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"YAK" 2006 Obituary


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YAKABUSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-11 published
SCOTT, Ian Gilmour
On Tuesday, October 10, 2006 at home in Toronto. Born on the 13th of July 1934 in Ottawa. son of the late Audrey GILMOUR and Cuthbert SCOTT; survived by his brothers David, Brian and Christopher SCOTT and his sisters Nancy COLTON and Martha SCOTT, all of Ottawa, and by 15 nephews and nieces: Blair, Tony, Sheila and Sandy SCOTT (David and Alison SCOTT;) Andrew and Mark HAMLIN (Nancy COLTON) Ben, Matthew, Joshua and Katie SCOTT (Brian SCOTT and Monica SAPIANO); James, Will and Ian MURPHY (Martha SCOTT and Brian MURPHY), Aidan and Leah SCOTT (Christopher SCOTT and Sharon HILL). Ian graduated from Saint Michael's College at the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School. He practised law for 35 years with the firm of Cameron, Brewin and Scott and Gowlings. He was the member of the Provincial Legislature for the riding of St. David from 1985 to 1992 and the Attorney General of Ontario from 1985 to 1990. In 1994, Ian suffered a debilitating stroke which he confronted with courage and determination. For a period of 12 years thereafter, until his death, he thrived on the inexhaustible support of his family and his wide circle of Friends and former colleagues. He was predeceased by his partner Kim YAKABUSKI and was supported to the end by his devoted housekeeper Librandina DE SOUSA. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Michael's Cathedral, 200 Church Street, (corner of Shuter and Bond Streets) Toronto, on Friday, October 13 at 10: 30 a.m. A private interment to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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YAKABUSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-11 published
Ian SCOTT, Lawyer And Politician: (1934-2006)
An Ontario politician with the air of a statesman, he was the social conscience of David Peterson's Liberal cabinet, writes Sandra MARTIN. In 1994, he suffered a devastating stroke that left him paralyzed but unbowed
By Sandra MARTIN with files by the late Donn DOWNEY, Page S9
Lawyer, civil-rights advocate and politician, Ian SCOTT had a silver tongue, a prodigious brain and an encompassing empathy. He also faced enormous hardships: His partner died of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and, six months later, he suffered a devastating stroke that robbed him of mobility and his ability to speak. He refused to accept his infirmity and spent the next dozen years retraining his wayward speaking skills with the same determination that he had exerted pleading cases before the court or arguing public policy around the cabinet table or in the Ontario Legislature.
"He was one of the most eloquent speakers, and that was what made the stroke such a cruel twist of fate," said his old friend, Roy McMURTRY, Chief Justice of Ontario. "But he never gave up and he was an inspiration to all of us."
On the public front, he will be remembered as the Ontario attorney-general who, next to the premier himself, put the Liberal stamp on David PETERSON's government between 1985 and 1990, the years when the party spectacularly won, then lost, the reins of power in Ontario. At the time, it was difficult to find an important provincial initiative that did not carry the odour of Mr. SCOTT's all-too frequent cigarettes.
Ian SCOTT was the social conscience of the Liberal cabinet and emerged immediately as a cabinet leader when the Liberals took office with a minority government in 1985. Long before his election as a Liberal, he had had ties with the New Democratic Party, and he combined this with his powers of persuasion to negotiate a deal with the New Democrats that formally ended 43 years of Tory rule in Ontario.
Mr. SCOTT, Mr. PETERSON, Robert Nixon (treasurer) and Sean Conway (education minister) became known as the four horsemen of what started out to be a reform government. He spearheaded the attack on doctors to end extra billing and was the government's counsel against the free-trade agreement. After a period of soul searching, he came out in favour of the Meech Lake constitutional deal, although he was among the first to warn of its weaknesses.
"He was a colossus of provincial politics," said Mr. PETERSON. "He had an intellectual cachet and wit, an advocacy that was second to none, a capacity for very hard work, and he was cunning. He knew how to get what he wanted."
