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"EXA" 2006 Obituary


EXAN 

EXAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-12 published
BOYD, John " Jack"
Of Fonthill, passed away at the Welland Hospital, on Saturday, June 10, 2006, in his 96th year. Beloved husband of Dorothy Marie (HANSEN) BOYD and the late Dorothy Mabel (KELLS) BOYD (1942.) Loving father of Doug BOYD and his wife Bev STOUT of Kingston, Gwen MORPHY and her husband Lorne of Toronto, Susan VAN EXAN and her husband Rob of Newmarket and Janice BOYD of Vancouver, British Columbia. Also loved by his grandchildren Jennifer MacDONALD and her husband Tom of Kelowna, British Columbia, Catherine BOYD and her spouse Scott WILLOUGHBY of Yellowknife, N.W.T. and his great-grandchildren Matthew MacDONALD and Emma and Jack WILLOUGHBY. Dear brother of David H. BOYD of Toronto and predeceased by brothers Hugh, James and William, and sisters Agnes BOYD and May SEARLE. Jack was a graduate of University of Toronto Engineering "Class of 1934". He worked at Hollinger Mines in Timmins, followed by a long career at Atlas Steel in Welland, retiring in 1976. Jack was an active member of Fonthill Baptist Church and an avid golfer and gardener. Special thanks to the nursing staff on the 4th floor at Welland Hospital for their compassion and care during Dad's brief stay. Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, June 14th at the James L. Pedlar Funeral Home, 1292 Pelham Street, Fonthill. The funeral service will be conducted at Fonthill Baptist Church, 1414 Pelham Street, Fonthill, on Thursday, June 15th, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Russell MYERS officiating. Interment Fonthill Cemetery. Expression of sympathy may be made to Fonthill Baptist Church Memorial Fund, 1414 Church Hill, Fonthill L0S 1E0, to the Welland Hospital Foundation, 65 Third Street, Welland L3B 4W6, or to a charity of your choice. Online condolences may be forwarded through www.pedlarfuneralhome.ca

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EXAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-14 published
BOYD, John " Jack"
Of Fonthill, passed away at the Welland Hospital, on Saturday, June 10, 2006, in his 96th year. Beloved husband of Dorothy Marie (HANSEN) BOYD and the late Dorothy Mabel (KELLS) BOYD (1942.) Loving father of Doug BOYD and his wife Bev STOUT of Kingston, Gwen MORPHY and her husband Lorne of Toronto, Susan VAN EXAN and her husband Rob of Newmarket and Janice BOYD of Vancouver, British Columbia. Also loved by his grandchildren Jennifer MacDONALD and her husband Tom of Kelowna, British Columbia, Catherine BOYD and her spouse Scott WILLOUGHBY of Yellowknife, N.W.T. and his great-grandchildren Matthew MacDONALD and Emma and Jack WILLOUGHBY. Dear brother of David H. BOYD of Toronto and predeceased by brothers Hugh, James and William, and sisters Agnes BOYD and May SEARLE. Jack was a graduate of University of Toronto Engineering "Class of 1934". He worked at Hollinger Mines in Timmins, followed by a long career at Atlas Steel in Welland, retiring in 1976. Jack was an active member of Fonthill Baptist Church and an avid golfer and gardener. Special thanks to the nursing staff on the 4th floor at Welland Hospital for their compassion and care during Dad's brief stay. Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, June 14th at the James L. Pedlar Funeral Home, 1292 Pelham Street, Fonthill. The funeral service will be conducted at Fonthill Baptist Church, 1414 Pelham Street, Fonthill, on Thursday, June 15th, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Russell MYERS officiating. Interment Fonthill Cemetery. Expression of sympathy may be made to Fonthill Baptist Church Memorial Fund, 1414 Church Hill, Fonthill L0S 1E0, to the Welland Hospital Foundation, 65 Third Street, Welland L3B 4W6, or to a charity of your choice. Online condolences may be forwarded through www.pedlarfuneralhome.ca

