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"OUT" 2005 Obituary


OUTAR  OUTERBRIDGE  OUTHOUSE  OUTHWAITE  OUTRAM  OUTTRIM 

OUTAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-17 published
OUTAR, Daniel Joshua
Born June 12, 1953 and left to be with his Father and Saviour on October 12, 2005. Beloved husband of Rosaline. Loving father of Raymond, Daisy, Saudia and Janet. Proud papa of Sofia, Gabriel, Crystal and Christine. Dear son of Rita DALIGADU and the late Herman OUTAR. Brother of Ulrich, Joan, Archie, Jeanette and Dennis. Daniel will be missed dearly by all of his family and Friends. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home "Mississauga Chapel", 1981 Dundas St. W., (1 block east of Erin Mills Pkwy.) from 7-9 p.m. on Monday. Funeral Service to be held on Tuesday, October 18 at Erindale Bible Chapel, 1400 Dundas Cres., at 7 p.m. Private interment Meadowvale Cemetery. In lieu of flowers remembrances may be made to Beacon Bible Camp, c/o Erindale Bible Chapel. Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000 www.neweduk.com

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OUTERBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-09 published
McKEE, Agnes Grey " Nancy" (née HUNT)
Passed away peacefully in North Bay on August 6, 2005 in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late John Lawrence McKEE (1983) and the dearly loved Mom of John of Fort Liard, Nancy CONDLIFFE (Toby) of Toronto, Marianne ROGERS (Ed) of North Bay and Bruce (Mavis) of Naperville, Illinois. Cherished Gran of Janel; Keith, Elizabeth, Judy; Jon (Ruth), Joe, Jess; Steven, Jeremy, and Devin. Nancy was the dear sister of Jeanne NEIL, Toronto and was predeceased by her sister Elizabeth OUTERBRIDGE, sister-in-law Mary KING and brother-in-law John NEIL. Aunt Nancy to Jeff NEIL, Jennifer STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Chris, Kyle, Justin) and the Kings - Mary, Lorrie, Pat, Tom and Julie. Nancy was born in New Orleans, graduated from the University of Toronto, and moved to Northern Ontario in 1940. She dedicated her life to her family. Her volunteer work helped many in her community. There will be a family graveside service. In Nancy's memory, donations to the St. Andrew's United Church Memorial Fund, 399 Cassells Street, North Bay, Ontario P1B 3Z4 would be gratefully appreciated. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Martyn Funeral Home, North Bay.

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OUTERBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-12 published
OUTERBRIDGE, Ian Worrall, Q.C.
Suddenly, following a short illness, on Friday, September 9th, 2005, aged 76 years. Survived by his beloved wife and best friend for 51 years, Patricia, and by his children (and grandchildren): Richard; Donald and Beth COPITHORN (Ashley, Mallory and Michael) Kathryn and Nigel ROULET (Meagan and Andrea;) Kristine (Alexander, Hunter and Jacob DEEKS;) and Peter and Tammy (Samuel and Thomas.) Born in China, Ian received his call to the bar in 1955 and rose to prominence as a formidable Toronto litigator, in one case appearing before the Supreme Court of the United States. Dad - Mr. O - will be sorely missed by the family, Friends, colleagues and clients whom over the course of life came to rely upon his love, faith, charity and counsel. Visitation at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West (between Islington and Kipling Avenues), between the hours of 6-9 p.m. on Tuesday, September 13th; and from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, September 14th. Funeral services will be held at Humber Valley United Church, 76 Anglesey Boulevard, where Ian was long a congregant, on Thursday, September 15th at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow.