Mr. SCOTT was a superb counsel, one of the best of his generation, said Judge McMURTRY. "He had a marvellous career as a lawyer and contributed greatly politically." Commenting on Mr. SCOTT's accomplishments as attorney- general, Mr. McMURTRY mentioned the merger of county, district and high courts, the process for appointing provincial court judges and his respect for individual and human rights.
During his tenure as attorney-general, Mr. SCOTT "utterly transformed Ontario's justice system, and played an indispensable role in constitutional talks, and otherwise, in the life of his government," current Attorney-General Michael Bryant said in a statement yesterday. "He introduced Ontario's first Freedom of Information Act, brought in North America's first pay equity legislation and created an independent panel to recommend judicial appointments to ensure only the most qualified candidates were appointed to the bench. Mr. SCOTT also amended the Ontario Human Rights Code to prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation."
George Smitherman, Ontario Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, had a more personal observation. "I loved Ian SCOTT. As a politically active gay man coming out in the mid-'80s, he was an inspiration to me. I'll miss being his member of provincial parliament, and I am resigned to never quite filling his shoes. I have lost a friend and it makes me profoundly sad."
Ian Gilmour SCOTT came from a distinguished Irish Catholic family of lawyers and politicians, including Sir Richard SCOTT, a proponent of separate school legislation, a speaker of the Legislative Assembly in Ontario and a cabinet minister in the governments of Edward Blake and Alexander Mackenzie and an influential senator during the Manitoba school debate in the 1890s. The eldest of six children of Ottawa lawyer Cuthbert SCOTT and his wife, Audrey (née GILMOUR,) Mr. SCOTT was born in the middle of the Depression. He went to Holy Cross convent, then Ashbury College.
His younger sister, Martha SCOTT, a fundraising consultant for the private sector, says he always knew he was gay. He never came out to his parents, but she says they probably suspected his sexual orientation. "They adored him, unreservedly," she said yesterday. Nevertheless, Mr. SCOTT admitted in a 1997 interview with Steve Paikin on TVOntario that his homosexuality had forced him to "compartmentalize" his personal and professional lives.
A gifted student, Mr. SCOTT entered Saint Michael's College at the University of Toronto at 17 and graduated with an honours degree in 1955. It was at university, probably in 1951, that he met Roy McMURTRY. "We spent the summer of 1955 working in Quebec City and living with two francophone families, hoping to master the French language," Judge McMURTRY recalled yesterday. "I don't know if either of us achieved our goal, but I think we developed a sensitivity and respect for the cultural and linguistic aspirations of our Québécois Friends, which influenced our future political careers." (In 1975, Roy McMURTRY, as attorney-general, committed Ontario to a bilingual court system; a decade later, Mr. SCOTT "tied up the loose ends" to complete the process.)
Mr. SCOTT graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1959, then articled with William HOWLAND, who was later appointed chief justice of Ontario. A labour lawyer, he formed his own law firm, Cameron, Brewin and Scott, in Toronto and was appointed a Queen's Counsel in 1973. He also taught law at Queen's University (where he earned a masters of law degree), McGill University, the Law Society of Upper Canada and the U of T.
Bob Rae, who followed Mr. PETERSON as premier of Ontario, was Mr. SCOTT's student in a public-sector labour-relations course at the University of Toronto in 1976. "He was funny and engaging as a teacher," Mr. Rae said. "Then I knew him a little bit as a colleague, because we were both labour lawyers and he supported me financially when I ran federally in 1978."
Despite not being with a long-established Bay Street firm, Mr. SCOTT assembled an impressive list of clients, including the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. He was also the counsel for several high-profile public inquiries, acting for the Hospital for Sick Children during the Grange inquiry and counsel to the Commission of Inquiry into Certain Disturbances at Kingston Penitentiary, the Attorney-General's Task Force on Legal Aid and the royal commission into development of the Mackenzie Valley.
In 1981, he ran for the provincial Liberals against Margaret Scrivener in the riding of St. David, losing by just over 1,000 votes. He ran again in 1985 in a marquee contest against Julian Porter, a libel lawyer, chairman of the Toronto Transit Commission and scion of a prominent legal and political family in Ontario. This time, Mr. SCOTT won, the first Liberal to be elected in St. David in almost 50 years.
