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"SWE" 2007 Obituary


SWEENEY  SWEEZEY  SWEIGER  SWENSON  SWERDFEGER  SWERDFIGER 

SWEENEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-11 published
SWEENEY, Joseph Edward
At Grey Bruce Health Services on Wednesday January 9, 2008, Joseph Edward SWEENEY of Markdale. Survived by brothers and sisters: Raymond (Kay), Leonard (Dale), Jim (Heidi), Norma, Betty, Alvin and Frank. Predeceased by parents Irene and Bill SWEENEY and three sisters. Ed started his own construction company in 1981 and served as councilor for Glenelg Township. Cremation has taken place. A family memorial service will be held at May Funeral Home, Markdale on Wednesday January 16th at 2: 00 p.m. If desired, donations to your charity of choice would be appreciated.

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-03 published
DEWAR, Barbara Ann (née SWEENEY)
In hospital on Sunday, July 1, 2007, from injuries incurred in a fall, Barbara Ann DEWAR of Kanata, Ontario. Daughter of the late William James SWEENEY and Bessie Beatrice SWEENEY of Pembroke, Ontario. She is survived by her loving husband Daniel Bevis DEWAR, son Peter DEWAR and daughter Sarah LEAHY (Stephen.) Cherished grandmother of Daniel DEWAR and Kevin and Kira LEAHY. Friends may call at the Carp Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 115 Rivington Street, Carp on Wednesday, July 4, 2007 from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Thursday, July 5, 2007 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Saint Mary's Anglican Church, Dunrobin Ontario on Friday, July 6, 2007 at 3 p.m. Those wishing may make donations to the Ontario Brain Injury Association, P.O. Box 2338, St. Catherine's, Ontario, L2R 7R9 Condolences, tributes or donations may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
GRASSBY, Robert Leigh, P.Eng. (1920-2007)
Peacefully at Saint Mary's Hospital surrounded by his loving family on Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007. Husband of the late Joan O'HARA and Florence WALSH. Dear father of Leigh, Janet (Pierre CHOLETTE,) Robert (Lynn SWEENEY), John (Rhonda HAMEL- SMITH), Brian (Joanna BENNETT) and Elizabeth (Mike STEFAN.) Grandfather of Timothy, Shaughn and Katie McAULIFFE, Eric (Joanna MacLEOD,) Jennifer and Emily CHOLETTE, Ryan and Robyn GRASSBY, Andrew, Jamie and Alex (Fritzy) GRASSBY, Maggie and Robbie Hamel-Smith GRASSBY, Riley and Samantha STEFAN. son of the late Arthur GRASSBY and Amelia MARRIN of Winnipeg. Predeceased by his brothers, Gerald, Edward, Hugh, Kenneth, Richard and his three sisters Louise, Marguerite and Joyce. Survived by his brother James of Sudbury. Robert was President and Chief Executive Officer of Montreal Locomotive Works, V.P. of Dominion Bridge and Plant Engineer and Manager of research and development for Robert Mitchell Co. He was also President and board member of Saint Mary's Hospital, V.P. and director of Engineer's Club, board member of Hermitage Club, Honorary member of The Royal Montreal Golf Club and board member of Concordia University. During the war years he served in Northwest Europe, Italy and United Kingdom as a lieutenant, captain and acting major. He was a strong, loving, interested father and grandfather who leaves behind a supportive loving family who hope to follow his lead. Visitation at the Kane and Fetterly Funeral Home, 5301 Decarie Blvd., Montreal, Québec (corner Isabella) on Friday from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Edmund of Canterbury Church (corner St. Charles and Beaconsfield), Beaconsfield, on Saturday, October 27 at 2: 00 p.m. If desired, donations may be made in his memory to the Saint Mary's Hospital Foundation, 3830 Lacombe Ave., Montreal, H3T 1M5. Condolences may be received at www.kanefetterly.com

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-12 published
SWEENEY, John
Lover, father, writer, television producer. Born in Toronto in the last century. Died June 28, in Toronto, of colon cancer, never revealing his age.
By Anne-Marie SWEENEY, Page L6
John had a powerful personality and a warm, rich voice. When John spoke, people listened. And he liked to talk. A lot.
Socializing was one of John's favourite things. He was often the centre of attention, no matter how large the group.