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OUTERBRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-12 published
OUTERBRIDGE, Ian Worrall, Q.C.
Suddenly, following a short illness, on Friday, September 9, 2005, age 76 years. Survived by his beloved wife and best friend for 51 years, Patricia, and by his children (and grandchildren): Richard; Donald and Beth Copithorn (Ashley, Mallory and Michael) Kathryn and Nigel ROULET (Meagan and Andrea;) Kristine (Alexander, Hunter and Jacob DEEKS;) and Peter and Tammy (Samuel and Thomas.) Born in China, Ian received his call to the bar in 1955 and rose to prominence as a formidable Toronto litigator, in one case appearing before the Supreme Court of the United States. Dad - Mr. O - will be sorely missed by the family, Friends, colleagues and clients whom over the course of life came to rely upon his love, faith, charity and counsel. Visitation at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West (between Islington and Kipling Aves.), between the hours of 6-9 p.m. on Tuesday, September 13th; and from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, September 14th. Funeral Services will be held at Humber Valley United Church, 76 Anglesey Boulevard, where Ian was long a congregant, on Thursday, September 15th, at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow.

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OUTHOUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-26 published
NICHOLS, Doris Edwina (OUTHOUSE)
Born in Centreville, Digby County, Nova Scotia, April 1, 1940.
Died May 25, 2005 peacefully in Digby, Nova Scotia after a valiant but short fight with cancer Doris is sadly missed by her husband, H. Neil NICHOLS and her children Michael, Dale, Sherri and her husband Gary DAVIS, Susan and her husband Richard CONNERY, Lori and her husband Phil OUDI- REIMERINK and by her grandchildren, James and Erin, Elyse and Steven; Austin and Cassandra all of Toronto and Ashley, Nicole and Neil of Connecticut and by her mother, Regina OUTHOUSE and the late Carmen OUTHOUSE and her brother Carmen of Digby and her sister Lucille of London, Ontario and their families. Doris had many other Friends, àunts, Uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews who will also miss her greatly.
The family wishes to thank the staff of Digby General Hospital, Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto and Trillium Hospital in Mississauga for all of their assistance and loving care of Doris during her illness and also thanks to her close Friends for their thoughtfulness.
There will be a private family service held for Doris in Digby at Jaynes Funeral Home on May 26, 2005. Any consideration in honour of Doris can be made to one of the above hospitals.

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OUTHWAITE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-12-24 published
OUTHWAITE, Elizabeth S. " Lil"
Passed away peacefully in her sleep, surrounded by family, on Monday, December 19, 2005, at Uxbridge Cottage Hospital at the age of 89. Loving wife of the late Roland. Beloved mother of Gayle (Glen), and Susan (Gary). Sadly missed by grandchildren Robin (Marilynn), Sean (Lynsey), Matthew, and Paul (Tammy) and Nicole. Cherished Nana of 7 great-grandchildren. Service to be held at Low and Low Funeral Home, 23 Main Street South, Uxbridge, (905-852-3073), on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 at 1: 00 p.m., immediately followed by a reception at 30 Church Street, Uxbridge. Private family interment in Pine Hills Cemetery, Scarborough, at a future date. The family would like to sincerely thank the staff of Versa-Care Centre Uxbridge for the loving care and support provided to Lil in her last years. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Alzheimer Society of York Region, 800 Davis Dr. no. 6, Newmarket, Ontario., L3Y 1J6.