Mr. PETERSON, who had won the election with only 37.9 per cent of the vote, forged an alliance with Mr. Rae's New Democrats (which had received 23.8 per cent) to form what was called the Accord government. Mr. SCOTT served as attorney-general (succeeding Roy McMURTRY, who had held the post from 1975 to 1985 during William Davis's tenure as Conservative premier) until the Liberals were defeated by the New Democratic Party in 1990.
"He had consummate confidence in his own skills and abilities to persuade people to do what he wanted them to do, only because he was one of the greatest lawyers in the country," said Mr. PETERSON. "He could talk you into anything." He also liked the tension of public life, according to Mr. PETERSON, and he was steeped in a tradition of public service.
"To run a government," Mr. PETERSON said, "you need three guys a premier, a treasurer and an attorney-general." Mr. SCOTT, he said, "had an awful lot of influence" because of "his ability to speak, his advocacy, his passion, his Friendship with me." He "had his nose into every corner of that government because he was passionately interested in the policy issues and he was up to speed and he made contributions. He was a key guy at the cabinet table. People didn't trifle with him."
Sunday shopping, freedom of information, welfare changes and auto insurance all passed before Mr. SCOTT's tortoise-shell bifocals. Many New Democratic Party reforms, including changes to the court system, family law, native government and employment equity, were initiated under Mr. SCOTT's tenure as attorney-general. His portfolio also included responsibility for native affairs and women's issues, but he kept abreast of laws being drafted in all ministries, arguing that the province's chief law officer had to know the legal ramifications of any particular piece of legislation. One of his roles was to argue successfully before the Supreme Court in favour of protecting separate schools, in much the same way that his ancestor, Sir Richard, had done in the 19th century.
"He was a wonderful colleague, he was interested in everything, he was into everything," said Mr. Conway, a former cabinet colleague. "He was an outstanding attorney-general because he was an outstanding lawyer. He had a unique combination of sparkling intelligence and a wonderful curiosity."
Mr. SCOTT held on to his seat in the 1990 provincial election, but he didn't relish the opposition benches. He resigned in September of 1992 and returned to practising law at Gowling, Strathy and Henderson. Martha, his sister, said "he went into politics with an agenda, including law reform, and when he had accomplished that, he got out."
A confirmed smoker who had tried to kick the habit many times, he finally succeeded by wearing a nicotine patch. His partner, Kim YAKABUSKI, died of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in 1993. In 1994, Mr. SCOTT suffered a devastating stroke that left him paralyzed on his right side and suffering from severe aphasia. The medical experts thought he would end up in an institution, but "he wasn't interested in that life," said his sister.
He insisted on going home, persuaded his cleaning woman to come every day to get him dressed, and worked doggedly with speech therapist Bonnie BERESKIN, who not only taught him how to speak again but trained a key group of his legal colleagues and cronies (including Stephen Goudge, Ian Rolland and Chris Paliare) to work with him every day on his speaking skills. He recovered about 20 per cent of his speech and expanded his communication skills to include facial expressions, hisses, nods and telling looks.
"Here was a guy who had absolutely everything -- school was a snap and work was a snap," said Martha SCOTT. " You don't really imagine a person who has everything would have the resilience to deal with that kind off bad luck." Her brother, she said, was determined to reclaim as much of his life as possible. "I worked my ass off," he once said about his post-stroke recovery in a sentence remarkable for its length and its passion.
"Our Friendship grew after his stroke," Mr. Rae said. "He had a lot of guts and determination and he lived his live with panache right to the end. The greatest affliction that you can imagine for an advocate and an orator like Ian is losing the capacity of speech, but even then he had a way of communicating that was totally disarming. Occasionally, he would only be able to say yes or no, but he could take in everything and he used his eyebrows and his sense of humour [to communicate]."
