent public authority that regulates and supervises broadcasting and telecommunications in Canada. He succeeded Pierre JUNEAU as chairman when Mr. JUNEAU resigned in 1975 and was later confirmed to the position in 1976.
A committed nationalist, Mr. BOYLE had a huge influence on the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission and the shaping of the 1968 broadcasting act, according to Joan Irwin a journalist who wrote about the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission for a number of print outlets at the time. 'Harry was better at cutting through crap than anybody I have ever known. He was absolutely real and he could see through anybody -- a terrific guy."
Mr. BOYLE left the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission after a year, having gained a reputation, along with Mr. JUNEAU, of safeguarding domestic ownership of Canada's broadcasting industry and creating a set of Canadian content quotas for television, among other initiatives.
In 1977, Mr. BOYLE presided over a committee of inquiry which examined national broadcasting shortly after the victory of the separatist Parti Quebecois victory in Quebec's 1976 election. The report was critical of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for failing to promote communications among the country's regional and linguistic communities, and expressed concern about the centralization of the system, the lack of programming from regions outside central Canada and the gap between French and English audiences.
Mr. BOYLE was also a newspaper columnist, an essayist, novelist and playwright. His novels, included, A Summer Burning (1964), With a Pinch of Sin (1966), Memories of a Catholic Boyhood (1973) and The Luck of the Irish (1975). His radio and stage plays including Strike, The Macdonalds of Oak Valley and The Inheritance. He won the Stephen Leacock award for humour and the John Drainie award.
Harry J. BOYLE was born on October 7, 1915 in St. Augustine, Ontario He died in Toronto on January 22, 2005. He was 89. He is survived by a son and a daughter.

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JUNEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-26 published
Tribute: Harry J. BOYLE
'A wonderful, creative individual who... produced some of the best programs the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ever did'
By Pierre JUNEAU, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, January 27, 2005 - Page S7
Montreal -- Harry J. BOYLE will be remembered as a creative broadcaster and executive. But I think many people who crossed his path will just think of Harry as a sensitive, genuine person with a great sense of humour, a sharp mind, a flair to perceive talent in people or to detect bluff. While I was vice-chairman of the Board of Broadcast Governors, its chairman, Andrew STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, supported the idea of assembling a small and informal group that would try to come up with new ideas to stimulate and evaluate "Canadian content" in radio and television. While I was searching for names, I happened to meet a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation researcher, Rodrigue CHIASSON, who worked in Toronto. He mentioned Harry's name to me. Coming from Montreal, I had never heard of him.
"I can't think of a better person for what you have in mind," said Rod. "He's just a wonderful, creative individual who has produced some of the best programs the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ever did."
That is how Harry and I came to meet. The group was formed and, besides Harry and Rod, included Patrick WATSON and two or three others.
Later, in 1968, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission was created and Harry was appointed vice-chairman. He remained in that post until I left in 1975, when he then became chairman. We worked closely together for seven challenging, but exciting, years. The Board of Broadcast Governors had been in existence from 1958 to 1968, but a completely new act had been passed by Parliament and new policies were expected: An important increase of Canadian programs on radio and television, more Canadian music on radio, the Canadianization of all radio, television and cable companies. Almost all cable companies were American or British. It took about two years to arrange for the transfers to Canadian owners, and involved investments of about $150-million. We had support from some people in the industry -- mainly those who were acquiring some of those previously foreign properties. But the proposed increase in Canadian programming met with some pretty dramatic opposition.
Besides Harry, the commission included some journalists such as Pat Pearce from Montreal, literary critic and professor Northrop FRY, an engineer, top business people from every province, and a physician from a Newfoundland outport. Five of the 15 commissioners were full-time members. Despite lively controversies, decisions were unanimous.
Harry and I had an entirely informal relationship. We had the commission meetings, of course, but if something important suddenly came up, there were no appointments arranged through secretaries. There would be a sharp knock on my door, from Harry's big brass ring. He would come in and sit down. I enjoyed the interruption and dropped whatever I was doing. Very often, the discussion would reorient our thinking and open a new perspective in our deliberations.
Harry was a wonderful storyteller, and his collection of stories was inexhaustible. I have met few people with such an extraordinary memory. He remembered people, conversations, scenery, happenings, even odours in the general store that, if I remember well, his family owned in Wingham, Ontario Harry could hardly speak a word of French, but I was constantly amazed by the number of Friends he had in Quebec and how familiar he was with Quebec culture. Although he was not bilingual, he was bicultural.
Harry's career had been mostly in public broadcasting, while the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission dealt more often with private broadcasters throughout the country. But he seemed to have as many Friends in private radio and television as he had at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. There were few public broadcasters and hundreds of private broadcasters and cable companies. He had been so long and so creative in that field, and they respected his competence and his sense of humour. He seemed to enjoy himself despite the endless hours we had to spend in public hearings listening to applications for an increase in cable rates in northern Newfoundland or the Beauce region of Quebec or whether a Texas cable company owner in Trois-Rivières ought to be allowed to retain his company despite recent Canadian legislation.
I liked having Harry beside me during these hearings. We could share comments, and I enjoyed his very personal way of questioning applicants. I hope I may be permitted, now, to mention something I never brought up with him during all those years of companionship. Hearings would often go from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., sometimes for four or five days. Harry would smoke a pipe filled with very strong tobacco almost continuously. But our Friendship endured. Eventually, he moved back to Toronto. We met now and then but not often enough.
Pierre JUNEAU is a former broadcasting and National Film Board executive who served as chairman of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
An obituary of Harry J. BOYLE appeared on January 24.

