SCHRIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
HARDING, Jack
The family of the late Jack HARDING wish to express their heartfelt thanks and sincere gratitude to our family, Friends, and neighbours for their support and expressions of sympathy during our recent loss. Special thanks to Doctor Gil SCHRIER, Nurses and Doctors at the Palliative Care Unit, Victoria Hospital for their wonderful care and compassion. Special thanks to Rev. Earl LEISKA, the Memorial Funeral Home and staff, and our Pallbearers.

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SCHROEDER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
SMITH, Anne Marie (née SCHROEDER)
(formerly of London, Dixie and Campbellville). Peacefully at home, in Peterborough, on Tuesday, January 09, 2007. Anne was born January 16, 1928 in Dashwood, Ontario. Beloved wife of Frederick SMITH for almost 57 years. Cherished Mom of Lynda CLARK of Peterborough and Tom SMITH and his wife Vicki of Windsor. She was Grams or Annie to her grandchildren Jessica and Heather PALLETT, Adam, Erik and Amanda SMITH and great-grandchildren Andrew and Ryan. Dear sister of Harold and his wife Jean, Jacob and his wife Patricia and the late Hubert and his wife Audrey. Sister-in-law of Ethel and Doug HOGG, Carole Ann and Frank DICKER, Jack BAXTER and his late wife Jeanne, Bert HAGGIS and his late wife Phyllis and the late Ellen and her husband Bill McGIBBON. She will be fondly remembered by her many nieces and nephews and her many special Friends. Visitation will take place on Friday, January 12, 2007, from 1: 00 p.m. till the time of the service at 3:00 p.m. in the chapel of Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough, (705) 745-4683. In lieu of flowers memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated by Anne's family.

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SCHUCHARDT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-01 published
SCHUCHARDT, Henry Karl
After a brief illness at the North York General Hospital on Tuesday October 30, 2007 at the age of 82 years. Beloved husband of Doris. Much loved father of Camillo (Joni) son Mario, Karl and daughter Jasmine. Dear grandfather to Elise, Cam, Coreen, Travis and Skyler and great-grandfather to Detlin, Ryan and Ella.
Henry is survived by his sister-in-law Christiane and her husband Saki VATTIS and family.
A funeral service will be held in the chapel of The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre, 275 Lesmill Road., Toronto 416-441-1580 on Saturday November 3, 2007 at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of Henry to either the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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SCHUHBAUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-16 published
GERL, Sister Mary (Sister Mary Aelred) C.S.J.
Peacefully at Saint_Joseph's Motherhouse on Sunday, July 15, 2007. Predeceased by her parents Joseph GERL and Katharina MEMINGER, her sisters Sophia GERL and Therese SCHUHBAUM and her brother Albert. Lovingly remembered by her nephew Joseph GERL of Niederbayern, Germany and several cousins. Visitation at Saint_Joseph's Convent, 3377 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, from 3: 00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 17, 2007 for Vigil Service at 7: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial on Wednesday, July 18, 2007 at 10: 30 a.m. followed by Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery.

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SCHUHMACHER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-31 published
KAMPERT, Jeannette (HENDRIKSEN)
At Summit Place in Owen Sound Wednesday afternoon August 29, 2007. The former Jeannette HENDRIKSEN of R.R.#2, Allenford in her 80th year. Beloved wife of Cornelis KAMPERT. Loving mother of Theo and his wife Ruth and Jacob all of R.R.#2, Allenford and Thea and her husband Thys SCHUHMACHER of Arizona. Lovingly remembered by her five grandchildren; Marina KAMPERT, B.J., Mandy, Cole and Amanda two SCHUHMACHER. Dear sister of Bertus HENDRIKSEN and his wife Appia of Holland. Predeceased by one granddaughter Amanda and two brothers. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Monday evening September 3rd from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from the First Christian Reform Church, Owen Sound Tuesday morning at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Expressions of remembrance to Timothy Christian School would be appreciated. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Jeannette by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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SCHUILENBERG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-04 published
BYSMA, Martha Marie (TUINSTRA)
Gone to be with her Lord at Bluewater Health Palliative Care on Wednesday, January 3, 2007, Martha Marie (TUINSTRA) BYSMA, age 85 of Sarnia. Beloved wife of the late Albert BYSMA (1991.) Loving mother of Gerry BYSMA and his wife Pauline, the late Audrey (1993) and her husband Kees SCHUILENBERG, Henry BYSMA and his wife Lena, Rita and her husband Bert DORGELOOS and Margaret and her husband Eugene BUTT. Dear grandmother of 17 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. The funeral service will be held on Saturday, January 6, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. at Redeemer Christian Reformed Church, 5834 Blackwell Sd. Rd., Sarnia (off London Line). Interment in Resurrection Cemetery. Family and Friends will be received on Friday afternoon from 2 to 4 and evening from 7 to 9 p.m. at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. Memorial donations may be made to the C.R.W.R.C. or the Canadian Cancer Society. Memories and condolences may be sent on line to www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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SCHULTETUS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-11 published
Trucker dies hours after crash
By Joe BELANGER, Sun Media, Tues., December 11, 2007
A Missouri trucker, apparently unhurt when his transport truck and another rig collided, died two hours later when he collapsed alongside Highway 402 and couldn't be revived.
Middlesex Ontario Provincial Police said a truck hauling glass was struck from behind by another transport truck hauling furniture at 2: 44 a.m. on Highway 402, near Longwoods Road at Delaware just west of London.
