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"McRO" 2006 Obituary


MCROBERT  MCROBERTS  MCRORY  MCROSTIE  MCROW 

McROBERT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-27 published
ULMER, Lillian Gertrude (formerly BROWN)
Peacefully at Bluewater Health Mitton St. Site, Sarnia on Friday, November 24, 2006 Lillian Gertrude ULMER, age 79 of Sarnia. Lillian was a member of the St. Clair Sarnia Optimist Club and longtime member and treasurer of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire Much loved wife of Allan ULMER. Loved mother of Karen CRAMP of Tiverton, Paul BROWN (Monique) of Sarnia and dear stepmother of Trina ULMER (Charles MacKINNON) of Sarnia, Kim ULMER (Kirk DOUGHERTY) of Ottawa, Mike ULMER (Agnes BONGERS) of Hamilton, Jennifer ULMER (Phil GERVAIS) of Ottawa. Loving grandmother of Roy and Wayne CRAMP, Keith and Eric BROWN, Matthew TSAPOITIS, Kyle and Aimee MacKINNON, Megan and Emma DOUGHERTY, Sadie, Hannah and Madalyn ULMER, Wade, Tessa and Grace GERVAIS, great-grandmother of William CRAMP and Gavin MacKINNON. Dear sister of Charles (Florence) McROBERT, Gordon (Doreen) McROBERT, and Don (Mary) McROBERT all of Granton. Predeceased by her first husband Edwin BROWN of London (1970,) a daughter Cheryl BROWN of Uxbridge (2005) and a son-in-law Bill CRAMP of Tiverton (1996.) The funeral service will be held on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. at Redeemer Lutheran Church, 429 Indian Road N. (at Hickory), Sarnia. A graveside service will be held at 3: 30 p.m. at Birr Cemetery, Highway #4, north of London. Family and Friends will be received at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia on Monday afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m. and evening from 7 to 9 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to the Charity of your Choice. Memories and condolences may be sent on line at www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-04 published
McROBERTS, G. Macklin " Mack"
At his late residence, on Friday, March 3, 2006 G. Macklin (Mack) McROBERTS of Bryanston in his 66th year. Dear son of the late Graydon and Ila (CARMICHAEL) McROBERTS. Friends may call at the C. Haskett and son Funeral Home, 223 Main Street, Lucan on Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Monday, March 6th at 11 a.m. with Mr. Peter CARBERRY officiating. Interment Medway Cemetery, Middlesex Centre. Donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com.

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-21 published
McROBERTS, Mack
The family of the late Mack McROBERTS would like to express our thanks to family, Friends and neighbours for their love, support, acts of kindness, food, charitable donations and floral tributes. Thanks to Doctor MEREDITH for his support, Peter CARBERRY for his kind words, and Lynn DEBROUWER for the delicious luncheon. A special and sincere thank you to Bill, Sue and Colin of Haskett Funeral Home for their very professional, kind and dedicated services. Everyone's kindness and thoughtfulness will always be remembered. - The McROBERTS Family.

