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"ABD" 2006 Obituary


ABDALLAH  ABDEY  ABDULLAH 

ABDALLAH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-07 published
ABDALLAH, Ella Catherine (née JOHNSON)
Surrounded by the love of her family and in the kind and loving care of the staff of Middlesex Terrace, Ella Catherine (JOHNSON) passed away peacefully on Friday, October 6th, 2006. Beloved wife of 54 years to the late Wilfred ABDALLAH (2005.) Dear mother of Martha (2001,) Steve (Judy,) Mike, Angela (Rob KINSMAN,) and Dan (Gwen) ABDALLAH. Loving Nana to Zac, Nick, Brent, Tommy, Steven, Rachel, Alex and Fraser. Daughter of the late Edna and Neil JOHNSON. Ella will be missed by her brothers, Pat (Margaret Mary,) Ted (Leigh) and Bill JOHNSON, and by her sisters Marie (Bob) HARDY, Betty (Frank) HAGGARTY, Madeline BLACKMORE, Pat GIGNAC, Margaret (Mike) FEENEY, and Rosemary JOHNSON. Predeceased by brothers Neil and Mike. Dear sister-in-law of Florence (1986), and Lillian (2005) ABDALLAH, and Lorraine McFALL of Covington, Georgia. The family will receive Friends at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Monday October 9th from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. George's Roman Catholic Church, 1164 Commissioners Road West, on Tuesday, October 10th, 2006 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment, Saint Peter's Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Ella are asked to consider Jesse's Journey or The Easter Seals Society.

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ABDALLAH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-21 published
ABDALLAH, Ella Catherine
To all of those family and Friends, near and far, who helped us say farewell to our dear Mother and Nana, Ella Catherine ABDALLAH, thank you. Your flowers, memorial donations, prayers, and expressions of sympathy have meant so much to all of us. Mom was an extraordinary woman and it warmed our hearts to see that she was loved and respected by so many. Thanks again to the wonderful staff at Westview Funeral Chapel. And, although you do your jobs very well and we appreciate your support, we don't want to see you again for a very long time! To Father John, Mary Catherine BISHOP, the Choir and the Catholic Women's League ladies of St. George's Parish, Mom always loved your beautiful Church and we thank you for sharing it with her one last time. To Father Frank, the ladies of Sacred Heart Parish in Delaware, and Linda COOPER, we thank you for your spiritual care and comfort, especially in this past, difficult year since losing Dad. Mom always enjoyed the time she spent with each of you. And how can we ever thank the wonderful staff at Middlesex Terrace for their devotion For seven years you had the pleasure of Mom's advice and candor, sharing your Friendship in both the good times and the bad. Your love and care, especially during those last few days was more comforting than you'll ever know. We're certain that Mom now understands how very blessed her life really was and how all the suffering and all the love were meant to bring us together…to build character…to strengthen our family bond. May she find peace of heart in knowing that her life was more meaningful than she ever imagined and that her children, grandchildren, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, family and Friends will miss her more than she'll ever know. - The ABDALLAH Family

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ABDEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-04 published
TOWERS, George V.
Of Saint Thomas passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Continuing Care Centre on Sunday, April 2, 2006, in his 91st year. Husband of Ruth (FINCH) Rogers TOWERS and the late Rhoda (PAFFORD) TOWERS (1985.) Father of Barbara EWART and her husband Robert, and Kenneth V. TOWERS and his wife Lois, all of Saint Thomas. Step-father of Donna USHER and her husband Glen of Princeton, and Beth GILLIS and her partner John DICKSON/DIXON of Tiverton. Also survived by 7 grandchildren, many great-grandchildren, 1 great-great-granddaughter, and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a great-grand_son, Scott KYLE, sisters, Elizabeth GARVEY, Agnes TEMPLE and Mildred WILSON and by brothers, Walter R. TOWERS and Frederick TOWERS. Born in Saint Thomas, May 25, 1915, the son of the late Walter and Mary Ann (ABDEY) TOWERS. He was the retired divisional vice-president of manufacturing for Clark Equipment Canada Ltd., Saint Thomas. George was a member of Grace United Church, a life member of Saint Thomas Lodge #44, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, a member of the London Lodge of Perfection, Mocha Temple Shrine, London and the Hi-Ro Shrine Club of Elgin. Friends will be received at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Thursday at 1: 30 p.m. Interment in Elmdale Memorial Park. Memorial donations to the charity of one's choice gratefully acknowledged. A Masonic memorial service will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday at 6: 45 p.m. under the auspices of Saint Thomas Lodge #44, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons

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ABDEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-04 published
LAGROU, Margaret
Peacefully at Kensington Village Retirement Home on Tuesday, October 3, 2006 Margaret loving wife of Gus (Jules) LAGROU in her 84th year. Dear aunt of Theresa (Dave) ABDEY, Francis (Norma) LAGROU, Mary (Barry) HUNTER, Roger (Melanie) LAGROU. Predeceased by her nephew David LAGROU (2005.) Also survived by many grandnieces, nephews and family in Belgium. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass at St. Patrick's Church, 377 Oakland Avenue at Dundas Street, on Thursday morning at 11 o'clock. Interment in Saint Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Donations to the Diabetes Association would be appreciated.