A passenger in the furniture truck, Christopher SCHULTETUS, 27, of Michigan, was asleep in the berth and taken to the London Health Sciences Centre with injuries that weren't life-threatening.
The driver of the furniture truck, Bradley SCHULTETUS, 26, of Michigan, wasn't hurt.
Police said the driver of the glass transport, Thomas HART, 52, of Missouri, was also apparently unhurt.
But HART collapsed on the side of the highway about two hours after the collision.
Ontario Provincial Police officers at the scene performed cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and the man was taken by ambulance to London Health Sciences Centre where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy was to be take place in London.
The Ontario Provincial Police's technical collision investigators were trying to determine what happened.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-15 published
SCHULTZ, Ruth Ellen (BLACKLOCK)
Peacefully at Lee Manor in Owen Sound Thursday morning June 14, 2007. The former Ruth BLACKLOCK of Wiarton in her 73rd year. Beloved wife of the former Police Chief of Wiarton, the late Alfred SCHULTZ. Loving mother of Paul and his wife Gayle of Kincardine, Steve and his wife June of Bowmanville, Jim and his wife Lynn of North Bay, Rick and his wife Donna of Waterloo, Gary of Owen Sound, Brian and his wife Mary-Lou of Kitchener, Pete and his wife Barb of Owen Sound, Dean of Etobicoke and Bryce of Waterloo. Lovingly remembered by fourteen grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Survived by two brothers; Doug and Sheldon BLACKLOCK. Predeceased by her daughter Carol. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Funeral Home Monday morning at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Bayview Cemetery, Wiarton. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer Society or the Wiarton Hospital would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Ruth by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-24 published
SCHULTZ, Ruby Margaret (BUMSTEAD)
Peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services in Meaford on Saturday December 22, 2007. The former Ruby Margaret BUMSTEAD of Meaford, in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Hugh J. SCHULTZ (1988.) Dear mother of Peggy SCHARF (Lester;) Kathy HORN (Del;) Lorraine JAGO (Bob) all of Nanaimo, British Columbia; Ross SCHULTZ (Isabel) of Meaford; John SCHULTZ (Laura) of Desboro; Donna SPEIDEL (Wayne) of Nanaimo, British Columbia; David SCHULTZ (Brenda) of Meaford Bawn CLARK (Bob) of Owen Sound; Betty WHITTINGTON (Don) of Toronto Charlie SCHULTZ (Jan;) Linda BOWINS (Leonard) all of Meaford Joanne JONES of Hamilton; Sandra GREEN (Ted) of Latchford; and Paul SCHULTZ (Judy) of Meaford. Fondly remembered by 39 grandchildren, 43 great-grandchildren and 1 great-great-grandchild and a sister, Laura BARFOOT. Predeceased by daughters Dorothy WILLAN and Eleanor SMOOK, a son Roger SCHULTZ, brothers Wilmer, Earl, Jim, Percy, Gordon, Walter, sisters Mary WILSON and Eleanor MOULTON and an infant sister Jessie. Also survived by sons-in-law Jim WILLAN and Gene SMOOK and a brother-in-law Ken. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, Meaford on Sunday afternoon from 2 until 5 p.m. Funeral services will be conducted at Meaford United Church on Monday December 24th at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Judith OLIVER officiating. A private family service of interment will follow at Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-09 published
ROSE, Mary " May" L. (née McKENNA)
Peacefully at London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital on Sunday, January 7, 2007, Mary "May" L. ROSE (née McKENNA) of London in her 79th year. Beloved wife of Donald ROSE (1997.) Dear mother of Donald ROSE (Debbie,) Rick ROSE (Heather,) Beverley SCHULTZ (Brad) and Heather ROSE. Loving grandmother of Justin, Tiffany, Eileen, Jennifer, Kimberley, Cassandra and Joshua and great-grandmother of Brenden and Mia. Also survived by her brothers William McKENNA, Thomas McKENNA (Kate) and her sisters Rena WILSON and Elizabeth LACEY (Allan) and sister-in-law Elsie. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her grand_son Trevor and brothers John and James (Mabel). Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, January 9th at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 at 1 p.m. with Major Gary VENABLES officiating. Interment in Woodland Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy donations may be made to Salvation Army Citadel, 555 Springbank Drive, London N6J 1H3, Canadian Cancer Society, 123 St. George Street, London N6A 3A1, and London Health Sciences Foundation - University Hospital, 747 Baseline Road East, London N6C 2R6. Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-10 published
Charmion KING, Actress: (1925-2007)
The grande dame of Canadian theatre was known for her dynamic stage presence, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
In a career that spanned 60 years on stage, radio, television and film, Charmion KING was known for her dynamic stage presence, her throaty laugh, her beauty, her dedication to the theatre, and her professionalism. Of all playwrights she loved Chekhov the best and no wonder, for she delivered many of her best performances in his work.
"She was the grande dame of Canadian Theatre," Albert SCHULTZ, artistic director of The Soulpepper Theatre in Toronto, said yesterday. Ms. KING joined the company in its third season (2000) to play a character in Noël Coward's Present Laughter. "We needed one of those great dames who could come on stage and convince you that she could function under a couple of martinis and be as witty as the next person in the room and bring with her a great aristocratic bearing and great wit and elegance -- and that was Charm," he said.
The only child of Charles KING, a businessman who worked for Neilsen's (and was called The Candy Man, according to his granddaughter Leah) and his wife Amabel (née REEVES,) Charmion KING spent her earliest years in The Beach area of Toronto in a house fronting the boardwalk. Even as a five-year-old, she dreamed of becoming an actress. After the family moved to Forest Hill, she attended Bishop Strachan, the private girls' school, where she often played male roles in plays. In the summers she went to Tanamakoon, the girls' camp where the late Dora Mavor Moore had begun teaching musical theatre in the 1930s.