Mr. SCOTT collaborated with Neil McCORMICK on a memoir, To Make A Difference, in 2001. He continued to have lunch with Friends in restaurants, using a scooter to get about town, and to attend the symphony. But, in the past couple of years, his health problems increased and he finally decided to let nature take its inevitable course.
Ian Gilmour SCOTT was born in Ottawa on July 13, 1934. He died in his sleep in Toronto yesterday after refusing treatment for a variety of illnesses, including cancer. He was 72. Predeceased by his partner, Kim YAKABUSKI, he leaves his five siblings and their families. The funeral will be held at Saint Michael's Cathedral in Toronto at 10: 30 a.m. on Friday.

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YAKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-23 published
BONDI, Wilma Lorraine (née WOODCOCK)
Peacefully, after a long illness, at Eagle Terrace, Newmarket, on Saturday, April 22, 2006. Wilma BONDI, beloved wife of the late John (1995). Dear mother of Judy (Boris), and John and his wife Ruth. Loving Grandma to Michelle BONDI and David SKELCHER. Sister of Merle FORHAN, Jeanne PEMBERTON, Hazel WALLEN (Murray), Verna WYATT, Marjorie GILPIN, Larry, and the late Rena YAKE, Howard, Ken, Bob and Doris TILT. She will be sadly missed by her many nieces, nephews and Friends. Friends may call at the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, 157 Main St. South, Newmarket on Monday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Tuesday at 2 p.m., followed by interment at Saint_John's Cemetery. Donations may be made in Wilma's memory to Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation, Newmarket, or the Alzheimer Society of York Region.

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YAKELEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-15 published
YAKELEY, Lloyd
Passed away peacefully on March 14, 2006 at the Versa Care Centre in Uxbridge, in his 77th year. Beloved husband of Bonnie for 52 years. Dear father of Joseph (Deborah,) and Nancy SANGUINETTI. Proud grandfather of Chad and Abby YAKELEY, Nicholas and Julianna SANGUINETTI. Survived by his brothers Delbert, Garnet and sisters Ruby MILLER, Beatrice JAMES, Betty WINTERSTEIN, Marion YAKELEY and Marjorie KEETCH. Predeceased by his brothers Bill, Oliver and Ernest. Family and Friends will be received at the Low and Low Funeral Home, 23 Main Street South, Uxbridge (905-852-3073) for visitation on Thursday, March 16, 2006 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service to be held on Friday, March 17, 2006 at 1 p.m. in the chapel. Interment Goodwood Cemetery. In Lloyd's memory, donations to the Multiple Sclerosis Society would be appreciated.

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YAKIROV o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-10 published
Anita JARVIS, Biochemist And Dermatologist (1929-2006)
As a teenager, she escaped the Communist regime in Hungary and came to Canada as an indentured servant, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S13
A brilliant student who fled Hungary during the Communist regime in a pair of high-heeled shoes and came to Canada as an indentured servant, Anita JARVIS was a biochemist and a medical researcher before becoming a leading dermatologist in Toronto.
"There are people who are naturally larger than life and she was one of them," said her younger brother, Ivan FELLEGI, a former refugee and now chief statistician of Canada. "She saved my life many times and she saved my daughter's life," he said.
In 1963, Doctor FELLEGI's infant daughter had had diarrhea for six weeks and was wasting away. She had celiac disease, a syndrome that was not well known or understood 40 years ago. It was Doctor JARVIS who deduced that the baby had a gluten intolerance. "She was always so well read about aspects of medicine she didn't even practise," he said.
A devoted and inspiring mother to her own children, Doctor JARVIS also embraced more than half a dozen young women as "adopted" daughters, inviting them to use her house as a second home, offering them advice on all aspects of their lives, encouraging them to further their educations and, with her husband's help, often supplying funds for tuition and other necessities.
Tall, elegant and slim, her blond hair always perfectly coiffed, she never left the house without her pearl necklace and earrings, whether she was setting out for a power walk in the morning or a performance of the opera or theatre in the evening.