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EXAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-05 published
Joe LORIMER, Air Canada Pilot (1916-2006)
A flying instructor at the outset of the Second World War, he never flew in combat but trained many others who would. He retired in 1976 with 21,676 commercial hours under his belt
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
Toronto -- Joe LORIMER was sure he was going overseas when he volunteered for the Royal Canadian Air Force in the week that Canada declared war on Germany in September of 1939. He was fit, eager and, most of all, an experienced pilot.
The Royal Canadian Air Force had other plans. Mr. LORIMER not only knew how to fly, he was also a flight instructor. That made him too valuable to send overseas, so he was put to work training pilots. He spent his entire working life flying, first as an instructor during the war, then as a captain for Trans-Canada Airlines and Air Canada, flying just about every type of aircraft they ever used, from 10-seat Lockheeds to 400-seat Boeing 747s.
Mr. LORIMER grew up in Kerrobert, Saskatchewan., a town about 100 kilometres west of Saskatoon, where his father was in the coal business and managed to prosper even in the 1930s when times were tough. There, young Joe led a storybook Prairie life, playing hockey, curling and singing in the church choir. He graduated from high school in 1933 and went to Saskatoon to learn to fly. He soon became an instructor at the Saskatoon Flying Club.
When war broke out, Canada and Britain had a pilot shortage. Mr. LORIMER, not surprisingly, possessed urgently required skills. On December 16, 1939, the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan came into being. Canada had lots of space and private airfields, so, in the words of the war propagandists, it became "the arsenal of democracy." Canada also carried the bulk of the cost, spending $1.5-billion compared with Britain's $54-million. By the end of the war, 131,553 aircrew had been through the system.
Mr. LORIMER started training pilots at his home base in Saskatoon. Eventually, though, he was also posted to Trenton, Ontario, and later Fort William (now Thunder Bay). His logbook shows he trained pilots in the Tiger Moth, a fairly primitive open-cockpit biplane that was easy to fly. Later, his own rating as an instructor moved up a few notches and he provided advanced training on twin-engine Oxfords and Avro Ansons.
In March of 1942, he became an employee of the Winnipeg Air Observer School, as its chief flying instructor. It was there that he met his first wife, Esther ROBERTSON, who had joined the Winnipeg Flying Club -- not to learn how to fly but because it was a place said to have good dances.
Although appreciated by their civilian bosses and by the war planners in Ottawa, most instructors hankered to see action, later suffering the postwar stigma of not having flown in combat. Perhaps reflecting that, a poem (author unknown) was found among Mr. LORIMER's papers. Called The Flying Instructors' Lament, it went, in part, like this:
What did you do in the war, daddy,
How did you help us to win?
Circuits and bumps and turns, laddy,
And how to get out of a spin.
Woe and alack and misery me!
I trundle around in the sky,
And instead of machine-gunning Nazis,
I'm teaching young hopefuls to fly.
We never get posted to fighters,
we just get a spell on the Link.
So it's circuits and bumps
from morning till noon,
and instrument flying till 10.
In late 1942, Mr. LORIMER was seconded from the air-training program and ordered to join Trans-Canada Airlines, which was then short of commercial pilots. For the rest of the war, he was stationed in Winnipeg, flying such aircraft as the Lockheed Lodestar. Less than two years later, he was made captain.
After the war, Mr. LORIMER went on loan to Thunder Bay Airlines for a short while, then returned to Trans-Canada Airlines to fly the four-engine DC-4, known as North Stars in Canada. These larger, pressurized planes carried about 60 passengers and could easily fly over mountains and through bad weather. They were followed by the more advanced Viscount turboprops and then the airline's first jet, the DC-8. In later years, Mr. LORIMER became a "check" pilot on the DC-8: His job was to check whether pilots trained on new equipment were good enough to fly them. "To become a check pilot required a combination of competency and seniority," recalled Jack Jones, who was once chief pilot for Air Canada. "Joe was a superb pilot."
Mr. LORIMER experienced one of his most harrowing experiences aboard a DC-8. On a training flight out of Vancouver, lightning knocked a basketball-sized hole in the plane's nose. But Mr. LORIMER managed to land safely.
In 1973, he was loaned to Air Jamaica and lived in Kingston, from where he plied routes back to Canada. He ended his working life flying jumbo jets, his favourite plane. His last run occurred on July 28, 1976, a Toronto-to-Vienna flight that included his entire family. By that time, he had logged 21,676 commercial flying hours.
For many years, Mr. LORIMER lived on a small horse farm in Langley, British Columbia He was a keen golfer and coached a junior curling team that won a national championship. One quirk of his personal life was that he held the longest standing continuous bank account with the Royal Bank. His father had opened it for him when he was born; on his birthday this year, the bank gave him a special commemorative plaque.
His wife died in 1969. In 1977, he married Avon VAN EXAN, the widow of an Air Canada pilot.
Joseph Earl LORIMER was born on July 17, 1916, in Kerrobert, Saskatchewan. He died of age-related causes in Mississauga, Ontario, on September 27, 2006. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, three daughters and three stepchildren.

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