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"ODO" 2007 Obituary


ODOHERTY  ODONNELL  ODONOGHUE 

O'DOHERTY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
BURDO, Mattéa O'Doherty
Born August 28, 2007 At 19: 46.
Welcome to the world! Congratulations to the proud new parents Julie and Bruno Felicitations a la famille O'DOHERTY Auguri per la famiglia BURDO! All your new Zios and Zias love you! Jon and Nancy, Phil and Tilly, Michael, Emy and Barbara.

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O'DONNELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-04 published
CALLAGHAN, George Frederick
(June 19, 1929-December 2, 2007)
Fred passed away peacefully on December 2nd at his home in Rexdale, Ontario. Devoted husband of 50 years to Bernice (née O'DONNELL.) Loving father of Frank, Ann, Larry, Maureen, Mary, John, Valerie and Barbara. Fondly remembered by daughter-in-law Christine and sons-in-law Walter, Bruce, Bryan, Peter and Evan. Proud grandfather of Lorelei, Audrey, Claire, Jack, Aedan, Colin, Gordie, Greg, Tom, Lee, Neil and Mary. Fred will be sadly missed by his brothers and sisters: Lillian, John, Frances, Everett, Frank, Mary, Jean and Laura. Predeceased by brothers Jim, Harold and Ken. He will also be missed by his many nieces and nephews. Fred was the first-born child of Alberta (née HOOD) and George CALLAGHAN. He was born in High River, Alberta and the family moved to Prince Edward Island when he was seven years old. Fred moved to Toronto in 1951 and he worked for Canadian National Rail for more than 40 years. His heart was always on the Island and Fred returned as often as possible to visit his many relatives and Friends. The family would like to express deepest gratitude to the doctors and nurses at Etobicoke General Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Multiple Myeloma Research Fund at Princess Margaret Hospital.
Fred will be missed by all who knew and loved him.
Visitation at the Neweduk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2058 Kipling Ave. (North of Rexdale Blvd.) on Tuesday, December 4th from 2-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Benedict's Church, 2194 Kipling Ave. on Wednesday, December 5th at 10 a.m.
Interment Queen of Heaven Cemetery.

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O'DONOGHUE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-20 published
BRUNK, Nyle H.
(World War 2 Veteran)
Peacefully at Lee Manor in Owen Sound on Thursday July 19, 2007. In his 87th year, Nyle H. BRUNK, loving husband of Marion BRUNK (née JONES) and the late Alma (née HIPEL.) Loving father of Sharon and her husband John DANILKO, Beverley O'DONOGHUE, Rodger and his wife Jan, Gwen and her husband Neil LAMONT and Karen MORRISON. Loved grandfather and great-grandfather. Dear brother of Jean (Mrs. Allan BOWRING), Delmer BRUNK and his wife Jean, Della (Mrs. Albert WATTS), Helen (Mrs. John GINGRICH), and Betty (Mrs. Bob BORDER). Brother-in-law of Sandra (Mrs. Ronald BRUNK.) Fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his brother Ronald. Following Nyle's request a celebration of life will be held at a later date. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Leprosy Foundation or to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family and may be made by calling Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home (519) 376-2326.