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-06-17 published
JEFFERY, Violet Emily (née SAMBELL)
At Elmwood Place Retirement Community, London on June 15th, 2006, Violet Emily (SAMBELL) JEFFERY of London in her 95th year. Beloved wife of the late William Earl JEFFERY (1984.) Dear mother of Mary Lois and Bruce COOPER of London, Larry and Jacquie JEFFERY of Aylmer, and David and Sharon JEFFERY of Sutton. Much loved grandmother of Keven JEFFERY and Marika HOE of Boston, Neil JEFFERY and Sonja LEAL of London, Megan Emily JEFFERY and Mark OAKES of London, Andrea JEFFERY and Dave FERRIS of Toronto, Nicole Emily JEFFERY of Sutton. Loving step grandmother of Randy and Marlene ROBINSON of Kingman, Arizona, Rick and Teresa ROBINSON of Phoenix, Arizona and Linda and Richard WEBBER of Salford. Special great-grandmother of Jada Violet LEAL, Felix and Xander OAKES. Survived by her sister Grace ASTLES of Burlington. Predeceased by her parents Francis Poole SAMBELL (1957) and Emily Louisa (RATHBONE) SAMBELL (1924) and 11 siblings: Florence McROBERTS (1975), Francis George (1897), Ethel May (1898), Francis "Frank" (1983), Benjamin (1968), William (1985), Sydney (1981), Mabel OUTRAM (2001,) Henry "Harry" (2001,) Albert (1983) and Herbert (1999). Violet graduated as an R.N. from the Ontario Hospital in London in 1932. She nursed in London, Whitby and Woodstock, before marrying in 1942, and spending 45 years in Dereham Centre. She retired from nursing at Parkwood Hospital in London in 1972. Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Monday, June 19th, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Junior SORZANO officiating. Interment in Mount Elgin Cemetery, Mount Elgin Ontario. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Boys' and Girls' Club of London 184 Horton Street, London, Ontario N6B 1K8 or the charity of your choice. Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca "What thou lovest best is thy true heritage." (Ezra Pound)

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-07-15 published
McROBERTS, Edith Norine (née MacHAM)
Peacefully at the Montfort Hospital, Ottawa, Edith Norine (nee MacHAM,) a dear and gentle soul, slipped quietly into the presence of the Lord Thursday morning, July 13, 2006, at the age of 102. Beloved wife of the late Delmont Ray McROBERTS (predeceased in 1996;) Cherished mother of Patricia Ann FANCY and Robert Allan (Marylyn); "Gram" will be sadly missed by grandchildren Peter FANCY (Natalia), Robin FANCY, Rebecca (Giff SHEARER), Steve McROBERTS (Michelle) and Phil McROBERTS (Libby,) and by great grandchildren, Jared, Laura, Ethan, Jennifer, Victoria, Katie and Grace. Also will be missed by Rick FANCY (Vista,) Eleanor COX and all Edith's Red Hat group. Born on a farm near New Lowell, Ontario before the time when automobiles, electricity, indoor plumbing and telephones became common household amenities, Edith was blessed with wonderful memories and stories from a bygone era. She lived by the deep values and qualities of that era in a godly way before her family and Friends. Edith taught in several rural one-room schools in the 1920s and 1930s, and then in Ottawa area schools after her marriage and while raising a family. She retired in 1968. She was a member of Dominion (later Dominion-Chalmers) United Church for 60 years and was an active member of their Unit 8 ministry group. In her latter years she was known as the oldest member of the Royal Flush chapter of the Red Hat Society and enjoyed many outings with them up to her 102nd birthday in March. Having taught and memorized much of the poetry from the old Ontario readers, she knew well the words of Alfred Lord Tennyson, "The old order changeth, yielding place to new, and God fulfills Himself in many ways, lest one good custom should corrupt the world." This one good custom -- Edith -- has left an indelible mark on all those she touched. Friends may visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa (613-233-1143) on Sunday, July 16, 2006 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held on Monday, July 17, 2006 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment will be held at a later date in Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Condolences/Donations at: mcgarryfamily.ca