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JUNEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-03-28 published
ARMSTRONG, William Thomas
Died of pneumonia on Friday, March 25, 2005 at Toronto Western Hospital. He leaves his wife Margaret, children Andrew and Jessica, his son-in-law Mark and his granddaughter Alison. Predeceased by his daughter Alison (1992). Bill joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Ottawa in 1957. He moved to Toronto in 1975 as Managing Director of radio. While he was managing director he set out to improve the quality and quantity of music and theatre on the second radio network (FM). In 1981 he left the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to become the first General Manager of Roy Thompson Hall. He moved back to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1983 to become Executive Vice President to the President Pierre JUNEAU. When Mr JUNEAU retired Bill served as Interim President until Gerard VEILLEUX's term began. Bill then went to the Ontario Region and retired in 1992.
In Ottawa he was organist and choirmaster of St. Matthias Church.
Visitation will be at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mt. Pleasant Road, Toronto on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 from 1-2 p.m. followed by a service in the Chapel at 2 p.m. Interment of his ashes will be at Wakefield Quebec at a later date. In lieu of flowers, a remembrance may be made to Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto.

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JUNG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-20 published
CORTESE, Dorothy Jean (EVANS)
After a courageous battle with emphysema, Dorothy Jean (EVANS) CORTESE, in her 75th year, passed away on Thursday, May 19th, 2005 at Stratford General Hospital. Predeceased by her husband Joseph Michael (July 1985). Loving mother of Bonnie MASSÉ (Michael), Gina JUNG (Bob,) and Daryl (Michelle.) Sister of Donald EVANS. Predeceased by her brother Jack EVANS, sisters Eula MANN and Marian MULCAHY. She will be sadly missed by her grandchildren, Michael (fiancé Jennifer), Brodie, Sadie, Hailey, Nick, Sophia, and Joey, as well as by her dear friend Linda POL and lifelong friend Molly SCOTT. Special prayers were sent from her nephews John, George, and Barry EVANS from England. Visitation will be held at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks North of Oxford), on Monday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church, 397 Springbank Drive, on Tuesday, May 24th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation with interment of ashes at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make a donation in memory of Dorothy are asked to consider The Lung Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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JUNG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-20 published
MINES, Queenie Victoria Louise (CLARKE)
On Friday, November 18, 2005, in her 97th year, with the grace and dignity that became her in life, Queenie Victoria Louise (CLARKE) MINES, died suddenly but not unexpectedly, at home, as was her wish. Her daughter, Carolyn May and son-in-law, John Gregory JUNG, her son Robert Henry Jackson MINES and her three grandchildren, Christopher Jonathan Clarke JUNG, Michael Jordan McLean JUNG and Catherine Victoria Elizabeth JUNG were by her side. Born on June 29, 1909, she is predeceased by her beloved husband, Robert Verdun MINES, her brother, Cecile CLARKE and her mother, Louise Caroline (JACKSON) CLARKE. The funeral will take place at 11 a.m. Monday, November 21, 2005 at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184). She will be interred beside Robert in Woodland Cemetery immediately after the service. In our sadness we are blessed and able to accept our loss with the support of family and Friends. Condolences will be accepted at the funeral home website www.amgeorgefh.on.ca. Donations in lieu of flowers may be sent to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, 617 Wellington Street, London N6A 3R6.