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O'DONOGHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-02 published
She was the First Anglican woman elected a parish warden in Toronto
Raised in 11 foster homes, she became a teacher and counsellor who championed the rights of aboriginal people, immigrants, gays, the poor and the marginalized long before it was trendy
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Toronto -- You'd think being shunted from one foster home to another would make a person hard. Helen GOUGH -- born illegitimate at a time when that was a stigma -- spent her childhood in no fewer than 11 foster homes, and emerged a gentle but tenacious advocate with an outsized social conscience that was fired by her mentor, Jesus. "Whatever I did, I did it as a Christian," she wrote in the preface to her unpublished memoirs. "I was a Jesus freak. I wanted to lead that kind of life."
In doing so, Ms. GOUGH "turned the Gospels upside down [by] turning those who were down, up," eulogized Rev. Sara BOYLES, priest at Ms. GOUGH's beloved Holy Trinity Church in downtown Toronto. "Helen turned the world upside down."
She did that, against all odds, by excelling in the so-called helping professions: Teaching, counselling and activism for aboriginal people, immigrants, gays, the poor and the marginalized. She stood up for their rights long before it was trendy, often forsaking her own fragile psyche.
Far from being a household name, except perhaps within the Anglican Church's more progressive elements in Toronto, Ms. GOUGH would not have minded being labelled ordinary, though she was far from it. "It's ordinary people, ordinary women, who have done much of what it took to make this nation what it is," she stated not long ago. "Ordinary people with extraordinary courage. Whatever else I am, I'm a Canadian. I'm a Canadian woman."
She was the first woman elected a parish warden in the Anglican Church of Canada's Toronto diocese, in 1971.
Her mother, also named Helen GOUGH, play a pivotal role in her fatherless and husbandless life. The elder Ms. GOUGH, who died in 1981, had been a Barnardo child, one of some 30,000 sick, destitute or orphaned British children shipped to the colonies as "seedling citizens of the British Empire" by English philanthropist Thomas Barnardo to work on farms or as domestics. (Between 600 and 1,000 children were sent to Canada from the late 1800s to 1915.)
Helen senior, with still-fresh memories of time spent in an actual English poorhouse, arrived in Southern Ontario in 1912 as a 10-year-old, together with her younger brother, Arthur. She toiled as a servant at seven different places until she turned 18, surviving on the cheapest foods and not once being allowed to use an indoor toilet.
On her own in Toronto, she found work as a clerk at the Hospital for Sick Children, and soon fell in with a crowd that included a handsome, suave clothing salesman from Stratford. When she became pregnant, he denied all knowledge of her, as advised by his uncle, a judge. It wasn't until the younger Ms. GOUGH was in her late 40s that she discovered her father's identity; he had become a fat drunk and died of a coronary when he was 60.
Too poor to raise her daughter, the elder Ms. GOUGH, by this time a live-in domestic, appealed to Catholic Children's Aid. (The child's father was Catholic.) But if the agency took the child in, she would be raised in an orphanage as a Roman Catholic. Her mother declined. "It must have taken tremendous courage for a woman to do that in 1930, and she was one of many who simply refused," her daughter later wrote.
Instead, her mother turned to the Children's Aid Society, which transferred the sickly baby to a woman whose sole task was to nurse sick infants back to health. Then came long years of foster care at nearly a dozen places, during which mother and daughter saw each other only intermittently. By the age of eight, young Helen had already attended Baptist, United and Roman Catholic churches, but made up her mind that the Anglicans were for her. She finally went to live with her mother when she was 15.
Ms. GOUGH's first taste of overt racism came while she worked as a teenaged waitress one summer at the Pearson Hotel on Centre Island. As she recalled, a short, self-important Englishman working in the kitchen informed a Chinese dishwasher: "I'm not taking any orders from a bloody Chink!" The Chinese man, a foot taller, brought the dish he was holding down on the man's skull. The plate shattered, and the blood coursed down the small man's head. Both were fired, and the incident stayed with her forever.
She was 19 when she befriended Gerry O'DONOGHUE of Toronto (later Gerry RANSOM,) whose family adopted Ms. GOUGH as one of their own, and whose daughter Beverley was Ms. GOUGH's goddaughter.
The same year, Ms. GOUGH graduated from Toronto Teachers' College and went to teach near Port Credit, Ontario That was followed by four years of teaching status Indians and Métis at an "Indian Day School" in Moose Lake, southeast of The Pas, Manitoba
Life was primitive and harsh, but for Ms. GOUGH, it was happily reminiscent of the Girl Guides camps she'd attended as a child. The three teachers took turns doing the three main chores: one week each on cooking, cleanup and "wood and water."
It was here that she became smitten with the shy aboriginal children, and impressed with their determination to learn English. (There is no mention in Ms. GOUGH's memoirs of church-run residential schools, where native children underwent horrific abuses that led to multimillion-dollar legal payouts decades later.) After teaching catechism and assisting with church services, she returned to Toronto to deepen her spirituality by studying at the Anglican Women's Training College. One summer, she took a job with the federal government's Indian Affairs department teaching at an Ojibwa-Cree settlement in Bearskin Lake, Ontario
In 1960, she began as an "Indian liaison worker" in the Toronto diocese, helping aboriginals access "white" social service agencies. It was half-time initially, "since no one really believed there were Indians in Toronto," she would recall. She was a pioneer of the first native centre in Toronto, and proudly outed a co-worker who had referred to Ms. GOUGH's client as "dirty and drunken&hellip you know, a typical Indian."
The man who had made the remark "was not happy about being exposed, but it was a great moment of insight for me," she remembered. "It's important to speak truth to power when we are in positions to do so. If we don't, who will?"
Around this time, Ms. GOUGH noticed that she was prone to periodic bouts of depression, preceded by highs that dropped to debilitating lows, and an inability to control either. The condition led her to years of psychotherapy and such treatments as psychodrama, bioenergetics and Arthur Janov's primal therapy, during which she began to face the pain of separation she'd experienced as a child.
She went into social service work for the diocese, mainly on housing conditions in Toronto, before returning to school at 35 to earn a B.A. at York University. She confessed that it was the worst experience of her adult life. With a D average, "I was so ashamed, I didn't go to my graduation or tell my mother about it until much later." Despite that, she returned to York a decade later to earn a master's degree in English, with honours, and an essay prize.
Meantime, there was a flurry of action in Toronto: In 1968, she was one of the original activists to develop Alexandra Park Co-op, today a 410-unit housing project in downtown Toronto (she worked alongside June Rowlands, who went on to become mayor of Toronto). She then worked for the Young Women's Christian Association, finding rooms for Caribbean domestics, before taking a job for 17 years with the Toronto Board of Education, working extensively with immigrant parents. Her involvement with the Riverdale Intergenerational Project brought seniors into schools as volunteers.
She embraced gay rights through what she called a particularly Anglican resolution: "All may, none must and some ought." Tall, gangly and sometimes physically awkward, she denied being a lesbian, "although I feel more comfortable with women than men. If you grow up in a series of homes, you don't learn to establish primary relationships. There were boys I really liked but I saw myself as plain. I was a wallflower at dances and very bookish. I made good secondary relationships, but primary ones [were] much more difficult."
In retirement, she seemed to accelerate, taking up travel, river rafting, voice lessons and photography. She produced pictures that testified to an almost child-like wonderment about the natural world.
She saw her mission through a simple lens: If she was going to do anything as a Christian, it was to respond to society's dispossessed. "I was not there to hold office," she reasoned, "but to meet people on the ground."
Helen Noreen Honora GOUGH was born in Toronto on November 21, 1930, and died there of cancer on June 1, 2007. She was 76. According to her wishes, only men washed her body prior to burial. She leaves her adoptive family, the Ransoms, and many Friends and admirers.

