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"MYE" 2007 Obituary


MYERS  MYERSON 

MYERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-30 published
EVERSOLE, Margaret Sophia (formerly PLEWES, née HARDY)
Born January 20, 1913 to Eunice Olivetta MUNRO and Charles Ernest HARDY, Margaret died peacefully on April 20, 2007 at the Village of Tansley Woods, Burlington, with her family close by. Affectionately known as "Dee", she is survived by her daughters-in-law Cathy PLEWES of Oakville, Ontario, and Donna PLEWES of Edmond, Oklahoma step-daughters Marilyn HOLMSTROM, Nancy WARD, and Joanne MYERS grandchildren John, Kimberley, Amanda and Derek; nephews John PLEWES of Naples, Florida, and Don PLEWES of Toronto, Ontario niece Pam SCHMIDT of Napanee, Ontario. She was predeceased by her husbands Doctor Campbell PLEWES and Doctor James EVERSOLE; her sons James PLEWES and Doctor John PLEWES, and her daughter Mary PLEWES; her sister Doris HARDY and her brother James HAWKINS. Her courage in the face of so many losses and declining health, her sense of humour and love for her family will be treasured by all who knew her. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 9, 2007 at 11 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street, Oakville. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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MYERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-05 published
EVERSOLE, Margaret Sophia (formerly PLEWES, née HARDY)
Born January 20, 1913 to Eunice Olivetta MUNRO and Charles Ernest HARDY, Margaret died peacefully on April 20, 2007 at the Village of Tansley Woods, Burlington, with her family close by. Affectionately known as "Dee", she is survived by her daughters-in-law Cathy PLEWES of Oakville, Ontario, and Donna PLEWES of Edmond, Oklahoma step-daughters Marilyn HOLMSTROM, Nancy WARD, and Joanne MYERS grandchildren John, Kimberley, Amanda and Derek; nephews John PLEWES of Naples, Florida, and Don PLEWES of Toronto, Ontario niece Pam SCHMIDT of Napanee, Ontario. She was predeceased by her husbands Doctor Campbell PLEWES and Doctor James EVERSOLE; her sons James PLEWES and Doctor John PLEWES, and her daughter Mary PLEWES; her sister Doris HARDY and her brother James HAWKINS. Her courage in the face of so many losses and declining health, her sense of humour and love for her family will be treasured by all who knew her. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 9, 2007 at 11 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street, Oakville. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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MYERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-13 published
'He couldn't wait to come home'
Killed in roadside bombing, soldier was a funny, down-to-earth guy, friend says
By Matt HARTLEY, Page A16
It was after dinner on Logan CASWELL's 12th birthday when Canadian military officials showed up at the door to deliver the grimmest news possible: Logan's big brother, Trooper Darryl CASWELL, was dead, the latest Canadian soldier to be killed in a roadside bombing in Afghanistan.
Logan's was not the only birthday that would forever after carry a dark taint: Trooper CASWELL was set to come back on July 31st, the day he would have turned 26.
"I still can't believe that he's gone," his stepmother Christine CASWELL told The Globe and Mail from the family's Clarington home, about an hour east of Toronto. "I'm just still in denial. He couldn't wait to come home."
Ms. CASWELL said her stepson was looking forward to being an "average Joe" again. Her husband Paul, Trooper CASWELL's father, had spoken with him by phone Saturday, and what would turn out to be the last e-mail from their son arrived from Afghanistan on Sunday.
Trooper CASWELL was killed while travelling with a convoy carrying supplies to a forward operating base in Khakriz, a northwestern district of Kandahar province, about 40 kilometres north of Kandahar City, when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle at 6: 25 a.m. local time. Two other soldiers were injured in the blast and transported via helicopter to Kandahar airfield for medical treatment. Both are expected to recover and return to active duty soon. He was the third member of the Royal Canadian Dragoons, based out of Canadian Forces Base Petawawa near Ottawa, to be killed by Taliban attacks in the past three months. Trooper CASWELL was deployed as part of the Reconnaissance Squadron from the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment battle group.