Anita Agnes FELLEGI was grew up in Szeged, Hungary, the elder of two children of Andrew and Barbara FELLEGI. Her father owned a stone-finishing factory that made monuments, tombstones and building facades; her mother was the daughter of a wealthy landowning family, although most of the family estates had been lost in the peace settlements after the First World War. Anita and Ivan were raised with governesses and servants and spent summers on the River Tisza, swimming and boating.
Anita grew up speaking German and English, as well as Hungarian, and later learned French. Always in awe of his brilliant older sister, Doctor FELLEGI remembers how she told him, when she was 17 and he was 11, that if he didn't want to be a "street bum" he should put away adventure stories and start reading the classics. She suggested he start with The Royal Game, a short novel by Stefan Zweig, which remains "one of the most beautiful books I have ever read," he said. "I was hooked on classical literature from then on, so if I am an intellectual these days, I can thank my sister for it."
The FELLEGIs survived the Red Army's invasion of Hungary at the end of the Second World War and prospered, after a fashion, during the pseudo-democratic regime the Soviets allowed from 1945 to 1947, before the Stalinist crackdown. Anita, who was studying chemistry at the University of Budapest, couldn't tolerate the official lies and hypocrisy and talked to her parents about fleeing to Austria. Her father was unwilling to leave his aged mother, and her mother was unable to leave her husband, so Anita, 19, made her own plans to leave in February, 1949, telling nobody except Ivan, who was then 13.
She and a male friend pretended to be betrothed lovers so that they could visit his family, who lived in the restricted border region adjacent to Austria. She left home decked out in jewellery, high-heeled shoes, three pairs of stockings, and carrying her best clothes in two suitcases -- as though determined to impress her future in-laws. She met her little brother to say goodbye and gave him her jewellery to take back home. Her friend then escorted her across the heavily guarded border. To this day, her brother wishes he had persuaded his sister to keep the jewels so that she could have sold them in Austria to support herself.
She made her way to Vienna and then to Innsbruck, where she was awarded some scholarships based on her sterling academic transcripts from Budapest. Her father also managed to send her some money via a courier. Two years later, she applied to immigrate to Canada, which, in 1951, meant pledging to serve as a domestic servant for two years.
In Montreal, her ability to speak four languages immediately attracted the attention of Gaspard Fauteux (who had been appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec in October, 1950) and his wife Marguerite (who was suddenly chatelaine of a large household in Quebec City). The Fauteuxs quickly learned that their new maid knew nothing about cooking, cleaning, laundry or housekeeping.
One of her first tasks was to iron Mr. Fauteux's white dress trousers so he could wear them to his inaugural ball. She scorched the seat and, following the enterprising suggestion of her employer's children (who were already fond of the new maid), camouflaged the burn marks with chalk. Of course, the chalk wore off and Mr. Fauteux unwittingly walked around for much of the evening with a big brown mark on the back of his pants.
All was forgiven. In fact, after about six weeks as a maid, the family, recognizing her intelligence, used its influence to release her from her indentureship. She found a job as a lab technician at a pharmaceutical company while continuing to study for her degree at night at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia). At a night class in German literature, she met her future husband, Gregory JARVIS. (The son of a Russian father and a German mother, he was born Gregorij YAKIROV in Berlin in 1921, was sent to England just before the Second World War and was subsequently evacuated to Canada.) The professor, recognizing their proficiency, excused them both from classes, and Gregory invited her to have a cup of coffee with him. They talked for the next five hours. "We couldn't get enough of each other. I knew that night that this was the woman of my life," he said. They were married in 1952. Neither the bride nor the groom had any family in Canada. The witnesses: were poet Irving Layton, their neighbour in Côte St.…Luc, and forensic pathologist Fred Jaffe.
Their daughter Ingrid was born in 1954, as Mrs. JARVIS was completing her undergraduate degree in chemistry. The family moved to Ottawa that September so that Mr. JARVIS, who by then had an engineering degree, could study medicine at the University of Ottawa. Her husband used to tell her jokingly that half of his M.D. belonged to her because he relied on her biochemistry notes, which were so much more concise and precise than his own.