She enrolled in University College at the University of Toronto in the early 1940s, where she acted in college productions. In 1944, The Globe and Mail reported that she had been offered a screen test by Warner Brothers after talent scouts for the film studio had seen her perform in Thunder Rock. The 19-year-old star of the University College Players' Guild had declined, saying "this is just a school play."
Her best work was probably done at the Hart House Theatre under the direction of Robert GILL, an American actor who had worked at the Cleveland Playhouse. At the time, only men were allowed to use Hart House, the recreational and athletic facility that had been given to the university by the Massey family, but the theatre was run by a different administration, one that welcomed women on its stage after the war.
Mr. GILL, who headed Hart House Productions, was an "enormous influence," Ms. KING told Susan LAWRENCE in 2002 for an article in the University of Toronto magazine. "He taught me professional behaviour as an actress." In her most memorable role at university, she played the title role in Saint Joan at Hart House Theatre in 1947, the year she graduated. "Her performance of Joan," The Globe and Mail critic wrote the following morning, according to Hart House records, "is a luminous portrayal, instinct with an inner fire of truth and spiritual beauty, and exquisite in its shadings of emotion and execution."
From Hart House and a year of graduate work in English literature, she did summer stock in New York, and then helped found the Straw Hat Players in 1948 with Murray and Donald DAVIS, two brothers who had been part of the Hart House theatre gang. The company, which included Eric HOUSE, Ted FOLLOWS and Barbara HAMILTON, toured Muskoka and Port Carling and the border region of the U.S. for several summers. "In a way it was the best time I ever had on the stage," Ms. KING told The Globe in 1961. "We were 10 ambitious, idealistic youngsters who thought we were building Canadian theatre and, perhaps, we were."
The DAVIS brothers and their sister Barbara CHILCOTT went on to open The Crest Theatre in a renovated cinema on Mount Pleasant Road in Toronto in 1954. At The Crest she played Masha (with Kate Reid) in Chekhov's The Three Sisters, Madame Ranevskaya in The Cherry Orchard and Lady Utterword in Heartbreak House, among other roles in that theatre's ambitious and groundbreaking history.
She worked in England in the very early 1950s but returned to Canada to work in television on the fledgling Canadian Broadcasting Corporation network and at the equally neophyte Stratford Festival, appearing as Hermione in The Winter's Tale and Lady Percy in Henry IV, Part 1 in 1958. (She returned to the Festival in 1982 as a senior member of the Shakespeare 3 company and acted in All's Well That Ends Well and A Midsummer Night's Dream.)
The following year she performed on Broadway in Robertson Davies's Love and Libel, directed by Tyrone Guthrie, and toured in a principal role in Love and Libel in Detroit, Boston and New York.
In 1962, she went back to The Crest to play opposite a Newfoundland actor named Gordon PINSENT in The Madwoman of Chaillot. They married on November 2 of that year, a creative and romantic partnership that lasted more than 44 years. After her wedding, Ms. KING told The Toronto Star that she "was doing Orpheus Descending at the Crest and when it ended I said I didn't want to work for a long, long time. I was tired." Their daughter, actress Leah PINSENT, was born on September 20, 1968. The family moved to Los Angeles in the 1970s where Mr. PINSENT (after the end of the television show Quentin Durgens, M.P., in which he had starred) was writing and finding backers for his film The Rowdyman.
"She was my best friend," Leah PINSENT said yesterday about her mother. "Other than when I had to go away, we talked every day. She was giving and kind and warm and funny and smart and a great cook."
After having retired for most of a decade to spend more time as a wife and mother, Ms. KING ended her self-imposed retreat by appearing in the Ethel Barrymore role in The Royal Family, a comedy by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber, at the Shaw Festival in 1972.
She performed steadily after that on television and radio (playing Aunt Josephine on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's Anne of Green Gables and appearing on The Newsroom, Twitch City and Wind at My Back, and playing the voice of Mrs. Gruenwald in the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio series Rumours and Boarders). She appeared in film (Who Has Seen the Wind? and Nobody Waved Goodbye) and on stage, notably as Jessica Logan, a temperamental actress trying to make a comeback, in the premiere production of David French's showbusiness comedy Jitters in Toronto and at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven in 1979, a role that she revived in Toronto in 1986.
In 1990, she again performed opposite Kate Reid in a Hart House revival of Arsenic and Old Lace. In 1998 she starred in the Tarragon Theatre production of Janet Munsil's Emphysema (A Love Story) in which she shared the stage with her daughter Leah, as they both played actress Louise Brooks at different ages. Although Ms. KING had been a heavy smoker, she had successfully stopped for a decade until the director asked them to smoke "real" cigarettes on stage, according to her daughter. Alas, she was hooked again.
Ms. PINSENT said it was "fabulous" working with her mother because she was "always a very generous woman. There was no ego; she always wanted to serve the writer and the theatre in the best way she possibly could."
In the last several years Ms. KING performed regularly at The Soulpepper Theatre in Toronto, appearing in Present Laughter in 2001, as Maria in Chekhov's Uncle Vanya and in Jean Genet's The Maids in 2002. "We called her at home and we got her," Mr. SCHULTZ said about casting her for the first time. "She always brought such humanity and elegance and wit to everything she did. She was a pleasure to have around."