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OUTRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-01 published
Richard OUTRAM, Poet 1930-2005
Writer who was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation stagehand by day viewed the world in a grain of sand. A private and intensely emotional man, his devotion to his art was nourished by a lifelong love of his wife, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - Page S7
On the coldest night of the winter, poet, stagehand and widower Richard OUTRAM, having consumed a quantity of pills and drink, sat on the enclosed side porch of his house in Port Hope, Ontario, and, in a grand Blakean gesture, contemplated the universe and quietly allowed himself to die.
Everything that made his life joyful emanated from his love for his wife and collaborator, the artist Barbara HOWARD. She died in 2002 during an operation to fix a broken hip. "Devotion is not too strong a word," said writer Barry CALLAGHAN. " The two of them fed each other beautifully and with enormous intensity. They were the closing of the couplet. So, what are you going to do with a one-line couplet? He really was his work and his love for her."
Mr. OUTRAM was not the only poet to have a day job that required entirely different skills from his literary vocation. The poet Raymond SOUSTER, for example, spent his working life at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. It was Mr. OUTRAM's conscious decision to spend his days at physical labour so his mind would be free in the evenings to devote to his poetry. But unlike other working poets, such as Mr. SOUSTER, Mr. OUTRAM won very little popular or critical acclaim.
Although he published steadily for more than 40 years, he won only one major prize -- the City of Toronto Book Award in 1999 for his volume Benedict Abroad. There is only one book-length critical study of his work, Peter Sanger's "Her kindled shadow..." An Introduction to the Work of Richard OUTRAM, which was published in limited numbers by The Antigonish Review in 2001.
Instead of a popular audience, he had a series of passionate champions, such as Mr. Sanger, a retired academic. "Richard has both a physical and a metaphysical orientation that isn't compromised at either level," explained Mr. Sanger. "When Richard writes well there is absolutely no distinction between those two levels." Although Mr. Sanger agrees some poems are better than others, he says what makes Mr. OUTRAM's work stand out is its "magnificence coherence." Every poem is ultimately linked to the rest of his body of work.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario, the son of Mary Muriel DALEY, a teacher, and Alfred Allan OUTRAM, an engineer who served in the artillery in The First World War and was wounded at Ypres in Belgium. His mother's father was a Methodist minister who was deeply involved in the negotiations to form the United Church of Canada in 1925. His paternal grandfather ran the hardware store in Port Hope, the town east of Oshawa where Mr. OUTRAM and his wife moved in 2000.
Shortly after young Richard's birth, his parents moved to the Leaside area of Toronto. As a teenager, Mr. OUTRAM was already interested in music and botany, two areas that remained central to his poetry for the rest of his life. Graduating from Leaside Secondary School in 1949, he went that autumn to Victorian College at the University of Toronto to begin an honours degree in English and Philosophy. There he encountered two professors, philosopher Emil FACKENHEIM and literary critic Northrop FRYE, both of whom had a huge impact on the way he thought about the world. He also enlisted as an officer cadet in the reserve system of the Royal Canadian Navy, spending the summers of 1950 and 1951 aboard frigates in the Bay of Fundy and at H. M. C. S. Stadacona in Halifax.
After he graduated from the University of Toronto in 1953, he worked for a year at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto as a stagehand and then moved to England where he found a job in the same capacity for the British Broadcasting Corporation. It was in London that he first began to write poetry and where, in 1954, he met visual artist Barbara HOWARD. From that meeting their lives were entwined until her death in 2002.
"You can't speak of them apart," said Louise DENNYS, executive vice-president of Random House Canada. "They were so completely connected and so beloved of each other, and that is what proved in the end to be impossible for him to live without."
Four years older than Mr. OUTRAM, Ms. HOWARD was born in Toronto in 1926, began drawing as a child, graduated with honours and a silver medal from the Ontario College of Art in 1951 and then taught school to earn enough money to continue her studies in the major art centres of Europe.
They returned to Canada in 1956 and Mr. OUTRAM went back to working as a stage hand and then crew leader at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a job he would hold until he retired at 60 in June, 1990. The late typographical designer Allan FLEMING/FLEMMING (of the Canadian National logo among other work) was the best man at their wedding in April, 1957, and also the designer and publisher of Mr. OUTRAM's first collection, Eight Poems, a chapbook with a print run of 190 copies that appeared in 1959 under the Tortoise Press imprint.
The next year, Mr. OUTRAM and Ms. HOWARD founded The Gauntlet Press, producing an elegant series of hand-printed volumes of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry over the years decorated with Ms. HOWARD's beautifully coloured wood engravings.