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ODONOGHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-15 published
HUDSON, Mary Louise (née O'BRIEN)
(April 19, 1915-November 15, 2006)
Peacefully, at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, at the age of 91. Beloved wife and 'Pal' of the late William George HUDSON, devoted mother of Robert (Nicole FLORENT) of Kingston and Roger of California. Loving ' Mama' of Danielle (Ken SULLIVAN,) Lindsay (Jennifer MALLON), Graham and Nadine (Jeffery HUDDLESTON). She was the daughter of Henry Benjamin O'BRIEN and Mary (ODONOGHUE) O'BRIEN, both deceased. Sister of Ernestine (Brooklyn, New York) and Irene (Toronto); also sister to Henry Jr., Frances, Ann, James (Jim), and Frank, who predeceased her. Aunt to many nieces and nephews in Toronto, Kingston, Halifax and New York, particularly Alma (Jinny) and Matti AHOLA and their children to whom she was very close over the years. She was born in Barbados; her parents immigrated to Canada and settled in Toronto when she was an infant. Her father operated a number of businesses, including a shoemaking and leather store at York and Front streets, on the site of the current Royal York Hotel. She started her career as a legal secretary, then became a homemaker and later, general secretary. A feisty, determined woman, she was a resident of Randolph Road (Leaside), since 1943. The memorial service will be held on Saturday, August 18 at 1600 hours at Leaside United Church, 822 Millwood Road, East York. Cremation has taken place, and her ashes will be entered beside Bill's at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Leaside United Church or the Alzheimer Society. The family is grateful to Sgt. Larry STORTZ, Toronto Police, to Noreen DAWE and David McFARLANE, Sunnybrook Psychogeriatric Program and to Det. Dianne McCARTHY, Kingston Police. Expressions of sympathy may be sent to Doctor Robert W. HUDSON, Etherington Hall, Queen's University, 94 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 or hudsonr@queensu.ca.

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O'DONOGHUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-28 published
MacKENZIE, James Carroll
Through his marriage to Rosemary Beatrice LA PRAIRIE (deceased,) a member of the La Prairie clan, son-in-law of "Lap" and Beatrice LA PRAIRIE and brother-in-law to Jacqueline La Praire O'DONOGHUE and Paul, Jules, Richard, Leon, Carl, Clifford and George LA PRAIRIE. Father to Jamie, Rosemary, Karen, Malcolm, Paul, Fraser, Laurie, Jennifer, Moira, Megan, Stuart, Lesley, Blair, father-in-law to their 11 spouses, grandfather to 41 and great-grandmother to a few more, in addition to being uncle to about 120 in the La Prairie clan. Jim was born in Toronto, son of Colin and Catherine MacKENZIE and a brother to Marguerite, Faustina and Leo. He graduated from the University of Toronto and had a professional career in Toronto, McMasterville, P.Q., Boston and Rochester, New York. Visitation will be on Sunday, December 30 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Anthony Funeral Home, Monroe Ave., Rochester and Funeral Service at 11 a.m. December 31st at Saint Thomas More Church, East Ave., Rochester.

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