John was a good listener, too. And he was thoughtful in the most rudimentary meaning of the word - he liked to think and he spent a great deal of time doing just that. His positive outlook on life, combined with his depth and wealth of knowledge, made him the ideal person from whom to get sound advice.
John grew up in Toronto's east end with his sister Janice and brothers Joe and Jim, plus a host of characters who came and went over the years, guests of John's mother, Lettie, who could never say no to someone in need. John's father, Frank, was a strict disciplinarian with a big heart. John inherited all of his parents' best qualities.
John was head of the social committee at Neil McNeil High School before advancing to the University of Windsor and York University as a drama student. After earning his degrees, John worked in theatre, debated philosophy and travelled. He gave up his life as an actor to spend more time with family following the birth of his daughter Rhiann.
John's first marriage ended after five years, but his bond with Rhiann only grew stronger. He considered Rhiann the most important part of his life.
Together, they welcomed John's true love, Anne-Marie, into their family. He met her at a golf course, yet neither one golfed they were there for a fundraiser. Anne-Marie would not give John her phone number, something that just didn't happen to him.
John eventually got Anne-Marie's number from a mutual friend and talked her into a first date. They lingered in the restaurant after dinner, caught up in the magic of the evening, and John proposed. Anne-Marie readily accepted.
For the past 25 years, whenever the couple travelled they were asked, without fail, "Are you on your honeymoon?" John always answered, "Yes!"
Following their marriage, John returned to his creative roots, working as a television producer.
Thanks to his youthful exuberance and his good looks, John was often mistaken as being much, much younger than he was. Whenever possible he avoided admitting the truth.
And so, in his memory, his date of birth has been omitted from this piece. To those who loved him best, John was always, and will remain, ageless.
Anne-Marie SWEENEY is John's wife.

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-15 published
GRAY/GREY, Muriel May (née BEAUFIELD)
Passed peacefully away on Wednesday, December 12, 2007, at Arborstone Enhanced Care after a twelve-year struggle with Parkinson's Disease. She was in her 74th year and was predeceased in 2005 by her devoted and beloved husband of 46 years, Peter Forbes GRAY/GREY, her mother Margaret in 1996, father Charles in 1980 and brother Raymond in 2003. Leaving to mourn, her daughter Susan (Clayton DICKSON/DIXON) and grand_son Oliver, Halifax, Nova Scotia; son John (Lisa) and grand_son Gunnar, San Diego; two brothers, Calmond (Daisy), Ship Cove, Newfoundland, and Guy (Juanita), Saint_John's, Newfoundland and five sisters, Faye (Ross SWEENEY,) Halifax, Nova Scotia Marie (Scott SMITH), St. Andrews, New Brunswick; Patricia (Bud BEST) and Elaine (Hedley LANGDON,) St. Anthony, Newfoundland Pamela (Brian GUY,) Saint_John's, Newfoundland, and a large number of relatives and Friends. Described by her siblings as effortlessly clever, she completed high school at the age of fifteen and began teaching at the age of sixteen, first at L'Anse au Clair, Labrador, and later at her hometown, Raleigh. In 1953, after receiving her Laboratory Technician Certificate, she began working at the St. Clairs Mercy Hospital, Saint_John's, Newfoundland. Beautiful but shy, Muriel was introduced to her future husband Peter by a friend of the family. At the time, Peter was working with McNamara Construction building a highway in the Witless Bay area. He was young, handsome and had a charming wit that was rumoured to have won Muriel's heart by whispering in her ear 'You sure smell better than the guys at the bunkhouse!' Muriel and her family lived in Toronto, Ottawa, and Sudbury before moving to Halifax in 1973. Apart from being a dedicated mother, wife, and homemaker, she also worked for a time as an interior decorator and was known for her personal touch of having a 'sense of style'. Muriel was also respected as a tireless volunteer and committee member of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron where she served for some thirtythree years. Muriel was beautiful in mind, body, and spirit she had a musical laugh and a wonderful, self-depreciating sense of humour, and a gentle touch that made her unique to all who knew her. She adored her two grand_sons and was well enough to enjoy them both as young children. A sincere thank-you to the thirdfloor staff of Arborstone Enhanced Care for their kindness and dedication to Muriel and her family these past two years. Donations in Muriel's memory may be made to the Parkinson's Society of Canada. E-mail condolences to: susang@ca.ns.sympatico.ca.

