All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"OVA" 2007 Obituary


OVANIN 

OVANIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-24 published
Many saw TRETHEWEY as 'a member of the family'
By Vera OVANIN, Sun Media, Sun., June 24, 2007
While John TRETHEWEY was talking on his radio show about the tragic death in Saint Thomas of Jumbo the elephant, a colleague in the studio waved his shirt sleeve about like an elephant trunk, trying to get TRETHEWEY to laugh on air.
The unflappable pro didn't even chuckle.
"My father didn't skip a beat. He never lost his composure. It's a testament of his professionalism," said his youngest daughter, Nora TRETHEWEY.
TRETHEWEY died May 11 of congestive heart failure with his family at his side at University Hospital in London.
He was 83.
The broadcaster left university before getting his journalism degree to accept a job at CFPL Radio in London as a staff announcer.
"He actually had to audition for Walter Blackburn (then-owner of CFPL and The London Free Press) and then make sense of the text," said TRETHEWEY's older daughter, Margaret TRETHEWEY.
TRETHEWEY married his Stratford high school sweetheart, Jacqueline HIDER, in 1947. They had three daughters -- Margaret, Elizabeth and Nora.
They later moved to Montreal, where TRETHEWEY joined Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and launched his daily morning classical music program, Concert Time.
He went on to host the show for 18 years.
"We received e-mails from his listeners saying he was like a member of their family. Dad was in their home Monday to Friday every morning at breakfast," Nora TRETHEWEY said.
In 1977, TRETHEWEY moved to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio Canada International, where he kept listeners around the world up-to-date with the latest national and international news.
Though he lived in Quebec for more than 30 years, he and Jacqueline visited Southwestern Ontario every summer.
"Listeners often commented after meeting my dad in person that he sounded taller on the radio," Nora TRETHEWEY said.
"He was five-foot-10 but he had such a deep resonant voice that it sounded like it came from his toes."
When he retired in 1986, TRETHEWEY and his wife moved back to London.
But TRETHEWEY's love of broadcasting didn't end with retirement.
When visiting daughter Elizabeth in Phoenix, Arizona., he would get behind the microphone with her and together they would read the daily news on the Radio Reading Service for the Blind.
Back in London, TRETHEWEY volunteered with the Kiwanis Music Festival, which has established a scholarship in his name.
"My dad told me that during the Cold War, he and one of his colleagues at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation had been thoroughly investigated by the government and were deemed two people that would continue broadcasting in case of the nuclear holocaust," Nora TRETHEWEY said.
"As a kid, I thought it was kind of neat that my dad was kind of a secret spy."

  O... Names     OV... Names     OVA... Names     Welcome Home

OVANIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-30 published
PHILBRICK's laps around stadium legendary
The University of Western Ontario professor began his treks at football games in '73.
By Vera OVANIN, Sun Media, Sat., June 30, 2007
A scholar, local sports legend, painter, pianist, Canadian and American.
Allen Kellog PHILBRICK, who died Wednesday, was a renaissance man.
For 27 years, he ran a lap each time the University of Western Ontario Mustangs scored a touchdown.
And Western fans chanted with every lap.
"There was a Canadian Tire ad that had a theme, 'Albert, Albert, Albert.' Someone picked it up to praise Allen and it became a&hellip ritual," said former head football coach Larry HAYLOR.
"I remember Homecoming games where the noise of the chant was so extreme, but he would continue running and pointing to the players on the field. He did that, not just at Western, but after every game they played outside of London."
PHILBRICK, who taught geography at Western, died at University Hospital from pulmonary fibrosis.
He was 93.
PHILBRICK's wife wasn't thrilled when he began running laps at football games in 1973. He hung up his track shoes in 2000.
"I wasn't so enthusiastic about it initially, but over time, I learned to appreciate what he was trying to do," Elaine Bjorklund PHILBRICK said yesterday.
"He wanted athletes to learn to apply in academic studies the same strategy they employed in football."
PHILBRICK was born in Chicago in 1914. His father was a painter with the Art Institute of Chicago and his mother was a pianist.
Both passed on their talents to their son.
Sketching and painting were a common theme in the many different jobs he held and his family says composing at the piano was a signature of his personality.
Before teaching geography, the multi-talented PHILBRICK was also an art teacher, labour organizer, early civil rights activist and city planner in different cities and towns in the U.S.
He served in the Second World War as captain in the U.S. Army Air Force
PHILBRICK joined Western in 1965 and retired in 1979.
HAYLOR described him as a wonderful Canadian who was loyal to his birth country.
"He was a great Canadian-American," HAYLOR said.
PHILBRICK is survived by his wife, his son, Allen James PHILBRICK, and his family.
There will be no funeral. A public celebration of PHILBRICK's life will be held in the fall.
Retired Free Press sports writer Bob GAGE, who often interviewed PHILBRICK, said he was quite a character who gave a lot of spirit to the Mustangs.
"Being an academic, you'd think he wouldn't care too much about sports, but he cared a lot about the team, and travelled with the guys, too," GAGE said.
"I thought very highly of him."