Those who served with Trooper CASWELL remembered him as a tough soldier and tireless worker who was never afraid to speak his mind. Trooper Keith Rombough, was a member of that same group. Together they trained at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, braved patrols in Afghanistan and slept through dusty nights in the same tent, talking of their families back in Canada.
He said Trooper CASWELL and the soldiers he rode with dubbed their vehicle Ghost Rider after the Marvel comic book character. Monday's explosion wasn't the first time Trooper CASWELL's patrol had been the target of a Taliban strike. A few months ago, during a similar patrol, a rocket attack blew the front wheels off his vehicle, Trooper Rombough said.
"He'd always joke around about it," he said. "He took a small amount of pride in that."
Trooper CASWELL was born in Bowmanville, Ontario, and his parents divorced when he was 2. Growing up, he spent time living with his mother in the Toronto satellite communities of Clarington and Whitby as well as Sarnia, Ontario, before moving in with his father and stepmother in Clarington when he was 12. When his father remarried, young Darryl CASWELL was best man.
"One thing I'll never forget was that when Paul proposed to me, Darryl got down on his hands and knees and proposed to me, too," Ms. CASWELL said. "He was such a character. He was a good kid, with a good heart." A funny, down-to-earth guy, that's how Matt ADAM/ADAMS, Trooper CASWELL's best friend of 12 years will always remember him. Being a soldier and serving his country was the fulfilment of a lifelong dream for Trooper CASWELL, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS said. It was all he talked about as a kid, and his face lit up when he spoke of his experiences with the military. A fierce patriot, Trooper CASWELL once jokingly chastised Mr. ADAM/ADAMS's father for flying a frayed Canadian flag in the family's backyard.
"It was pretty hilarious how he shamed him into getting a new one," Mr. ADAM/ADAMS said.
Just a few weeks ago, Trooper CASWELL and his crew took a few weeks of leave and travelled to Australia, where he met up with Kayla MYERS, an old friend from high school, now studying education there. It turns out she would be one of the last of his Friends to see him alive.
"He was very proud to serve his country. He was just such a great guy," she said.
Prime Minister Stephen Harper extended his sympathy to the CASWELL family and praised the ongoing efforts of Canadian soldiers in a written statement released yesterday.

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MYERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-03 published
DUBIN, Anne Ruth, Q.C.
Following surgery, Anne lost her fight for life on August 2, 2007. Anne was a devoted and loving wife to Charles, her husband and best friend of 55 years. Survived by her brothers and sisters-in-law Myer and Sybil LEVINE and Leonard and Bobbie LEVINE. Predeceased by her sister Molly MYERS. Will be sadly missed by nieces and nephew Francie and Stuart KLEIN and Marcia ROBINSON and grandniece and grandnephew Sherri and Justin.
Anne retired following a long and successful career in corporate law. She was a director of Petro-Canada and a member of the Ontario Law Reform Commission Advisory Board. She was also a director of Telemedia Communications Inc., Morgan Trust Co. of Canada and a former Public Governor of the Toronto Stock Exchange. She was vice-chair Area Committee of the York County Legal Aid Plan, a former member of the Attorney General's Advisory Committee on the Juvenile and Family Court of Metropolitan Toronto, and a former member of the Joint Committee on Penal Reform for Women.
Anne had a long history of community service. She was a vice-chair of York University, a trustee of the Toronto Hospital Foundation, a director of the Canadian Club, Toronto, an Honorary Counsel of the Canadian Red Cross Society, an Honorary Counsel of the Museum Children's Theatre, a director of the Elizabeth Fry Society, a director of the Toronto Mental Health Clinic for Children and Adolescents and its successor, the Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, a director of the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, and a trustee of the Ontario Mental Health Foundation.
Anne will always be remembered for her intelligence, independence, indomitable spirit, and her dedication and loyalty to family and Friends.
Funeral service will be held at Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street, Toronto at 11: 00 a.m. on Friday, August 3, 2007. Interment Holy Blossom Cemetery, Brimly Rd. Following interment all are invited to 619 Avenue Rd., Toronto. Memorial donations may be made in memory of Anne Dubin to the Toronto General and Western Hospital Foundation, 416-603-5958. Special thanks to Doctor Phillip ELLISON and nurse Debbie KLATT.