Asked a few years ago by an interviewer whether she could imagine retiring, Ms. KING said absolutely not. "Being an actor is something like being at university. It opens your mind and your soul and makes you tap into yourself." Her last role was as Mrs. Soames in Thornton Wilder's Our Town at Soulpepper in 2006 and she was planning to reprise the role this spring.
"To the very end, Charm stood up for the creative arts in Canada," her family said in a statement this week. She was a steadfast believer in the creative spirit of this country, its culture&hellip her cry was always… get on with it and be proud."
Charmion KING was born in Toronto on July 25, 1925. She died in Toronto of complications from emphysema on Saturday. She was 81. She is survived by her husband Gordon PINSENT, her daughter Leah PINSENT and her son-in-law Peter KELEGHAN. There will be a private family cremation, followed by a memorial service at a later date.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-28 published
'He became effortless in his greatness'
It was his experience under fire as an army medic serving in Italy during the Second World War that imbued him with a spiritual appreciation of humanity, writes Sandra MARTIN. He would later draw on it as one of Canada's finest classical actors
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
A man who could command a stage in any country and who chose to make his career in Canada, William HUTT was a formidable presence at the Stratford Festival since its founding in 1953, appearing in myriad roles from Prospero, Lear and Falstaff to Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being Earnest. For fans, he made Shakespeare accessible, speaking in his homegrown voice rather than adopting plummy tones from across the Atlantic. For actors, he was a mentor, a friend and an avuncular presence, showing them how to inhabit a stage without hogging the limelight. And he did it all with generosity and panache. The stage was his home, and no stages were more familiar to him than those at Stratford, where he performed in 130 productions over 39 seasons.
"This is a historic moment in Canadian arts," Richard MONETTE, artistic director of the festival, said in an interview. "It is a cause of mourning for this loss and also a cause of great celebration because of his legacy. He was a great classical actor and he essayed all the great roles. He was equally at home with crowds as well as kings. He had a great range, everybody in the audience could relate to him - whether they were society people or farmers, he could appeal to them. He became effortless in his greatness."
William Ian deWitt HUTT was the middle of three children of Edward deWitt HUTT, a magazine editor, and Caroline Frances Havergal (née WOOD.) His mother suffered from septicemia after his birth, and was soon pregnant with her third child. Consequently, he spent long periods of time with an aunt and uncle in Hamilton. "My aunt belonged to Christ Church and they were doing a Christmas pageant. I was only 4 or 5 years old, but I wanted to be in it," he said later. He had only one line - "Beads for sale" - that he delivered looking directly at the audience. At that moment, he fell in love with performing.
During the Depression, his father's magazines failed and he was forced to sell insurance, a job he "loathed," and to move his wife and children into a home belonging to her family. Young Bill attended Vaughan Road Collegiate and then North Toronto Collegiate, performing occasionally in school productions, including a role as a policeman in The Pirates of Penzance. A gangly loner, he was socially awkward as a teenager; that's when he realized he was bisexual. Homosexuality was morally taboo and illegal in the 1930s, and that increased his sense of isolation from his family and his peers.
He did very poorly in high school and left without graduating in 1941 to enlist in the army and the 7th Light Field Ambulance Unit. He was 21 and, unlike many young men who dash off to war deluded by visions of glory, he "had no intention of shooting anybody," as he explained in an interview in his Stratford living room last Friday afternoon.
After going overseas, he saw a production of Arsenic and Old Lace in London with Sybil Thorndike and Lillian Braithwaite that enthralled him, but it was his experience as a medic that imbued him with a spiritual appreciation of humanity that he would draw on later as an actor. "You see a lot of death and dying and the one thing you realize is that the cheapest commodity on the market is one human life." He won the Military Medal for bravery and was promoted from corporal to sergeant after he volunteered to set up a first aid centre under heavy mortar fire just north of Cassino in Italy. He never liked talking about his heroism, explaining that "you just do what needs to be done, you don't think about it."
When he returned to Toronto in 1946, he marched into Exhibition Stadium and was told that his parents were sitting in the section of the stands marked H. When he saw his mother for the first time in five years, she looked at him blankly across a morbid divide of devastating experience, and said nothing, not even his name. "It haunted me for a while," he admitted on Friday.
He realized he "had to get on with my life," so he enrolled at the University of Toronto's Trinity College, which gave him a high-school equivalency based on his war service. He performed at the Hart House theatre, and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1949.
By then, he had already gained experience in summer repertory and a season with Canadian Repertory Theatre in Ottawa. He also directed Little Theatre groups throughout Ontario and adjudicated for the Western Ontario Drama League from 1948 to 1952. When he heard that Tom PATTERSON was launching the Stratford Festival in 1953, he said he had to look up the place on a map. Although he thought Mr. PATTERSON was "out of his cotton-picking mind," he signed on and spent most of the next decade serving an apprenticeship in supporting roles such as Sir Robert Brackenbury and Captain Blunt in Richard III and Minister of State in All's Well That Ends Well in the festival's inaugural season, and Froth in Measure for Measure, Hortensio in The Taming of the Shrew and Leader of the Chorus in Oedipus Rex the following year, when he became the first recipient of the Tyrone Guthrie Award.
He was not an overnight sensation, waiting until after he was 40 to land his first major role at Stratford - Prospero in The Tempest - in the festival's 10th season in 1962. The following year, he dazzled critics and audiences with his sexually ambivalent portrayal of Pandarus in Troilus and Cressida.