  O... Names     OV... Names     OVA... Names     Welcome Home

OVANIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-08 published
Farm life taught veteran importance of helping
By Vera OVANIN, Sun Media, Sun., July 8, 2007
When Second World War veteran Frederick JONES learned his friend's mother was ticketed for parking in a wheelchair-designated spot despite having a handicapped sticker on her car, he took it up with the city hall -- and won.
"That was the type of person that he was," said friend Sandra COLLIER, who volunteered with JONES at the Riverview Group Kiwanis Club for almost 10 years.
"He was very conscious of detail and he was very helpful."
JONES died of heart failure on June 21 in the Perley-Rideau Veterans' Health Centre in Ottawa.
He was 88.
JONES's spent his early years on several farms in Southwestern Ontario.
"My father was taught all the values that were part of farming life, to hang in there when things were tough, and to be as helpful as you could and honest as you could," said Kathy JONES, his eldest daughter.
"They translated into his life and he was very well rounded.
"My sisters and I would often joke that he could fix anything with a piece of wire and a Swiss army knife."
JONES enrolled in mechanical engineering at the University of Toronto, but took a break to join the Royal Air Force in 1941, where he became a pilot.
"When Poland was invaded, he was absolutely enraged. He felt Nazis had taken too much territory," his daughter said.
Soon after, JONES enlisted and trained others to fly Tiger Moths, Harvards and Spitfires before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force in Britain.
Postwar, he obtained his engineering degree and rejoined the Royal Canadian Air Force, retiring from the forces as a lieutenant colonel in 1970, before working in the University of Western Ontario's office of the registrar until 1983.
He also volunteered with community groups, including Meals on Wheels.
JONES was known for creating H.E.L.P., a London program that ensure lists of seniors' medications are placed where emergency personnel can find them.
He was active with the Oakridge Presbyterian Church, where he enjoyed making music with the bell choir.
JONES is survived by daughters Kathy, Susan, Janis, Patricia and Rosemary. son Peter died in infancy.
"My father always treated us no differently because we were girls," said Janis JONES, an Ottawa architect. "He suggested to me to go into engineering and always took us camping,"
JONES's wife, Lillian, to whom he was married for 54 years, died of cancer in 1995.

  O... Names     OV... Names     OVA... Names     Welcome Home

OVANIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-24 published
Victims hard-working, respected farmers
By April KEMICK and Vera OVANIN, Sun Media, Tues., July 24, 2007
Though police refused to identify the elderly couple slain in their home yesterday, neighbours and sources close to the family said they were longtime Mount Carmel residents Bill and Helene REGIER.
Phone calls made to several Regiers listed under Dashwood were met with emotional rejection.
"My family is grieving," said a woman at a Regier residence before hanging up the phone.
Neighbours confirmed police were on scene at the REGIER farm on Bronson Line north of Mount Carmel, where Bill and Helene had lived for decades.
The REGIERs, both in their 70s, were "hard-working" farmers who attended Our Lady of Mount Carmel Roman Catholic church for years, Friends said.
"They are very, very nice people, very respected in the community," said South Huron Coun. Jim DIETRICH, who has known the couple all his life.
"It's going to be a loss."
The couple had three sons, DIETRICH said.
Mike BRUNEEL, principal of Our Lady of Mount Carmel school, where Bill REGIER worked for years as a custodian, said the couple will be sorely missed.
The community -- home to the REGIERs' children and grandchildren has been rocked by their deaths, he said.
"These were two pillars of the community who were deeply loved by everybody," BRUNEEL said.
"We're still reeling from the shock."
Dale REGIER, one of the couple's sons, is the custodian at Our Lady of Mount Carmel and the couple's grandchildren attend the school, BRUNEEL said.
Though the elderly couple had downsized their farming operation in recent years, the REGIERs were still raising sheep and working on the farm, neighbours said.
"This is so bizarre," said neighbour Paul MCINNES/MCINNIS, who lives less than a kilometre from the REGIERs' farm, which was cordoned off and crawling with police officers yesterday.
"I just saw (Bill) on Saturday. He was out burning garbage."
The elderly couple were "hard-working" people, he said.
"They were great people."

  O... Names     OV... Names     OVA... Names     Welcome Home

OVANIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-08-26 published
POCOCK bravely conquered a disability
By Vera OVANIN, Sun Media, Sun., August 26, 2007
Peter POCOCK was an accomplished academic. He wrote books, chaired committees and attended functions.
He did it all -- and more -- while living with a severe form of cerebral palsy that, among other restrictions, left him with control of only one of his fingers.
"Many people suggested that we give him up and put him in a home for the disabled. But my husband and I decided Peter was our child and that we would do anything to help him," said POCOCK's mother, Jane POCOCK of London.
"We acknowledged him and treated him as any ordinary child."
POCOCK died July 28 at the Queen Elizabeth Centre in Toronto from complications after several falls.
He was 62.
Doctors predicted he wouldn't live past 40. But it wasn't the only time he beat the odds.
POCOCK earned a diploma from Fanshawe College and a degree in journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto.
He also held a master's degree in divinity from the University of Toronto and wrote a book about Toronto's cathedrals.
"There was absolutely no segregation in our family. There was nothing Peter wasn't included in -- fights, too," said his younger sister, Anne Margaret PEARCE, a retired teacher who lives in Woodstock.
Despite his disability, POCOCK attended a regular school and took part in all family affairs.
POCOCK's family spearheaded the development of Woodeden Camp for the disabled in London, as well as the London Crippled Children's Treatment Centre.
POCOCK served as a committee member of the Toronto Transit Commission's Wheel Trans service for the disabled.
He was also a member of the Toronto Historical Board and the Lion's Club.
He is survived by his mother, siblings Ann Margaret, Nancy POCOCK of Newmarket and Douglas POCOCK of Oakville.
"His life is a monument to hope that you can keep going. He was a happy man," Pearce said.

  O... Names     OV... Names     OVA... Names     Welcome Home

OVANIN - All Categories in OGSPI