Meanwhile, Anita enrolled in a PhD program in biochemistry, but switched to medicine in 1955, graduating summa cum laude in 1959, three weeks after her second daughter Arianna (now a psychologist practising in Vancouver) was born. Doctor JARVIS's brother Ivan came to Canada as a refugee after the Hungarian Revolution in 1956 and her parents managed to escape in 1959.
After Doctor JARVIS finished her internship, she and her husband moved to Toronto in 1960, with no money and two kids, so that he could do a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Toronto. This being the era of heavy nuclear testing, she immediately found a research job in the Department of Physiological Hygiene, working on the health impacts of radioactive fallout in mother's milk, air quality and soil. She also began working toward a PhD in radiation chemistry (combining her background in biochemistry and her new interest in radiation).
Dr. JARVIS published nearly 20 referred papers in academic journals, but encountered serious problems with her academic supervisor. He was treating her as an unpaid assistant, expecting her to write his lectures, presenting her research as his own and claiming her grant money, according to Doctor JARVIS's husband.
The situation became so intolerable that she left research and qualified as a dermatologist. She practised this new profession for the next 30 years, eventually inviting Doctor Peter HACKER, a Hungarian dermatologist she had met in Ottawa, to join her and, latterly, her older daughter Ingrid, who qualified as a dermatologist in 1983.
"She was an inspiring role model," her daughter said, joking that she got medicine along with mother's milk. As a teenager, she would go to her mother's medical office after school to do her homework -- and to have help with chemistry, math and physics. "She made everything fun."
While working with one's mother always presents "control issues," Dr. JARVIS says she found it easy, and an excellent learning experience. "She was a very good surgeon and I would pick up tips from her, because what makes you a good dermatologist is practice."
For the past three decades, Doctor JARVIS suffered from migraines on an almost daily basis. They varied in severity from bearable to "killer," as she described the worst ones. Her brother thinks her headaches may have been the beginning of a process that precipitated a seizure that caused her to fall into a coma on January 17, 2005. There has never been a definite diagnosis, although Doctor JARVIS's husband says one neurologist labelled his wife's condition as Hashimoto's encephalopathy, a rare brain disorder first described in 1966, ironically by a Doctor Brain.
Twice over the next 18 months, she emerged slightly from the coma, before she finally succumbed to pneumonia. "Rationally, I knew she would not recover after being in a coma for one year," said her brother, the statistician, "but while she was still alive there was always hope for a miracle."
Anita Agnes Fellegi JARVIS was born in Szeged, Hungary, on May 20, 1929. She died in Toronto on June 25 of pneumonia after a long illness. She was 77. She is survived by her husband, Doctor Gregory JARVIS, her daughters Ingrid and Arianna, two grand_sons and her brother Ivan FELLEGI and his family.

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YAKIWCHUK o@ca.on.brant.brantford.the_expositor 2006-03-10 published
DANKS, Beverley Jean (née GREVILLE)
Passed away suddenly on March 6, 2006 in her 49th year. Predeceased by her husband William Lee DANKS. Survived by her sons Michael YAKIWCHUK and Luke DOXTATOR and grandchildren Jayde, Julian, Sebastian, and Chloe. Also survived by many other family and Friends. Friends are invited to join the family for a celebration of her life on Sunday, March 12, 2006 at the Knight's of Columbus Hall, 12 Catharine Avenue Brantford. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Hill and Robinson Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 30 Nelson Street.

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YAKUBOWICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-11 published
SMITH, Joan Rebecca (née CRAWFORD)
Suddenly on Saturday, July 8, 2006 at Trillium Health Centre - Mississauga at age 73. Joan, beloved wife of Wilson for 36 years. Dear sister of Donna RAMSEY and her husband Sam of Sarnia. Sister-in-law of Peggy YAKUBOWICH of Virgil, Ontario. She will be fondly remembered by her nieces, nephews and their families and sadly missed by her beloved pet "Jazz". At Joan's request, a private service will be held with a public celebration of life service to be held in the fall of 2006 with details to be announced. If desired, a donation in Joan's memory may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society.

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