Although the stage was his mainstay, Mr. HUTT also appeared in film and on television, notably as a port-soaked Sir John A. Macdonald in the 1974 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television production of Pierre Berton's The National Dream, a performance that earned him both a Genie and an Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists award. He also played the father in Robin Phillips's The Wars, based on the novel written by his friend, Timothy Findley. Mr. HUTT generally disliked the disjointed "bits and pieces" approach of filmmaking, complaining that it was antithetical to the process of developing a character and fleshing it out with other actors in the immediacy of a continuous theatrical performance. Nevertheless, he recently starred in six episodes of the television series Slings and Arrows, playing an aging actor performing Lear.
People were surprised when he was cast in the female role of Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest in 1975, but he made the character his own. He said he learned "stillness" from a comment by director Robin Phillips: "Lady Bracknell moves through a room without disturbing one speck of dust." Her towering feathered hat perched atop his 6-foot-2 frame made it awkward for him to move, and he resolved "never to move on stage, unless it improved on stillness." What he wanted to share with the audience was the fact that "thought conveys itself" through the stillness that precedes movement.
In 1979, he played the fool to Peter Ustinov's Lear, making way for the British actor's celebrity turn on the Stratford stage in a role that Mr. HUTT had already played twice. But it was Mr. HUTT's tragic death-haunted fool that drew the raves; according to backstage lore, Mr. Ustinov was "shaken" by his supporting actor's greatness, never thinking that "such an actor was here on this continent."
He had a dry spell at Stratford under John Hirsch, who was artistic director from 1981 to 1985, and only cast him in one role. He fared better under John Neville, but truly enjoyed a renaissance when Richard MONETTE became artistic director in 1994. By then, Mr. HUTT had become heavily involved in the Grand Theatre in nearby London, where Martha Henry was artistic director from 1988 to 1994, and had appeared at the rival Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake in Man and Superman in 1989.
When Mr. HUTT received a Governor-General's Award for lifetime achievement in the performing arts in 1992, he couldn't accept in person because he was performing in A.R. Gurney's The Dining Room at the Grand. The following season, he had three major roles at Stratford: Falstaff in Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, diplomat Harry Raymond in Timothy Findley's The Stillborn Lover (a play that Mr. Findley had written for Mr. HUTT and actress Martha Henry; Stratford reprised it in 1995 as a 75th birthday present for him), and James Tyrone in Eugene O'Neill's A Long Day's Journey Into Night.
About this time, people began asking when he would retire from the stage. He blamed himself for starting the rumour after he performed in The Tempest at Stratford in 1999 and said he wanted to take a year off. That same year, Canada Post issued a stamp celebrating the Stratford Festival with an image of its famous thrust stage superimposed with an ethereal depiction of Mr. HUTT as Prospero with his arms outstretched and a wistful expression on his face. The following year, the City of Stratford renamed the Waterloo Street bridge in his honour.
Instead of taking a final bow at Stratford, he added a new venue to his repertoire by agreeing to play the poet Spooner in Soulpepper's remounting of Harold Pinter's No Man Land in 2003, the first time he had been on a Toronto stage in nearly two decades. " HUTT's Spooner is a miracle of economy, delivering every ounce of the text with an efficiency that makes his performance almost terse in the play's first act," said Kate TAILOR/TAYLOR, then theatre critic for The Globe and Mail, before he "masterfully delivers Spooner's final proposal with an expansiveness that leaves one speculating about the desperation beneath and so closes the play."
The man who lured Mr. HUTT to Toronto was Soulpepper impresario Albert SCHULTZ. A member of the Young Company when Robin Phillips was artistic director at Stratford, Mr. SCHULTZ had played Edgar to Mr. HUTT's desolate monarch in the festival's 1989 production of King Lear. Mr. HUTT returned to Toronto and to Soulpepper in 2004 to play Vladimir in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. During rehearsals, he told The Globe's Ian Brown that "most of my dark moments now centre around just how many more years I am going to be granted. When I turned 80, the heart specialist - because I have a bit of a heart problem - said, 'Well, after 80, it's a bit of a crapshoot, you know.' " By then, he had a bad back from an injury he incurred in the 1950s when, as a minor player in The Merry Wives of Windsor, he jumped into a laundry hamper and jolted his spine.
Although Mr. HUTT had officially retired from Stratford at the end of 2005 with his poignant and masterful performance as Prospero in The Tempest, leaving the audience with the final words, "Let your indulgence set me free," he agreed to come back for one role this year as a farewell gesture to artistic director Richard MONETTE, in Diana LeBlanc's production of Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance. In March, he underwent a series of tests and was diagnosed with anemia, which turned into acute leukemia. He withdrew from the play, offering "my most profound apologies for the problems and inconvenience I'm sure it will cause."
And then he prepared for what he said on Friday was his final project - death - of which he was determined to be the "project manager." With landscape gardener Matthew MacKAY, the man who shared his home since 1973, he chose a cemetery plot and decided on his epitaph: Soldier and Actor. After a stay in hospital, he returned to his home on the banks of the Avon in Stratford and visited with family and Friends, including Albert SCHULTZ. "Bill was extremely brave and generous in preparing those near to him for his final exit. And yet today it seems unthinkable that he is no longer among us," he said in a statement.
On Tuesday, Mr. HUTT decided it was time to go back to hospital. That same afternoon, Michael Therriault, who once played Ariel to Mr. HUTT's Prospero and is currently getting raves as Gollum in the English production of The Lord of the Rings, cancelled a performance to fly home to see him. Sadly, he arrived a few hours too late.
The three stages of William HUTT
His voice was commanding and polite when I requested an interview two weeks ago. "I will be happy to talk with you, but my days are short," he said. "I am looking on my demise as a project, and I am the project manager." We set a date for last Friday afternoon.