Early in their marriage, the OUTRAMs had a daughter who lived for only a day. His grief is encased in several poems including Sarah, which appeared in his first major collection, Exsultate, Jubilate (1966,) an elegant volume designed by Mr. FLEMING/FLEMMING and published by Macmillan Co. of Canada.
Toronto writer Barry CALLAGHAN, who was one of the hosts on Weekend, a local Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television show, met Mr. OUTRAM on the set in the late 1960s. "I became aware of this intense man standing beside the camera, dressed like a guy working on the floor but staring at me like a hawk," Mr. CALLAGHAN said in a telephone conversation. After the two men struck up a conversation, "I discovered this very isolated and intensely intellectual man who was interested in poetry and ideas."
In the middle 1970s, Mr. OUTRAM took the manuscript for Turns and Other Poems to the now defunct Clarke Irwin publishing house. Two young editors, Susan KEENE and Louise DENNYS pushed the collection, but Clarke Irwin was already in its demise and was doing very little original publishing.
"He had a shining, sharp, sense of the natural world and he was able to give it a sense of form, a sense of greatness larger than and one moment," said Ms. DENNYS. "He saw the world in a grain of sand and he did that in a way that was very beautiful and very particular to his work and to him."
Ms. DENNYS wanted to find a way to publish the book and Mr. OUTRAM suggested she meet his friend bookseller Hugh ANSON- CARTWRIGHT. Bookseller and poet had met years before, the way such people usually do, over a volume of Mr. OUTRAM's poetry that Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT was trying to sell in his bookstore. Then it turned out that they were neighbours and a lifelong Friendship ensured.
The Christmas of 1974, Ms. DENNYS took the manuscript on a visit home to her parents in England and cold-visited the Hogarth Press, a division of Chatto and Windus. She met poetry editor D. J. Enright, who eventually offered to publish Mr. OUTRAM's poems. She came back to Canada and was able to tell Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT that if he wanted to form a little publishing company, here was a British partner. That is how Turns and Other Poems was published by Chatto and Windus with the Hogarth Press in London in 1975 and by Anson-Cartwright Editions in Toronto the following year. "That moment, when I elided happily in his life back then, was a moment of great pride for Hugh and for me too," she said. "It was the first time that I was involved directly in a book's publication."
Mr. ANSON- CARTWRIGHT published another volume of OUTRAM poems, The Promise of Light in 1979 and Mr. Callaghan's Exile Editions did a Selected Poems in 1984. "He had a fantastic sense of form and a musical ear for what he was doing that was almost perfect, but often his poems were the prisoner of his skill," said Mr. CALLAGHAN, adding that "you can't be first rate every time out and there are times when the form traps what he is trying to do."
Shortly after writer Alberto MANGUEL arrived in Canada in 1983, he met Mr. OUTRAM. "I was awed at first by the strange combination of intelligence and devastating humour," said Mr. MANGUEL. " For all the seriousness of his poetry, he was a very funny man."
After reading Mr. OUTRAM's poetry, Mr. MANGUEL says he was surprised, as he has been so many times in Canada, that "a poet of Richard's magnitude" was not celebrated around the world. "Richard's poems were very serious and complex, and in many cases they required a lot of time and patience from readers," said Mr. MANGUEL. " You had to disentangle the references and look up the words, but it was always worthwhile. When you discovered what he meant, the poem built to a different level."
The next person to publish Mr. OUTRAM was Tim INKSTER of The Porcupine's Quill, who released Man in Love (1985), Hiram and Jenny (1989) Mogul Recollected (1993) and Dove Legend (2001). "It is incredibly elegant and sophisticated and passionate and demanding and even, to a lot of people, off-putting, because verbally it is immensely clever and full of allusions and references," said writer and poetry editor John METCALF. "It is probably some of the most rewarding stuff that has been written in Canada."
Writing poetry, even life itself, lost its purpose for Mr. OUTRAM after his wife died. "Richard was always sending me poems that he loved by other people," said Mr. MANGUEL, mentioning the poem Winter Remembered by John Crowe Ransom about an "... Absence, in the heart, /" that was too great to bear and how the only way to soothe it was to "...walk forth in the frozen air/."
"He must have been thinking of that poem," concluded Mr. MANGUEL sadly.
Funambulist by Richard OUTRAM, 1975
I work on a slender strand
Slung between two poles
Braced fifteen feet apart.
My patient father coached me
From childhood to fall unhurt,
Then set me again and again
On a crude slack-rope he rigged
Out back of our caravan,
Raising the rope by inches:
Now, I'm the only acrobat
In the world to include in his act,
As finale, a one-hand-stand
Thirty feet from the ground
With no net. I married
A delicate, lithe girl
From another circus family.
We are very happy. She stands
On the circular platform top
Of one pole, to steady me
As I reach the steep, last,
Incredibly difficult slope
Near the pole: when I turn about
To retrace my steps, no matter
How quickly I spin, she is there
At the top of the opposite pole,
Waiting, her arms outstretched.
From Turns and Other Poems, published by ANSON- CARTWRIGHT Editions.
Richard Daley OUTRAM was born in Oshawa, Ontario on April 9, 1930. He died of willful hypothermia in Port Hope, Ontario, on Friday, January 21, 2005. He was 74. He was predeceased by his wife Barbara. A celebration of their lives is being planned for a later date.