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
'Man with four hands' was one of the greatest piano players of all time
Canadian whose flying fingers mesmerized audiences around the world - from small clubs in 1950s Montreal to the lights of Carnegie Hall - was a lyrical stylist and a mentor to many
By Nicholas JENNINGS, Special to The Globe and Mail with reports from Canadian Press and staff, Page S9
Toronto -- Few pianists swung as hard or played as fast and with as many grace notes as Oscar PETERSON. The classically trained musician could play it all, from Chopin and Liszt to blues, stride, boogie, bebop and beyond. He led his own jazz trios, performed with such legendary figures as Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, DIzzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong - the latter called him "the man with four hands" - recorded more than 200 albums and wrote such memorable works as Hymn to Freedom and the Canadiana Suite. "A virtuoso without peer," concluded his biographer, Gene Lees, in The Will to Swing.
"The piano is like an extension of his own physical being," composer and clarinetist Phil NIMMONS, who helped create Canadiana Suite, said in 1975 of his long-time friend. "I'm amazed at the speed of his creativity. I am not talking about mere technical capabilities, although his are awesome. I'm speaking of the times when you find him under optimum conditions of creativity. His mind can move as quickly as his fingers and that is what is so astounding."
The story of Oscar PETERSON's rise from immigrant poverty to world fame is one of popular music's great inspirational tales. Born in Montreal's Saint-Henri district, he was the fourth of five children of a Canadian Pacific Railway porter and his wife who came to Canada from the Virgin Islands. His father, Daniel, a self-taught amateur musician and a strict disciplinarian, insisted that his children develop musical skills. Oscar began on piano and trumpet, but dropped the latter after a bout with tuberculosis when he was 7.
By 14, he was studying with Paul de Marky, a renowned Hungarian-born classical pianist who piqued his interest in jazz, particularly works by pianist Art Tatum. Mr. PETERSON always credited his sister Daisy, a noted piano teacher in Montreal who also taught such Canadian musicians as Oliver Jones and Joe Sealy, with being an important teacher and influence on his career. Soon, he was winning competitions. But his father never let it go to his head. He played his son Tatum's renowned recording of Tiger Rag that caused the young musician to quit piano for two months.
Mr. PETERSON always said it was his father who instilled in him an unwavering will to succeed. When he dropped out of high school to play in the Johnny Holmes Orchestra, becoming its only black member, a displeased Daniel PETERSON gave him some stern advice. "He told me, 'If you're going to go out there and be a piano player, don't just be another one. Be the best.' "
The 17-year-old took the words to heart. Within a few years, he was leading his own trio at Montreal's Alberta Lounge, where he developed his distinctive style and attracted some illustrious onlookers, including Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald. Then, on one fateful night, American jazz impresario Norman Granz heard Mr. PETERSON at the club and was so impressed that he invited him to play at New York's Carnegie Hall.
Mr. PETERSON's appearance on Mr. Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic program in 1949 was a watershed event. Mr. PETERSON didn't have a work visa, so Mr. Granz decided to introduce him as a surprise guest on a bill that included Charlie Parker, Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins. Although the young pianist was terrified, Mr. Granz assured him it would be worth it. "He told me, 'You'll know if you have what it takes, and if you do what you do and they love it, then you know you've made it,' Mr. PETERSON later recalled.
Performing with bassist Ray BROWN, who would become a long-time sideman, Mr. PETERSON brought the house down with such songs as Fine and Dandy and Tenderly. The 24-year-old "stopped the concert dead cold in its tracks," according to Down Beat magazine, which added that the pianist displayed "a flashy right hand, a load of bop and a good sense of harmonic development." Mr. PETERSON's course - with Mr. Granz as his manager - was set.
Over the next 50 years, Mr. PETERSON played in a variety of trios, including those with Mr. BROWN and guitarist Herb Ellis (1953-1958,) Mr. BROWN and drummer Ed THIGPEN (1959-1964,) bassist Sam Jones and drummer Bobby Durham (mid-60s) and guitarist Joe Pass and bassist Niels Pedersen (late 1960s). During this time, he recorded such memorable albums as 1956's Stratford Festival recording, 1958's On the Town, recorded at Toronto's Town Tavern, and 1962's Night Train, which included a number of Duke Ellington pieces as well as Mr. PETERSON's own Hymn to Freedom. Then, in 1964, he produced his best-known work, Canadiana Suite, with each of the album's tracks inspired by a different region of the country. Mr. PETERSON called the project "my musical portrait of the Canada I love," and it was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1965.