On a clear, sunny day I walked across the bridge named in his honour to his house on Waterloo Street in Stratford, where the white Cadillac, with WMHUTT on the licence plate, was parked in the driveway. I rang the doorbell and was ushered into the living room by his housemate, Matthew MacKAY. Wearing a loose, brown-patterned shirt over casual trousers and, with terribly swollen ankles showing above a pair of moccasins, Mr. HUTT sat in a wing chair beside a window. He was attached to a portable oxygen tank and did not rise to greet me -- yet another indication, from an unfailingly courteous man, that his strength was failing. His face had a waxy pallor and, as a reformed smoker after more than 60 years of cigarettes, he was often racked with coughing spells, but his conversation was thoughtful and engaging. Over the next 90 minutes, he talked frankly about his parents, the war and his introduction to death before he had had a chance to know much about life. He said there are three major changes: The first is adolescence, when things happen to your body and your mind. The second stage is when you are in your 20s and your parents become your Friends rather than authority figures (the war had interrupted that process for him and left him divided from his parents). The third stage, the one he was entering, is death and wondering what that will be like.
Mr. HUTT was well aware of his own capacities as an actor. "I will leave the word 'great' to history," he said, "but I do know that in some kind of way, my career as an actor has paralleled the growth of theatre in this country." He said he had always been very practical as an actor, and that his decision to stay home rather than to chase fame in London and New York came from an "arrogant pride" in Canada. "I had no intention of leaving this country until I was invited. I wasn't going to beg." And by doing so, he showed that it was possible to have both a stellar career here and illustrious offers to work elsewhere. Of artistic director Richard MONETTE, who built so much of the last 15 years at the festival around him, Mr. HUTT said: "He has prolonged my life and my career."
The only question he deflected was about his romantic life. He referred to his housemate Mr. MacKAY as "the backbone of my life," but insisted on keeping the nature of their relationship private. "He has his own life, he always has had. I know people would like to pigeonhole it, but it isn't a pigeonhole thing."
Sensing his fatigue, I said my goodbyes. After struggling to get up, he pulled my face down and kissed me on both cheeks, a farewell that only now I realize was permanent. Sandra MARTIN
William deWitt HUTT was born in Toronto on May 2, 1920. He died in hospital in Stratford, Ontario, on June 27, 2007, of acute leukemia. He was 87. A funeral is being planned for Saint_James Anglican Church in Stratford.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-11 published
SCHULTZ, Margaret " Marg" Agnes (née McLEAN)
(August 16, 1913-August 4, 2007)
On Saturday, August 4, 2007, my mother, Marg, died with her family by her side at The Convalescent Home of Winnipeg at the age of 93 years after putting her last piece of chocolate to rest.
Remaining to forever cherish Marg's memory are her daughter Peggy of Toronto; sister Leila (Lee) McDONALD of Winnipeg; niece Barbara KEHLER (Joseph) of Cartier, Manitoba; as well as many relatives, Friends and extended family across Canada who brought joy to Marg's life. She was predeceased by her parents Douglas and Leila McLEAN; husband Carl William SCHULTZ (F/O, DFC, Royal Canadian Air Force No. 77 Squadron) in 1956; brothers Robert Douglas McLEAN of Winnipeg (1973), John (Jack) Gordon of Ottawa (2004).
Born, raised and educated in Winnipeg, Marg graduated from Kelvin High School in 1929 and began her career at the Hudson Bay Co. She became buyer of women's millinery and later lingerie taking her to the Calgary store during the Second World War. Marg and Carl were married in Calgary as the war ended and returned to Winnipeg.
Daughter Peggy was born in 1949 and the family (with Carl's mother, Sophia) moved to Morden, Manitoba. For 5 years Marg worked with the finance department of Bruins Ford dealership. Active in the community, including Ladies Auxiliary, Canadian Branch No. 11 Legion, she made many lifetime Friendships.
1954 saw the family back in Winnipeg, as Marg joined Winnipeg Motor Products (later to become Park Pontiac Buick). Two years later, the world as Marg and her daughter knew it, changed with the sudden death of Carl. As a single mother, she became credit manager of Winnipeg Motors and began active involvement in the wider credit world.
In 1975 Marg became the first female president, in its 40 year history, of Credit Grantors Association of Canada. She was an Associate of the Canadian Credit Institute and held all offices, including president of Credit Women's International.
A credit manager with a heart for those whose circumstances made it hard to manage Marg's humour and smiling face influenced people from all walks of life. "Maggie" could make a story out of any life event!
"Retiring" in 1978, Marg soon took on part time employment with the Credit Bureau until well into her 70's. She was active in Winnipeg Council of Women, Manitoba Society of Seniors, Saint_John's Resource Centre, Sons of Scotland (Lord Selkirk 205). She continued to participate in credit conferences across Canada.
This last decade has seen Marg struggle to retain her sense of control as dementia and diminished eyesight challenged her daily life. She kept going long after it seemed she could not. Her own strength and spirit have been supported by care and devotion of staff and volunteers during Marg's last 8 years at The Convalescent Home of Winnipeg. Thank you to them and to the companions who have added to Marg's quality of life.
In compliance with Marg's wishes, no formal funeral service will be held. A service of remembrance will be held at a later date. Marg will be buried with Carl in Brookside Cemetery.
Those wishing to honour Marg's memory may do so by making a donation to The Convalescent Home of Winnipeg, 276 Hugo Street N., Winnipeg, Manitoba R3M 2N6.