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MYERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
Fighter pilot became college president and put education in his sights
Royal Canadian Air Force flyer returned from the Second World War determined to get a university degree. He found success in business and passed on his lust for knowledge to a generation of students
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Mel GARLAND was a man who did well at everything he did, and he did an awful lot. A fighter pilot, a businessman and a civil servant, he was also a visionary who helped develop community colleges and trade schools in Ontario.
Mr. GARLAND was the second president of Durham College, a community college at Oshawa, east of Toronto, from 1980 to 1988.
It was a time when the community college system was vigorously expanding. Set up by the Ontario government in 1967, Durham was one of about 20 new tertiary-level schools. The object was to provide students with a practical education that would lead to good jobs, and to improve the province's standard of living. That is why Mr. GARLAND promoted two- and three-year applied engineering programs, and worked to get Durham College - the school closest to a large auto plant - to set up a robotics lab.
"He was a strong believer that a modern society needed knowledge workers above all else, and in particular, leaders in technology," said Gary POLONSKY who succeeded him as president of Durham College. "Mel expanded programs in engineering technology and trades."
As part of running Durham College, he worked at establishing the Skilled Trades Centre in nearby Ajax, Ontario A part of Durham College, it now has about 2,000 students learning to become everything from electricians and plumbers to millwrights and metal fabricators.
Mel GARLAND grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario, where the family lived in the same house for 60 years. Both his parents were immigrants from Glasgow, and his father worked as a maintenance foreman at Thompson Products. As a boy, young Mel and his best friend, Pete BELFORD, liked to sneak onto the local tennis courts to play. The president of told them they could play for free if they performed odd jobs around the club. Eventually, the two of them played at the St. Catharines Tennis Club, where one year they won the doubles championship. Later, they went on to win the Niagara District championship.
Mr. GARLAND and Mr. BELFORD did a lot of things together, and remained Friends for life. As youngsters, they joined the Boy Scouts, and once shared first place in a competition. Mr. GARLAND eventually became a King's Scout, the top honour a Scout can earn. They once hitchhiked to Montreal and, when they were old enough, went to Hamilton together to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force and serve in the Second World War.
In 1942, Mr. GARLAND was selected for pilot training. At flight school, the same things that had made him a good tennis player - sharp eyesight and quick reflexes - singled him out as a fighter pilot. Just before he went overseas, he went to a tennis club dance and met a young woman named Marguerite ALLEN. They saw each other every night before he left.
He arrived in England in February of 1944, at the age of 21. At that stage in the war, fighter pilots had two main jobs: protecting bombers on their way to Germany, and preparing for the Allied invasion of France. Almost as soon as he arrived, 403 Squadron moved to Tangmere, a Royal Air Force station in West Sussex, to be closer to the English Channel.
By this point, Mr. GARLAND was a flying officer. He and the rest of the squadron were equipped with the latest version of the Spitfire fighter. Armed with cannons and machine guns, this version was a much more deadly weapon than the one that flew in the Battle of Britain. Flying low-level missions over France was also deadly for the pilots.
The squadron moved to an airfield at Dieppe, France, on June 16, just 10 days after the D-Day invasion of Normandy. Almost exactly a month later, Mr. GARLAND's plane was hit by flak while on a mission. At first he thought he could land the plane, but a fire broke out and he was forced to bail out. For a few seconds, he was trapped up in the cockpit and feared his parachute would not open but managed to alight in a field, convinced he was safe. To his surprise, he was soon surrounded by German soldiers.
He spent three weeks as a prisoner of war, though never in a camp. The Germans were in retreat and marched Mr. GARLAND and the other prisoners across France, sometimes covering as much as 40 kilometres a day. In the confusion of the retreat, Mr. GARLAND escaped. He slept in the barns of sympathetic French farmers and slowly made his way back to the Allied lines.
He soon found himself home in Canada, since the Royal Canadian Air Force never sent an escaped PoW back into service, fearing they would be shot if recaptured. But the war in Europe was soon over, and Mr. GARLAND resolved to make use of veterans scholarships and get an education. Before the war, he had finished high school but lacked the money to go to university. The scholarships allowed him to go to Queen's University in Kingston and he graduated in the class of 1948½ (to speed up their schooling and catch up with life, veterans were allowed fall graduation).