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2006-07-19 published
McROBERTS, Edith Norine (née MacHAM)
Peacefully at the Montfort Hospital, Ottawa, Edith, a dear and gentle soul, slipped quietly into the presence of the Lord Thursday morning, July 13, 2006, at the age of 102. Beloved wife of the late Delmont Ray McROBERTS (predeceased in 1996;) Cherished mother of Patricia Ann FANCY and Robert Allan (Marylyn;) "Gram" will be sadly missed by grandchildren Peter FANCY (Natalia,) Robin FANCY, Rebecca (Giff SHEARER), Steve McROBERTS (Michelle) and Phil McROBERTS (Libby,) and by great grandchildren, Jared, Laura, Ethan, Jennifer, Victoria, Katie and Grace. Also will be missed by Rick FANCY (Vista,) Eleanor COX and all Edith's Red Hat group.
Born on a farm near New Lowell, Ontario before the time when automobiles, electricity, indoor plumbing and telephones became common household amenities, Edith was blessed with wonderful memories and stories from a bygone era. She lived by the deep values and qualities of that era in a godly way before her family and Friends.
Edith taught in several rural one-room schools in the 1920s and 1930s, and then in Ottawa area schools after her marriage and while raising a family. She retired in 1968. She was a member of Dominion (later Dominion-Chalmers) United Church for 60 years and was an active member of their Unit 8 ministry group. In her latter years she was known as the oldest member of the Royal Flush chapter of the Red Hat Society and enjoyed many outings with them up to her 102nd birthday in March.
Having taught and memorized much of the poetry from the old Ontario readers, she knew well the words of Alfred Lord Tennyson, "The old order changeth, yielding place to new, and God fulfills Himself in many ways, lest one good custom should corrupt the world." This one good custom - Edith - has left an indelible mark on all those she touched. Friends visited at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa (613-233-1143) on Sunday, July 16, 2006 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Service was held on Monday, July 17, 2006 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment will be held at a later date in Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa. Donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Condolences/donations at: mogarryfamily.ca
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McROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-03 published
McROBERTS, Nora (née KNOWLES)

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-07 published
McROBERTS, Nora (née KNOWLES)

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McROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-03 published
McROBERTS, Nora (née KNOWLES)

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McCRORY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-02-01 published
JEMMETT, George Walter
Passed away peacefully with his family at his side, on January 31st, 2006 at the Groves Memorial Community Hospital in his 60th year. George will be greatly missed by his loving wife of 39 years, Susan (WEIR) and his caring daughters Lisa BARFOOT (Earl) of Owen Sound and Darcie SHEPPERD (Paul.) Loved and cherished by his grandchildren Adam, Brandon, Cale, Brianna, Cody and Eric. Fondly remembered by his brothers and sisters Helen McCRORY (Emmett,) Chuck (Wannie), Carol RAYMOND (Phil), Ken (Betty) and Cliff (Lil). Sadly missed by his nieces, nephews, cousins and many Friends. Friends may call at the Graham A. Giddy Funeral Home and Chapel, 280 St. David St. South in Fergus, on Thursday, February 2nd, 2006 from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Funeral Service to be conducted at Knox Presbyterian Church in Elora, on February 3rd, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m., followed by interment at the Elora Cemetery. Memorial donations can be directed to the Groves Memorial Hospital, Parkinson Foundation or the Heart and Stroke Foundation, cards available at the funeral home, (519) 843-3100. www.grahamgiddyfh.com

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McCROSTIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-03 published
MacCROSTIE, Amy
Suddenly at her home on Wednesday, March 1, 2006, Amy MacCROSTIE of R.R.#5 Goderich in her 84th year. Beloved wife of the late Hugh MacCROSTIE. Dear mother of Annette McKELLAR of Victoria, British Columbia and Dale (Hope) MacCROSTIE of R.R.#4 Kincardine. Loving grandmother of Kyla, Shelagh, Pam and Jeff (Zoe). Sister of Stewart (Leiba) TOLL of London. Sister-in-law of Marie TOLL and Carol MacCROSTIE. Predeceased by brother Aubrey TOLL, sister Marjorie McDOUGALL, brother-in-law Ronald MacCROSTIE and Kenneth McDOUGALL. Friends may call at McCallum and Palla Funeral Home, Goderich on Sunday afternoon from 2-5 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Funeral Home on Monday afternoon at one o'clock. Interment Colborne Cemetery. Donations to Victoria St. United Church or The Heart and Stroke Foundation gratefully acknowledged. Friends may sign the Book of Condolences at www.mccallum-palla.ca