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JUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-09 published
JUNG, Henry Yee
Passed away peacefully on June 7, 2005. Beloved husband of Edith loving father to Hedy, Herb, Wendy, and Howard; loving grandfather to Lisa, Gordie, Sarah, David, Justine, Adam, and Nicole. He will also be missed by sons and daughters-in-law Michael, Ray, Joni, and May. Friends will be received from 9: 30-10:30 on Saturday morning, June 11, 2005 at the Pine Hills Visitation Chapel and Reception Centre, 625 Birchmount Road, Scarborough (north of St. Clair Ave. E.), 416-267-8229. Funeral service from 10: 30-11:30 a.m. with burial and reception to follow.

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JUNGWIRTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-09 published
FEDORCHUK, Mary (née OGURIAN)
Passed away at Caressant Care Nursing Home, Arthur, on Friday, January 7, 2005 in her 79th year; beloved wife of the late Michael FEDORCHUK; cherished mother of Jennie JUNGWIRTH and her husband Walter of Orangeville, Margie ISHII and her husband Seiji of Japan and Daniel FEDORCHUK of Taiwan; loved grandmother of Michael JUNGWIRTH, Rosemarie HILLIARD and her husband Ken and great-grandmother of Hanna Rose; also will be sadly missed by her other relatives and Friends. Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home & Chapel, 21 First Street, Orangeville, on Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, January 14, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted in memory of Mary in the Dods & McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A dedication service will be held on Sunday, September 11, 2005 at 2: 30 p.m. (Condolences may be offered to the family at www.dodsandmcnair.com)

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JUNIPER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-01-05 published
GREENFIELD, Russell John
At the Grey Bruce Health Services in Meaford on Monday, January 3rd, 2004. Russell John GREENFIELD of Meaford, and formerly of St. Vincent Township, in his 89th year. Predeceased by his beloved wife, the former Dorothy Arretta JUNIPER (December 28th, 1999.) Dear father of Ruth GARRETT of Meaford; Donald GREENFIELD of Owen Sound and Harley GREENFIELD and his wife Doris of Meaford (St. Vincent Township.) Loving grandfather of Gail GARRETT of Collingwood; Amanda and her husband Troy GOODFELLOW of Deep River Heather GREENFIELD of Meaford; Phillip GREENFIELD of Lucan; Stephanie GREENFIELD and her husband Paul MCINNES/MCINNIS of Kitchener-Waterloo and Erin GREENFIELD and his wife Tracy of Bermuda. Sadly missed by great-grandchildren Trevor and Griffin and Nyden John and Nicholas. Predeceased by three brothers and five sisters. Family received Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home in Meaford on Tuesday evening where brethren of the Pythagoras Lodge No. 137 A.F and A.M. conducted a memorial service. Funeral and committal services will be conducted at the funeral home on Wednesday, January 5th, 2005 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Lakeview Cemetery in Meaford. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford General Hospital Foundation or Arthritis Society would be appreciated.
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JUNIPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-23 published
ROBERTS, Ernest G.
(Veteran World War 2, Governor General's Horse Guards Regiment). Peacefully at Markham-Stouffville Hospital, on February 21, 2005, in his 92nd year. Ernie, beloved husband of Martha. Dear dad of Denise and her husband Kenneth PATRICK, Beverly and her husband Gerry NEALLY, Vicki and her husband Chuck JUNIPER and Don ROBERTS. Dear grandpa to 9 and great-grandpa to 7. Survived by his sister Audrey CLEIN. Friends may call at O'Neill Funeral Home, 6324 Main Street, Stouffville (905-642-2855) on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service in the chapel Friday at 1 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Cancer Society or Markham-Stouffville Hospital.