While at Queen's, he married Marguerite (with Mr. BELFORD as best man) and the couple set off for Boston. He been accepted to the Harvard Business School, even though he had already used up most of his credits under the veterans' scholarship scheme. To make ends meet, Marguerite found work and he got a night job at the Harvard Library.
After Harvard, they returned home. Mr. GARLAND started work at General Electric Canada. He later worked at General Bakeries and Ford Canada, during the period when the auto maker was building its assembly plant in Oakville, Ontario
Even then, he was concerned about Ontario's ability to compete in the world. In 1967, he became chairman of the education committee of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, the same year the community college system was founded.
In 1974, Mr. GARLAND joined the Ontario government as executive director of industry and then executive director of trade. It was the beginning of two decades of devotion to fine-tuning Ontario's industrial infrastructure. He carried on with the same mission at Durham College.
"The lack of skilled people to fill the manpower needs of industry is a real problem," he said in 1980, the year he was appointed president. "It's in the schools that we can turn attitudes around to make these skilled jobs desirable careers."
Under his leadership, the school began expanding its industrial facilities.
"He focused on bringing the latest technology to the classroom and constructing a new state-of-the-art robotics lab, the precursor to our Integrated Manufacturing Centre on campus today," said Leah MYERS, president of Durham College. "Mel was known as an entrepreneurial and consummate professional who set high standards for himself and those around him."
Although he was a man with many careers, his neighbours in the Toronto suburb of Etobicoke remember him as a strong family man who was devoted to his six children. Neighbour and close friend Ron Quick said his biggest success was raising his brood and a marriage that lasted 60 years.
His oldest daughter, Linda, said he had an easy manner with both his own children and others on the block. "Much can be said for my father's many achievements, but he was the kind of dad who says after dinner, 'Let's play some ball,' " she said. "We would troop out to the side of the yard for a pickup game of baseball and, within minutes, kids from up and down the street would be joining us. Dad would be the only adult out there."
The flags at Durham College flew at half-mast the week Mr. GARLAND died. His friend Mr. BELFORD, who never left Port Dalhousie, attended the funeral.
Melvin Lloyd GARLAND was born in Port Dalhousie, Ontario, on October 19, 1922. He died on September 3, 2007, in Ancaster, Ontario, of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 84. He is survived by his wife, Marguerite. He also leaves daughters Linda, Jane, Jennifer and Pat, and sons David and Greig.

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MYERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-10 published
MYERS, Molly
Peacefully in her 96th year, on Saturday, December 8th, 2007 at Baycrest Hospital. Molly MYERS, beloved wife of the late Hymie MYERS. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Martin and Patty MYERS, and Karen and Bob YUKICH. Devoted grandmother of Carla, Aaron, and Rebecca and her husband Seth, and great-grandmother of Peter. Molly was a lifelong peace activist and a champion of social causes for over 70 years. She will be remembered fondly by family and Friends. A graveside service was held at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park on Sunday, December 9th, 2007. There will be a celebration of Molly's life at the United Jewish People's Order Winchevsky Centre, 585 Cranbrook Avenue (at Bathurst Street), on Sunday, January 6, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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MYERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-25 published
BURROWS, Miriam (née MYERSON)
On Sunday, June 24, 2007, in Montreal. Beloved wife of the late Nathan BURROWS. Devoted mother and mother-in-law of Laura CRANGLE of Toronto, Ellis and Barbara of Oakville. Cherished Grandmother of Jillian and Hilary CRANGLE; Jeremy and Adam BURROWS. Predeceased by her siblings Faigie, Annette, Toby, Al and Bernice MYERSON. Sister-in-law of Bertha and the late Myer TAVEROFF, Molly and the late Sidney LEVINE, the late Clara and the late Sidney BURROWS. She is survived by her nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Special thanks to her caregiver Sybil Mayers for her loving care and devotion. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, 3888 Jean Talon St. W., Montreal on Tuesday, June 26 at 11: 00 a.m. Burial in Montreal. Shiva in Toronto. Donations in her memory may be made to the Hope and Cope c/o the Jewish General Hospital Foundation, (514) 340-8251, or to the charity of your choice.

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