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McROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-18 published
MacROW, William Kempton
Passed away Tuesday, January 17, 2006 at the age of 86. Loving husband and friend of Elizabeth, married 58 years. Predeceased by two brothers (Edward and Chester) and two sisters (Florence and June.) Survived by daughter Joan LOCKETT and her husband Don and granddaughters Leslie FRALEIGH and husband Nathan, and Jennifer LOCKETT, all of Bright's Grove, Ontario. Bill was a veteran of World War 2, 12th Battery, 7th Medium Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery - 1939-1945. He was a retired public servant, Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of National Defense, 1946-1982. Past Master of Ashlar Lodge No. 610; Past Principal, Saint John's Chapter No. 3; Knight's Templar Richard Coeur de Lion No. 4; and member of Mocha Temple Shrine. Member of Springbank Royal Canadian Legion, No. 533, and member of Central United Church, Sarnia. Cremation has taken place. The family will receive Friends on Thursday, January 19th from 7-9 p.m. at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Friday, January 20th at 11: 00 a.m. with the Reverend Dr. Donald LOCKETT officiating. Interment of cremated remains in Woodland Cemetery, London. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. A Masonic service under the auspices of Ashlar Lodge No. 610 Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons will be conducted at the funeral home on Thursday evening at 7 o'clock. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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McCROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-17 published
Lister SINCLAIR: Broadcaster, Playwright (1921-2006)
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation personality and intellectual closely identified with the radio program Ideas loathed being called a Renaissance man, yet excelled at almost everything
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
Toronto -- His voice, writings and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio plays were heard by Canadians for seven decades. In the end, though, Lister SINCLAIR was best known as the man who hosted Ideas for 16 years. Although he was part of a team, listeners thought of Ideas and Lister SINCLAIR as one, since his sense of curiosity and vast knowledge were reflected in the program.
Yet, he was more than that. To an earlier generation, he was the writer of more than 400 feature-length radio plays, and hundreds of other shorter works that ranged from wartime propaganda to children's stories.
In the early days, his plays were as important on radio as documentaries are today. In fact, the American magazine Variety, in describing one of his plays as "boffo," said it was as smoothly written as a documentary.
The play, Hilda Morgan, dealt with a young woman whose fiancé is killed in a car accident. She is pregnant, and her sister suggests an abortion -- without using the actual word. The play caused an uproar in the House of Commons, the type of outrage now reserved for documentaries that carry a definite message. It was Lister SINCLAIR's rule to "always be on the side of the victim."
Whenever reporters wrote about him, they always seemed to mention his age. At first, it was because he was so young for someone to have done so much. "At 27, Lister SINCLAIR is already well known as author, actor, critic, mathematician and linguist," said a publicity blurb in April of 1948.
Two years later, Time ran a piece on the "Bombay-born Lister SINCLAIR, 29, who had three of his original radio scripts dramatized on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Stage 50 last week."
By 1956, it was along the lines of "At 35, Lister SINCLAIR is one of the principal contributors to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's radio and television drama series."
Almost 40 years later, the air of amazement was still evident. In 1995, a profile in The Globe mentioned that, at 74, Mr. SINCLAIR had been at it for 50 years and "shows no signs of slowing down."
While he will always be associated with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mainstream, Mr. SINCLAIR represented a kind of eccentric (he wrote most of his scripts longhand) who was almost a caricature of the professional intellectual. He called himself an "omnibrow," rather than a highbrow.
Over the years, he wrote many books and articles but was best known for the spoken word. With his beautiful voice, he could explain complex ideas in simple sentences.
The first time Canadians heard that voice was when he was acting on radio. Later, he hosted and narrated The Nature of Things he even came up with the name -- when it first went on television. In that same period, he also took a comic turn on Wayne and Shuster, the hugely popular comedy show. There he changed a bit, and chose to sound Canadian. He once described himself as "a pretty good second-rate actor. But unlike first-rate actors like John Drainie, I couldn't turn into someone else."