By 1979, his career had arrived at a point where he was in steady demand and his life had developed a certain stability. He built a recording studio in his house and set aside enough time most mornings to "ring out some different pieces of equipment and get myself together," he told The Globe and Mail. "I'll maybe come up with something I would want to get started writing."
The studio was irresistible, he said. Later in the day, usually after attending a business meetings elsewhere in the house, he liked to return to the keyboard "to work on some writing, or maybe rehearse a little music."
By all accounts, Mr. PETERSON led two lives - one on the road and one at home. "I work probably six solid weeks then take off a month or two. My work is like that. If I tour, it is usually three or four weeks and when it's over it's done."
When he wasn't away, Mr. PETERSON seldom liked to leave the house. But the constant touring remained a trial before he brought order to his life. "It can be very harried during touring, but we try to control that now. I have to know where I'm going one way or another. I feel that if I have to go on the road I'm not going to stay the Young Women's Christian Association, and I'm not going to eat at the Big Burger. If I go to France, for instance, I eat at the best possible restaurants and stay in the best hotel. I like the finer things in life and I think I deserve what I can afford. I don't thing there's anything wrong with shooting for the best. It's unfortunate that a few more of us don't think that way."
The travelling took its toll on many of Mr. PETERSON's sidemen, who gave up work with the master because personal or health reasons. Some fell victim to the bottle or drugs. Mr. PETERSON, who always avoided such things, kept going, and performed solo frequently in the 1970s. But he paid his own price for touring, which kept him from his wives and children. "How destructive was [the road] for me?" he once asked a CBS reporter. "Almost four divorces - that's how destructive it can be."
Mr. PETERSON recounted in his 2002 autobiography, A Jazz Odyssey, how his breakup with third wife, Charlotte, separated him from their son, Joel, for whom he wrote the tune He Has Gone. "They now live somewhere in Eastern Canada," he wrote. "This had been a dreadful loss." He seemed to find happiness in his fourth marriage to Kelly GREEN, with whom he had a daughter, Céline, in 1991, when he was 66. He credited them with helping him to find a balance between family and music.
"When you first start out, you're impatient, uptight," he once said. "Everything has to be done right now, it doesn't matter what you might like it to be." Later, he said he became a little more sensible about all of life's elements. "You realize that some of the things that you want to do require a depth that you won't have until you're more mature. Even then, there are things that you still can't get together."
Mr. PETERSON possessed a boyish sense of humour and was renowned for his love of laughter. He was also a notorious practical joker. His mischievous side was something that came through in two documentaries: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The Life and Times of Oscar PETERSON and the National Film Board's In the Key of Oscar, which was produced by his niece, former basketball star and Canadian Olympian Sylvia SWEENEY. The latter film recounted some of the early incidents of racism that Mr. PETERSON encountered in his career and featured his emotional journey back to Montreal for the first reunion of the extended PETERSON family, including grandchildren who had previously only ever seen him on television.
Beyond his career and family, Mr. PETERSON pursued his twin hobbies of photography and fly fishing, which he undertook at a summer home in Ontario's Haliburton Highlands. It was also at the cottage that he followed an interest in the heavens. "I'm an amateur astronomer, when I have time, which is usually in the summer at our cottage," he once told The Globe.
He also involved himself in the academic side of music. In 1960, he opened the Advanced School of Contemporary Music in Toronto with Mr. BROWN, Mr. THIGPEN and Mr. NIMMONS. Mr. PETERSON's students included Skip Beckwith, Brian BROWNe, Wray Downes and Bill King. Although his touring commitments forced the school to close in 1964, Mr. PETERSON returned to teaching at Toronto's York University in 1986, when he was appointed as adjunct professor of music in jazz studies. He remained involved with the university afterward, serving as its chancellor from 1991 to 1994.