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ABDULLAH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-27 published
Jean LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY, Nurse And Union Organizer (1931-2006)
In 1957, the year she completed training, Ontario nurses were overworked, underpaid, undervalued and expected to stand when a doctor entered the room. She decided to do something about it
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Toronto -- Asked about working conditions for nurses in Ontario in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Anita ABDULLAH chuckles in that exasperated way. "We were indentured servants," sighs the London, Ontario, nurse, who began working in 1970. "Little more than glorified slaves." In 1973, newly minted registered nurses earned $7,736 a year. No health benefits. No occupational safety provisions. No notice or severance required for layoffs. Overtime of 30 minutes or less a day was unpaid -- and it added up.
And is it true that a nurse who happened to be sitting was obliged to stand when a doctor entered the room? Mrs. ABDULLAH doesn't pause. "You're darn right. If you didn't, you were disciplined."
Nurses were overworked, underpaid, and undervalued. So, Mrs. ABDULLAH's friend and colleague, Jean LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY, set out to change that -- but not before she duly noted that the plight of nurses was not completely the fault of management.
"I was concerned about the apathy of nurses at the time with respect to working conditions," Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY observed a few years ago. "The nurses complained constantly over coffee and lunch but didn't feel comfortable complaining to a higher authority. They worried about losing their jobs. They didn't have the nerve to take action. The question for me was, what could be done to help the situation."
Fortunately for nurses in Ontario, Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY had nerve to spare. On October 13, 1973, in a landmark meeting in Toronto, more than 300 representatives of 85 independent nurses' organizations from across the province joined forces to form the Ontario Nurses' Association, with Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY installed as founding president.
Just nine months later, after a brief but noisy labour dispute, the Ontario Nurses' Association reached an 18-month agreement with Queen's Park covering 10,000 registered nurses in 41 hospitals, boosting starting salaries to $10,200 annually and maximum salaries by a healthy 50 per cent.
Eventually, the union would bring together 104 separate nurses' associations.
It was while working as a nurse herself that Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY realized many of her colleagues were unhappy with their hours, shift work, low pay and lack of prestige. "When attempts to work with management to set standards failed, she and others decided that collective bargaining was the answer," related Ontario Nurses' Association chief executive officer Lesley BELL. " Thousands of registered nurses have benefited from her efforts since."
Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY served two, one-year terms as president of the Ontario Nurses' Association, today a powerful union representing more than 51,000 registered nurses and allied health professionals in hospitals, community health, long-term care, Canadian Blood Services, clinics and industry. For 16 years, she worked at several staff positions at the association, retiring in 1991 as an honorary member.
For a time, she was also director and acting chair of the Ontario Health Coalition.
Over the past 30 years, the Ontario Nurses' Association has spearheaded great strides for nurses in pay, layoff provisions, overtime, parental leave and recognition of previous experience, to name a few areas.
Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY would note with satisfaction the changes brought about over the years, not only in the strength and power of the nursing collective, but in how nurses regard themselves. "Today, nurses don't hesitate to go up to the mike and speak their peace," she said recently. "Nurses are now much better educated and know how to achieve a particular goal, whether it concerns working conditions or any other issue."
The eldest of six children born to farmers in the Caledon region outside Toronto during the Depression, she was among 14 psychiatric nursing graduates of the Ontario Hospital in Whitby in 1951, finishing her studies on time despite a broken hip suffered in a car accident. Six years later, she received her certification in public health from the University of Toronto.
It was while nursing in the community-health sector that she joined a committee formed to hear complaints about working conditions. In the early 1960s, Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY went to work for the Etobicoke Health Department at a time when nurses in Peel and Halton counties were beginning to form their own associations and gain certification for the purpose of collective bargaining, which proved useful when they did not get anticipated raises.
Given the low wages and status the job was saddled with in her day, why did people -- women, back then -- enter the profession at all?
"The prestige came from the satisfaction we got from making our patients feel better," offers Mrs. ABDULLAH. " Adjusting a pillow, washing somebody's face, cleaning their teeth, rubbing their back, sitting and holding their hand, listening to them cry in pain and trying to soothe them -- that's what made it all worthwhile."
So didn't Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY and other nurses who entered the labour end of things, locking horns with adversaries, miss that compassion?
"While you missed that gratification of being at a bedside, how you rationalized [that] was you hoped that through your skills and your activism, you were able to make a bigger contribution to your profession," said Mrs. ABDULLAH, who worked alongside Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY at the Ontario Nurses' Association for a decade.
Mrs. LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY's accomplishments were acknowledged in Ontario's legislature earlier this month. George Smitherman, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, no stranger to the fortunes of nurses in the province, said the profession today "can proudly claim to be respected, strong and united. [Nurses] are, as they have always been, the heart and soul of health care. Today, they are recognized as such, which is something that they have not always been. Thousands of nurses have benefited from the efforts made and the example set by Jean LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY. As a result of that, hundreds and thousands of patients have as well."
Another dimension to Jean LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY was her love of playing nickel slots at casinos. "In the last few years, she played just from her winnings," Mrs. ABDULLAH smiles.
Lamentably, for a nurse, it was a long-time smoking habit that resulted in the lung cancer that finally claimed her. "She said to me a couple of weeks ago, 'Ironic isn't it'? recalled Mrs. ABDULLAH. " 'All the years I was a public-health nurse advising people to quit smoking…' "
Jean Marilyn LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY was born in the Caledon region of Ontario on September 23, 1931, and died in Toronto on April 3, 2006, of lung cancer. She was 75. She leaves her long-time partner, Fred Barthel, daughter Marylin Bailey and son Paul LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY, two grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

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