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SCHULTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-17 published
POLLAK, Fred A., CD
Maj. (Ret'd) Royal Canadian Dragoons
Peacefully at the Elizabeth Bruyere Palliative Care Centre in Ottawa on October 16th, 2007 in his 89th year. Beloved husband of Ann (GUTHRIE.) Wonderful dad of Susan, Catherine (Eric SLONE,) Nancy, Robin (Tim VERSTER) and his late daughter, Elizabeth. Loving grandfather of David, Christopher and Matthew SCHULTZ, Ted and Laura SLONE, and Desiree POLLAK- GARCIA. Delighted great-grandfather of Isabelle FULFORD and Anne-Elise SCHULTZ. Fred will also be greatly missed by his brother, John POLLAK (Zdena) and sister Gerta McLEAN; cousins Hannah SPENCER (Elvins), Mimi ROSENBLUTH (Gideon,) Eva LIPA (the late Michael,) and Margit SMITH (Lloyd) nieces Patsy, Andra and Carla, and nephew Jan; other family members, and many good Friends. Fred was born to Anna and Otto POLLAK in Brezno, Czechoslovakia, on May 20, 1919. His family came to Canada as refugees in 1939. Fred enlisted in the Canadian army, served four years overseas and then settled into a long and colourful career in military intelligence. Fred was a charming, disarming and mischievous man, passionate about history, his family and Friends, and the great outdoors. He and Ann were a splendidly matched duo of world travellers and bon vivants. Fred made us laugh, and the many pleasures of his company will not soon be forgotten. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, October 19, 2007 at 11: 30 a.m. with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Fred's memory to the Friends of the Canadian War Museum or a charity of your choice. The family wishes to thank the care providers at Elizabeth Bruyere and the Ottawa General for their kindness and skill. Condolences/donations at www.mcgarryfamily.ca

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SCHUMACHER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-11-06 published
All-terrain vehicle deaths have doubled across region
Police say the increase in this type of fatality is totally preventable.
By Joe BELANGER, Sun Media, Tues., November 6, 2007
Alcohol, helmets and speed are key factors in six deaths this year of people riding all-terrain vehicles in Southwestern Ontario.
And a disturbing trend that has seen double the number of all-terrain vehicle fatalities across the province continued last weekend when a 28-year-old Howick man was killed after losing control of the vehicle.
"They're not handling the vehicles properly," said Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Dave Rector, media officer for the Southwest Region.
"It's a powerful machine. They're not wearing helmets, they're mixing alcohol and that's just a recipe for disaster."
At about midnight Sunday, police said, an all-terrain vehicle driven by James SCHUMACHER, 28, of Howick, went out of control on Gorrie Line in Howick Township.
SCHUMACHER was pronounced dead at the scene and a passenger suffered minor injuries. The cause of the crash is still being investigated.
It was the second all-terrain vehicle-related death in less than a week.
Jerome Leonard AQUASH, 24, of Walpole Island was killed and three others injured early last Thursday when an all-terrain vehicle crashed into a telephone pole and a tree on Chiefs Road near Dan Shab Road. Among those injured was a 15-year-old girl who was airlifted to London Health Sciences Centre in serious condition.
To the end of October, 23 people died in 22 all-terrain vehicle accidents in Ontario, up 91.7 per cent over 2006 when 12 people died in 12 all-terrain vehicle incidents over the same period.
There has been a 350 per cent increase in the number of people killed in Ontario while not wearing a helmet -- nine this year versus two last year.
Meanwhile, alcohol has been a factor in 13 deaths in 2007, up 225 per cent from four last year.
"In reviewing reports of all-terrain vehicle fatal incidents, in a majority of cases the driver was going too fast, lost control and either hit something or the driver was thrown off the vehicle and it landed on him," said Chief Superintendent Bill GRODZINSKI, commander of the Ontario Provincial Police Highway Safety Division.
"All-terrain vehicles can be very dangerous if not driven responsibly," he said. "Drinking and driving or not wearing a helmet increases an operator's chance of having a serious crash considerably."
In one incident, an all-terrain vehicle driver was going too fast on a private road and lost control on a curve. The driver was ejected from the vehicle and was hit by a pickup truck.
In another, an inexperienced driver tried to jump a ditch but hit the edge of it instead and launched the vehicle 29 metres before it landed on the driver, who had been drinking.
"The increase in this type of fatality is totally preventable," GRODZINSKI said. "The Ontario Provincial Police will continue to maintain a zero tolerance approach to charging all-terrain vehicle operators who are caught drinking and driving or not wearing approved helmets."
Aside from fatalities, all-terrain vehicle injuries are also causing concern. A recent Canadian Institute for Health Information study concluded the number of hospitalizations related to all-terrain vehicle accidents increased 25 per cent from 1996-1997 to 2004-2005.
That means, on average, 19 people a day went to emergency departments in Ontario, a toll that has climbed dramatically in less than a decade.