A two-date reunion in 1990 with his most famous trio, featuring Ray BROWN and Herb Ellis (also featuring drummer Bobby Durham) at New York's Blue Note: club resulted in four separate album releases. Critics hailed Mr. PETERSON's playing from this legendary engagement, citing his emotional depth and softer playing style. Three years later, while performing again at the Blue Note, Mr. PETERSON suffered a stroke, something he only realized after returning to Toronto to receive the Glenn Gould Prize. The stroke weakened his left hand and sidelined him for two years, during which time he fell into a depression. But he credited Friends such as bassist Dave Young for encouraging him to return to performance, which he did with the help of intensive physiotherapy. In 1999, he returned to Carnegie Hall with guitarist Ulf Wakenius, bassist Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen and drummer Martin Drew. His left hand could no longer "conjure the rumbling musical earthquakes of old," wrote The New York Times, but his right hand's inventive, fluid work alone prompted several standing ovations.
Two years earlier at the Grammys, he had been given a Lifetime Achievement Award. In all, he won eight Grammys and, in 2005, Canada Post marked his contributions to music with a 50-cent stamp.
A lyrical stylist who has been described as one of the greatest piano layers of all time, Mr. PETERSON inspired countless musicians. Duke Ellington called him "a man who's blessed with great talent, has acquired tremendous skill and executes it with unlimited authority." Ella Fitzgerald said of him, "to me, he's like a brother and a friend, and one of the greatest you'll ever meet."
Diana Krall, who celebrated Mr. PETERSON's 80th birthday with him in 2005 at his home in Mississauga, Ontario, recalled how he invited her down to his basement studio. "He said, 'Hey, Dee, come down and check out the box,' which meant his 10-foot Boesendorfer [piano]," Ms. Krall recalled. "The only problem was then you have to play for him. So I played some Nat Cole tunes and we sang some duets. The fact that I got a chance to sit and talk with him, and laugh with him and his family, is pretty great. It stays with you." Added Ms. Krall: "If I ever feel like I'm needing a boost, I listen to Oscar."
His personal studio represented a dream that was a long time coming, Mr. PETERSON said in 1979. "Years ago, I always wanted this studio, but there was no way I could because I was out playing all the time. But now, with the new studio and the chance to do some composing, it's much easier. I can pursue the love of my life, and yet it's my profession."
Oscar Emmanuel PETERSON was born in Montreal on August 15, 1925. He died of kidney failure at his home in Mississauga, Ontario, on December 23, 2007. He was 82. He leaves his wife, Kelly, and six children from different marriages: Lynn, Gay, Oscar Jr., Norman, Joel and Celine.

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
The humble legend
'He was one of the last of the giants, but his music and contributions will be eternal.' Jazz impresario Quincy Jones 'He was a regular on the French stage, where the public adored his luminous style.' French President Nicolas Sarkozy 'He was the kindest, gentlest, most forgiving person on the face of the earth.' Senator and jazz pianist Tommy Banks
By Peter CHENEY, Page A1
Mississauga -- The street is pleasant but ordinary, and so is the house, a two-storey monument to the forgettable architecture of the late 1960s. There's a two-car garage, a neatly kept lawn and a driveway flanked by a pair of coach lamps. But look closer, and you realize that this is a very special house indeed.
There is a windowless brick addition that looks like a military command centre, and on the front door, carved into the wood so subtly that you might miss it, is the face of one of the world's most famous and respected musicians - jazz legend Oscar PETERSON, once described as "the maharaja of the piano."
Mr. PETERSON, who died this weekend at 82, put Canada on the world musical map and helped forge a new era in race relations. Yet he spent much of his life in a world drawn straight from The Brady Bunch, a universe of suburban tract homes, strip malls and winding avenues with names like King Forrest Drive and Friar Tuck Boulevard.
Although his choice of neighbourhoods surprised many, Mr. PETERSON loved Mississauga. "He felt at home there," said his niece, Sylvia SWEENEY. "It was his world."
Mr. PETERSON's house was tweaked to his special needs. There was a soundproof brick studio that held his Bosendorfer grand piano and multitrack recording suite. The bay windows that faced the street were replaced with opaque glass blocks, to prevent the curious from spying. But this was not the home of a star.
"All he wanted was an ordinary life," Gene LEES, who authored a biography of Mr. PETERSON, said. "He wasn't a celebrity show-off."
To those who knew him best, Mr. PETERSON's address was the result of his love-hate relationship with Canada and its approach to visible minorities. The musician chose Mississauga in the early 1970s after being snubbed by a landlord in Toronto's wealthy Forest Hill neighbourhood who refused to rent to him because he was black.