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OUTRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-23 published
HOYTE, Dennis Winfield
Peacefully at St. Joseph's Health Centre on Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005. Beloved husband of Suzanne, son of Amy and the late George OUTRAM. Loving father of Terry, Ronald and Kim (Eric.) Brother of Dorothy (Charles), Joyce, Sheila (Errol), Shirley (Keith), Anthony (Joycelyn), Douglas, Frank (Grace), Carl (Cheryl) and the late Percy. Grandfather and uncle to many. Friends may call at the Giffen-Mack "Danforth" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2570 Danforth Ave., (at Main St. subway), 416-698-3121, on Friday, June 24th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service to be held in the Giffen-Mack Chapel on Saturday, June 25th at 11 a.m. Interment to follow in Pine Hills Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Canadian Lung Association would be appreciated by his family.

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OUTRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-12 published
OUTRAM, Edward Alexander " Ted"
In Montreal on November 5, 2005. Predeceased by his mother Nancy, he will be sadly missed by his father John (Lilian), sisters Kari and Patti, nieces Alicia and Chantal, nephews Scott and Blake and all his relatives and Friends. A family interment has been held. In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of choice would be appreciated.

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OUTTRIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-09 published
SHIER, R. Philip
Aged seventy-nine, lawyer, lover of many Friends and of life in general, died at his home in Vancouver on November 3rd, 2005 after struggling with cancer for eight months. Predeceased by his sister, Stephanie OUTTRIM. Survived by his sons Mark, (Barbara and grand_son Chris) and John (Margaret and granddaughters Fuchsia and Chelsea) and by Patricia KRAMER and granddaughter Rowen also by his brother Richard (wife Lenora) and brother-in-law Frank OUTTRIM and five cousins, five nephews and nieces and ten great nephews and great nieces. He will be greatly missed by the Friends who helped him through his last illness and especially by his beloved friend of many years, Marjorie (Jo) KEDDY. The family especially wishes to thank Dr. Duncan Miller, Lea Bennix, R.N., and the home care and nursing staff from the Home Hospice Program for their excellent care during Philip's last illness.
Born in Vancouver, Phil graduated from U.B.C. Law School in 1954 and articled to the late Jack Bourne, Q.C. He was called to the Bar in May 1955 and after working in the oil industry in Alberta returned to British Columbia to practice law in Dawson Creek and later in Vancouver where he established his reputation as a respected labour lawyer representing both Management and Union clients. He was often involved in industrial relations for some of the Province's leading economic industries.
He held a variety of professional offices including, President of the Vancouver Bar Association, Chairman of the Canadian Law Information Council, Executive Director of the Arbitrators Association of British Columbia and Secretary/Treasurer of the University of British Columbia Law Alumni Association. In retirement he served as a Canadian observer in critical elections in Albania and Bosnia.
He was a gregarious man with a remarkable gift for fun and Friendships. He was a proud and active member of the Terminal City Club and the Arbutus Club in Vancouver. In his career and in retirement he enjoyed life thoroughly, reading eclectically, travelling often and nurturing his many Friendships. He was a lover of Jazz music, good parties and had a prodigious memory for anecdotes and humour with which he regaled his Friends.
No service by Phil's request, but a celebration of his life will be held on Monday, November 14th from 4: 45 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. (tributes starting at 5: 30 p.m.), President's Ball Room, Second Floor, Terminal City Club, 837 West Hastings Street.
Donations may be made in his memory and sent to the Philip Shier Memorial Fund, 13911 - 22A Avenue, Surrey, British Columbia V4A 9V4. The Fund will benefit deserving law students.

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