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JUNIPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-05 published
McFARLAND, Anne Theresa (McKENNA)
Peacefully at her son's home on Wednesday, August 3, 2005, Anne Theresa McKENNA, in her 90th year, beloved wife of the late James McFARLAND. Dear mother of Anne Marie McFARLAND and Joseph FARRUGIA, Rosemary McFARLAND, Jo-Anne McCONNELL, Helen (deceased) and Wayne JUNIPER, James and Barbara McFARLAND, Jack and Lynne McFARLAND, Patrick and May McFARLAND. Lovingly remembered by 11 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Bernadette SIBB, Tom McKENNA and predeceased by Helen, Robert, Bernard, John, Frank, Marguerite and Pat. Special thanks to Ofelia ALAG for her loving care. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213), Friday afternoon 2-4 and evening 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass will be held in Saint John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church, 16066 The Gore Road, Caledon East on Saturday morning, August 6 at 11 o'clock (leaving funeral home at 10: 30 a.m.). Interment St. Patrick's Cemetery, Brampton (Wildfield). Parish prayers will be held Friday evening at 8 o'clock. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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JUNK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-01-19 published
DAVIS, Rose
On Tuesday, January 18th, 2005, at North York General Hospital. Rose DAVIS, beloved wife of the late Henry DAVIS. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Allan and Elaine DAVIS, and Sharon and Victor MONCARZ. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Milton and Florence WUNCH, and Shirley and Harry NASH, and the late Irving WUNCH, Molly FOGEL, and Sylvia GOLDEN. Devoted grandmother of Kevin and Nancy DAVIS, Richard and Eva DAVIS, Drew MONCARZ, Jillian MONCARZ and Chris JUNK, and James MONCARZ. Cherished great-grandmother of Brandon, Aaron, and Mason. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (2 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, January 19th, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Court Topaz section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 133 Torresdale Ave. #202. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Rose and Henry DAVIS Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst St. Toronto M6A 2C3 416-780-0324.

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JUNK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-19 published
DAVIS, Rose
On Tuesday, January 18th, 2005, at North York General Hospital. Rose Davis, beloved wife of the late Henry DAVIS. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Allan and Elaine DAVIS, and Sharon and Victor MONCARZ. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Milton and Florence WUNCH, and Shirley and Harry NASH, and the late Irving WUNCH, Molly FOGEL, and Sylvia GOLDEN. Devoted grandmother of Kevin and Nancy DAVIS, Richard and Eva DAVIS, Drew MONCARZ, Jillian MONCARZ and Chris JUNK, and James MONCARZ. Cherished great-grandmother of Brandon, Aaron, and Mason. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (2 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Wednesday, January 19th, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Court Topaz section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 133 Torresdale Ave., No. 202. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Rose and Henry Davis Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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JUNKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-04 published
MARSHALL, Robert 'Bob'
Suddenly at his home in Whitby, after a short illness, on Wednesday, February 2, 2005. Bob, in his 78th year. Dearly beloved husband of Madeline (née FASOLINO) for 46 years. Loving father of Matthew and his wife Gaetane MARSHALL of Whitby, Frances and her husband Michael JUNKER of Bowmanville and Tony and his wife Tammy MARSHALL of Madoc. Devoted grandfather of Rachel, Melissa, Kyle, Desmond, Tori, Robert and Allicia. Predeceased by his brother Matthew. Relatives and Friends will be received at McIntosh-Anderson Funeral Home Ltd., 152 King St. E., Oshawa (905-433-5558) on Friday from 7-9 p.m. A service will be held at The Community Pentecostal Assembly Church, 416 Taunton Rd. W., Oshawa, on Saturday, February 5, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m. Donations made in memory of Bob to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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JUNKIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-27 published
PRICE, Jean (formerly SHILLABEER, BRYANT)
Died peacefully on Wednesday, October 26, 2005 with courage, strength, and grace. Jean's engaging smile and boundless warmth will be missed by her children Daphne (Stan) LOYKO of Tillsonburg Jennifer (Geoffrey) BROWN of Brampton; and David (Bonnie) PRICE of Maryhill. Predeceased by brothers Charles John, and Leonard Cress; husbands Edward John Montague SHILLABEER (1946,) and John BRYANT (1993.) Loved grandmother to Leslie and Kimberley JUNKIN John COATES, Sandra LOTHIAN, and Melanie and Christopher BRYANT. Great-grandmother to Kaleigh, Madison, and Mackenzie LOTHIAN. Survived by her husband Harold PRICE whom she married in 1998. Please join the family on Wednesday, November 2, 2005 at St. John's Anglican Church, Tillsonburg from 12 noon until 1 p.m. Funeral services for Jean will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church at 1 p.m. Reverend Richard JONES officiating. Cremation has taken place. Interment to follow at Tillsonburg Cemetery. At the family's request memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to the Alzheimer Society, and may be arranged through Ostrander's Funeral Home. Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell Street, Tillsonburg (519-842-5221) entrusted with funeral arrangements. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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JUNNILA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-06 published
JUNNILA, Shirley (née MATHERS)
Suddenly at St. Joseph's Health Care Centre on Saturday, February 5th, 2005, Shirley JUNNILA (née MATHERS) of London in her 68th year. Beloved wife of the late Ozzie JUNNILA (2001.) Dear mother of Sherry HILL (Rob,) and Lisa JUNNILA. Loving grandmother of Brett, Blake and Bryan. Funeral service will be held at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas St. (at Wavell) on Monday, February 7th at 1pm. (Visitation 1 hour prior.) Reverend Ron DAKIN officiating. Interment to follow. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be gratefully acknowledged. Memorial Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements 452-3770.