Lister SINCLAIR had an unusual start in life. He was born in India, but never really knew the place. His father, William SINCLAIR, was a chemical engineer working in India. At 18 months, Lister was sent home to Britain to live with an aunt. Years later, he said perhaps his mother had worried he might come down with tropical diseases.
His English aunt proved to be somewhat overprotective, even cruel. He did not see his parents again until he was 7, when they came home on extended leave. At 8, he was packed off to Colet Court, a boarding school that served as a feeder for the great English public school of Saint Paul's. Though young Lister did poorly at prep school, often coming last in his class, he was clever at math and won a scholarship to Saint Paul's. Among his fellow students were the grandchildren of Sigmund Freud, the family having fled the Nazis to settle in London.
Later in life, he told of a savage beating he suffered for talking back to a matron, a woman who worked at the school. One of the masters, her boyfriend, beat him so badly with a pool cue that he broke a bone at the base of the boy's spine. The master was fired over the incident.
Mr. SINCLAIR was bitter about his lost childhood, having been all but abandoned by his parents, yet never dwelled on it. He understood that, from their point of view, it was a great thing to be educated at one of Britain's top schools. Meanwhile, when he was not away at school, his aunt continued to rule his life and once refused to allow him to go on a supervised scout trip to France.
For all that, his parents did weigh in from time to time. In the summer of 1939, his mother, reassured by a travel agency that there wasn't going to be a war, arrived in England and booked a trip to New York to attend a World's Fair. They sailed on the Normandie, a luxurious French ship that was then the fastest liner on the North Atlantic run, landed in New York to see the fair and then headed for Buffalo, New York They were visiting Niagara Falls as part of a package tour, when Britain declared war on Germany. It was September 3, 1939, and mother and son were stuck on the wrong side of the Atlantic. The father was isolated in India, so the two of them set off for the West, first to Washington state and then north to Vancouver. They travelled by bus.
Mr. SINCLAIR enrolled at the University of British Columbia during his first week in Canada. To his Canadian classmates, he must have appeared rather odd (he walked with a cane and had a strange English accent), and yet at University of British Columbia he made some of his first meaningful Friendships.
"He seemed pretty old and knew everything," said Pierre Berton, a fellow student at University of British Columbia. "We always figured he swotted up on things the night before so he could tell us exactly what it was that Mozart had said to Beethoven. He was a non-stop talker and a very fast reader… he remembered everything he ever read."
Later, Mr. SINCLAIR went to the University Toronto to study for a master's degree and in 1942 he made extra money by teaching math to undergraduates and by acting at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He was part of what became known as the "Vancouver Exodus" of young intellectuals who headed for Toronto during the 1940s.
At the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, he first wrote war propaganda, for there was no question of him joining the war effort. He was lame from a back injury -- not from the beating, but from falling down stairs -- which was why he walked with the aid of at least one cane. One of his first acting jobs was to imitate Germans in such works as Nazi Eyes on Canada. It was narrated by Lorne Greene, the chief announcer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation who was known as the Voice of Doom, and featured actress Helen Hayes.
Mr. SINCLAIR soon began writing plays and he entered a period of great productivity. As a trained mathematician, he liked to say that math and drama had much in common. After all, both were the arrangement of ideas.
In all, he wrote more than 700 radio plays, some very ambitious. One of his favourites was about Socrates, the Greek philosopher.
"Of course he liked it," said a former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation colleague. "He was so much like Socrates -- someone devoted to teaching and talking. Socrates never wrote anything. Lister did, but it is nothing compared to the words he spoke in plays and on Ideas."
After radio, Mr. SINCLAIR moved to television, where he was sought after as a performer as well as a writer. He had to cut his hair, trim his beard and not dress like a bohemian. While many of his radio programs are on tape in the archives, his earlier television programs were broadcast live and vanished, unrecorded.