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SCHUMANN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-11 published
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Eileen Sylvia (née FRENCH)
Passed away peacefully at Lanark Heights in Kitchener on August 10th 2007 in her 81st year. She was a long time resident of Burlington and summer resident at Miller Lake on the Bruce Peninsula. Cherished wife of Lloyd for 63 years. Loving mother of Donna DORAN (Wayne) of Kitchener, Thomas LOW/LOWE/LOUGH of Etobicoke and Steven LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (Beth) of Owen Sound. Grandmother of Heather SCHUMANN (Robert,) Lisa DORAN-STERMANN (Chris), Beth BROWN (Tyler), Amy DORAN- STREIT (Jeff,) Stephanie LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Melissa LOW/LOWE/LOUGH and Kristopher LOW/LOWE/LOUGH. Great-Grandmother of Jacob, Katrina, Emily, Katelyn, Tayah and Grady. Dear sister of Donald FRENCH of Toronto and William FRENCH (Esther) of Burlington. Predeceased by her sister-in-law Jean FRENCH. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line (one stoplight north of the Queen Elizabeth Way), Burlington (905-632-3333) on Sunday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. A Service of Remembrance will be held at Burlington Baptist Church, 2225 New Street, Burlington on Monday, August 13, 2007 at 1 p.m. Private Family Interment, Burlington Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, the Alzheimer's Society of Ontario or Burlington Baptist Church would be appreciated by the family. Special thanks to the doctors and staff at Grand River Hospital, Lanark Place and Lanark Heights. www.smithsfh.com

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SCHUMMER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-03 published
MASSEL, Ruth (SCHUMMER)
On the Feast of Mary, Mother of God, January 1st, 2007, surrounded by her family at Columbia Forest Long Term Care Center, Waterloo. The former Ruth SCHUMMER, aged 90 years. Ruth was a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Church and a Past President of St. Teresa C.W.L. Beloved mother to Dianne and her husband Paul of Waterloo, Tom and his wife Sally and Mary KEAYS all of London and Father Paul MASSEL of Peterborough, dear sister to Anne LYNCH of Toronto, cherished Nana to Jennifer and her husband Chad BEAUPRE, Martin MASSEL and Jeffrey and Michael KEAYS and Nana-Nana to Jack and Paige BEAUPRE, sister-in-law to Judy MASSEL of Ottawa and Larry McCALLUM of Kitchener. Predeceased by her husband Norman in 1980 and one son Peter in infancy, 4 brothers Oscar, George, Frank and Harry SCHUMMER and 6 sisters Beatrice, Gertrude, Mary, Louise, Helen and Betty. Friends may call at the Ratz-Bechtel Funeral Home, 621 King St. W., Kitchener on Thursday from 2-5 and 7-9, where parish prayers will be recited at 8: 45. A funeral mass will be held on Friday at 11: 00 A.M., from Our Lady of Lourdes Church with Father Paul MASSEL officiating and donations may be made to Canadian Hearing Society through the funeral home 1-519-745-9495 or at www.ratzbechtelfuneralhome.com A special thank-you to the health care professionals at Waterloo Heights, Beechwood Manor and Johnson House at Columbia Forest. You can shed tears that she is gone, or you can smile because she has lived. Your heart can be empty because you can't see her, or you can be full of love you shared. You can turn your back on tomorrow and live yesterday, or you can be happy for tomorrow because of yesterday. You can remember her and only that she's gone, or you can cherish her memory and let it live on. You can cry and close your mind, be empty and turn your back, or you can do what she'd want: smile, open your eyes, love and go on. With love.

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SCHURMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-19 published
HARWOOD, Gordon Walter, OLS, CLS
Of Wiarton, peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services Wiarton on Saturday, November 17th, 2007. Gordon Walter HARWOOD in his 72nd year. Beloved husband and best friend of the former Betty WILSON for 42 years. Cherished father of Barbara WEST- BARTLEY and her husband Bill BARTLEY, of Wiarton; Linda and her partner Barry WISMER, of Port Elgin; and Douglas GOULD, of Calgary. Treasured grandfather of Graham GOULD; Rhonda (Mike SSAINTURENT;) Melissa BARTLEY (and friend Simon CULYER); Kevin WEST; Drew WEST; Isaac WISMER; Anne WISMER, and Ian WISMER. Brother of Roy HARWOOD, of Sauble Beach; and brother-in-law of Roy WILSON (Harriett,) and Nancy SCHURMAN (late Ron.) Sadly missed by his many nieces, nephews and Friends. Predeceased by his parents, Harry and Lil brothers Jim and Ken; a sister Jean; and sisters-in-law Lois, Elaine and Elsie; and a brother-in-law Russ. Gord will be remembered as a man of devotion and dedication. His love of family and his community is known near and far; belonging to the Grey-Bruce Motorcycle Club, Wiarton Legion, and the Wiarton and District Lions Club (35 years). Gord had just recently become a Melvin Jones Fellow, the highest honour that Lions International can bestow. Family will receive Friends at the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel, Sauble Beach (519) 422-0041 on Tuesday, November 20th, 2007 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Celebration of Gord's Life will be conducted from the chapel on Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock. Rev. Robert HARWOOD officiating. A Lions Memorial Service will be conducted. Interment in Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Wiarton and District Lions Club or Christ Anglican Church Tara would be appreciated. In living memory of Gord an Oak tree will be planted in the funeral home meadow by the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel. Condolences may be expressed on-line at www.whitcroftfuneralhome.com.

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SCHURTER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
BECKBERGER, Agnes Mary
Of Cambridge, passed away at Wingham and District Hospital, Wingham on Saturday, January 6, 2007 in her 93rd year. Agnes will be missed by her many nieces and nephews as well as great-nieces and great-nephews. Pre-deceased by her brother George; sisters Babe LIZZOTTE and Annie LANG; nephews Joseph in infancy and Don great-nephew Paul Jr.; nephews-in-law Dave BERBERICH and Albert MERCHANT and parents George and Abby (SCHURTER) BECHBERGER. Visitation at Mary Immaculate Church, Chepstow on Tuesday, January 9, 2007 from 11: 00 until time of the funeral mass at 1:00 p.m. Interment in Mary Immaculate Cemetery, Chepstow. Memorial donations to the Cambridge Community Care Access Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton (519) 881-1273

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