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JUNO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-12 published
HARRIS, Robert George (1927-2005)
Passed away in Greenfield Park on February 9, 2005 at the age of seventy-seven years. Member and Director of the Juno Beach Centre Association. Husband of Reine BEAULIEU. He also leaves to mourn his son Michael (Johanne), his daughter Marjorie, his grandchildren Jason, Matthew and Christa, his brothers Bill and Lorne, his sisters Betty, Mildred, Ruth, Marion and Norma as well as other family and Friends of the Harris, Beaulieu and Gillies families. In accordance with his wishes, cremation has taken place. Service to be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Juno Beach Centre Association (1-877-828- JUNO.) Funeral arrangements entrusted to Complexe Funeraire Fortin Rive-Sud, (514) 386-4642, www.complexefunerairefortin.com.

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JUNS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-09 published
COMPEAU, W. Michael -- Dispatch:
By Oliver MOORE, Saturday, July 9, 2005, Page M4
W. Michael COMPEAU learned to appreciate classical music as a young teen, snatching time to hear a local pianist before going to his after-school job in Gananoque, Ontario
The love affair with music lasted his whole life, partner Richard JUNS said, and helped him find prominent jobs even when his outsized personality got in the way.
Mr. JUNS, who had moved in with Mr. COMPEAU 18 years ago just two weeks after they met and compared Billie Holiday collections, said this week that his partner had once been a rabble-rouser who had long enjoyed a semi-itinerant lifestyle.
After years of hanging out in bohemian Yorkville, spending all his earnings on records and European travel, he got a job at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the late 1970s. Mr. JUNS said his partner was fired after only a few years, the story being that he was too much for the public broadcaster to handle.
"One of Michael's things is he does everything 100 per cent," like alcohol, Mr. JUNS said. "And he's a lot to handle when he's doing that," said the fortysomething engineer on long-term disability. "He just did it one too many times."
But even though Mr. COMPEAU sank into "a period of poverty," his vast knowledge of music remained well known and he got a job with CFMX, which was then a small rural station with a signal too weak to reach Toronto.
He became program director of the growing classical channel and then, when his health declined, quit his full-time job to become a sort of consultant to the station, officially called program director emeritus.
He died this spring of an infection related to lung cancer, at the age of 65, after collapsing in his Carlton Street home.

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