"I do wish I had more of these things on tape. One thing that I much regret, for example, is a television drama that, in fact, was one of my better television programs. It was called Beethoven. Lorne Greene played Beethoven before he left for Hollywood. But there was no kinescope [copy]. It's completely gone."
Pierre Berton, who died in 2004, told The Globe that Mr. SINCLAIR could have easily joined Lorne Greene and Canadians who went to Hollywood.
"I think he regrets that he didn't go to Broadway in the fifties. There was no theatre here to speak of when he was writing. He wrote wonderful [radio] plays. He got good reviews and an audience."
For a time, Mr. SINCLAIR considered trying his luck in London's West End but instead stayed in Canada, producing and writing a greater variety of material than perhaps anyone else in the country.
"I'm interested in pretty well anything, but finance is low on the list," he told The Globe. "I'm also not very interested in selling." Even though he knew his limitations, that was not enough to stop him from trying what he must have known he was not good at -- running things. Perhaps the strangest period of his long career was a spell in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation management. It read like one of his plays in three acts: the opening farce, the melodrama and the final tragic act.
It all began to unfold in 1968 when Laurent PICARD, an academic who later became dean of the Faculty of Management at McGill University in Montreal, was made an executive vice-president at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. In 1972, Mr. PICARD became president and decided he needed someone creative to run the network's English-language services. He fastened on Lister SINCLAIR and made him executive vice-president of English services.
Suddenly, Mr. SINCLAIR, a man who had never managed more than a small broadcast production, found himself in charge of a vast bureaucracy. A producer had never risen so high the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation hierarchy. "It was a disaster," said one of his Friends. "The rumour was, he went to Coles and bought a book on management. He was not suited to it."
Mr. PICARD soon realized his mistake and conflicts began to erupt. After two years, Mr. SINCLAIR was downgraded to vice-president of program policy and development. Two years later, he was out of management altogether and describing administration as "a branch of anthropology." It was the only period of his life that could be categorized as a failure.
He soon went back to doing what he did best -- writing, performing and producing programs, especially ones that dealt with difficult subjects. He became a frequent guest on Morningside at a time when the host was his friend Don Harron. Together, they did ambitious stuff, such as imaginary tours of 18th-century Venice, complete with the sound effects of oared gondolas.
At an age when many people start to think of retirement, Mr. SINCLAIR took on the job of host of Ideas. For 16 years, he was the voice for more than 2,000 programs, hundreds of which he wrote and produced himself. He was often late for recording sessions and, if the programs were his own scripts, he worked to the last possible deadline.
Mr. SINCLAIR was also a fixture on the program Court of Opinion and helped organize the Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists. Now known as A.C.T.R.A., it represents thousands of Canadian performers.
His private life was sometimes as complex as his professional life. Lister SINCLAIR was married three times, and had several relationships that ran for years. He had two sons from different marriages, remained close to one but was estranged from another. He said he found family life difficult which, given his own formative years, is not surprising.
Soon after settling in Toronto, Mr. SINCLAIR and wife, Alice, whom he had met at University of British Columbia, became part of an artist's community in Kleinberg, north of Toronto.
"The community was called Windrush and the houses were designed by Bill McCROW, who was a set designer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation," said Peter SINCLAIR, a technology entrepreneur who is his son from his first marriage.
Alice SINCLAIR lived in the house until her death and, although Mr. SINCLAIR moved out, he never went far. He made lasting Friendships in Toronto and was elevated to the status of national icon, a characterization he despised right along with the even more loathsome "Renaissance man."
Mr. SINCLAIR shed the awkwardness of youth and became an attractive, middle-aged man. Women were often intensely attracted by his casual style, diffident manner and quick mind. He lost little of his appeal in old age.
He was awarded the Order of Canada in 1985.
Lister Shedden SINCLAIR was born in Bombay on January 9, 1921. He died in hospital in Toronto yesterday. He was 85. He is survived by his sons Peter and Andrew.

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