In the suburbs, Mr. PETERSON found a new, more open society. Although it was largely white, Mississauga seemed more amenable to change, if only because it lacked the crushing social history of downtown Toronto, still a White, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant bastion at the time.
"I think it was a case of not being rejected," Ms. SWEENEY said. "In Mississauga, he got a chance to know his neighbours and build a history together."
Mr. PETERSON, the son of a railroad porter, was a musical icon by the time he reached his mid-20s. He learned to play the piano from his sister Daisy (who went on to become a world-renowned music instructor) and dazzled fans around the world with his impeccable technique and musical imagination. But in Canada, where blacks were still a tiny minority, Mr. PETERSON felt himself largely shut out by a white-dominated musical and cultural establishment that controlled access to key venues - particularly the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which Mr. PETERSON loathed until the end of his life.
Mr. PETERSON played a critical role in the battle for equal rights, using his professional stature and personal dignity to help erode long-standing barriers. Mr. LEES, a former Hamilton Spectator reporter who went on to become the editor of a music magazine and Mr. PETERSON's biographer, met him in 1951, when Mr. PETERSON was caught up in a racial dispute. Mr. LEES was assigned to cover the story when a Hamilton barber refused to cut Mr. PETERSON's hair because he was black.
Mr. LEES came away impressed by Mr. PETERSON's strength of character, and by his humanity. Although he pursued the complaint against the barber because he was offended by the man's prejudiced attitude, Mr. PETERSON later spoke on the barber's behalf when Hamilton city officials moved to revoke his business licence.
"He was never a nasty guy," Mr. LEES said. "And he believed that the point had been made. He was angry about what had happened, but he didn't want to destroy the man. He said: 'This is Canada. Here, the law is on my side.' "
His long Friendship with Mr. PETERSON and other black jazz greats gave Mr. LEES an inside view of the rejection they faced - even though they were wealthy and famous, many experienced racism in its cruellest, rawest form. He remembered how Mr. PETERSON was threatened by redneck Southern sheriffs, and how the manager of a Ritz-Carlton hotel in the 1960s tried to stop him from performing, saying, "That nigger isn't coming into this hotel."
Mr. PETERSON fought racism on several fronts. In the early 1970s, he lobbied to have more minorities on television shows and advertisements, in the belief that white-dominated media marginalized other cultures.
"He thought that kids got their view of the world from what they saw on television," Ms. SWEENEY said. "He was way ahead of his time."
Mr. PETERSON married four times. His first wife was black. The others were white. This surprised Mr. LEES, who believed that Mr. PETERSON had rejected mixed marriage - he had told his biographer that unions between blacks and whites demanded "incredible intellectual unselfishness."
When Mr. LEES asked Mr. PETERSON about his apparent about-face, the musician listened patiently, then explained that Mr. LEES had failed to understand him: "I didn't say I was against it," he said. "I just said it was hard."
To his neighbours in Mississauga, Mr. PETERSON was a compelling figure, an unpretentious, decent man who happened to be a world-renowned musical genius.
"He was very gracious," said Renneth BEGBIE, a retired school teacher who lived next to Mr. PETERSON for 22 years. "So is his family."
Mr. PETERSON wore his fame lightly, Ms. BEGBIE said. He and his wife sent her a Christmas card each year, and apologized for the mess when they landscaped their yard. In return, she treated Mr. PETERSON as he wished - like anybody else.
"That's just common sense," she said. "He was my neighbour. People need to be respected and appreciated for who they are. If Julia Roberts lived next door, I'd do the same thing."
Award highlights
Oscar PETERSON accumulated about 100 awards, prizes and honorary degrees, eight Grammys and two Junos.
1972: Officer, Order of Canada.
1978: Inducted, Juno Hall of Fame.
1984: Companion, Order of Canada.
1992: Governor-General's Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement.
1997: Grammy for Lifetime Achievement and an International Jazz Hall of Fame Award.
1999: Praemium Imperiale Award, the Nobel equivalent for the arts.
2000: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization International Music Prize.

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SWEENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-29 published
PETERSON, Oscar E., C.C., O.Ont., LLD., D.Mus.
Peacefully at home on Sunday December 23rd, 2007 with his loving wife Kelly and his daughter Celine by his side. Oscar is also survived by his children Norman, Joel, Gay PARR, Lynn SPINNEY and the late Sharon BLACKBURN and Oscar PETERSON Jr. Dear brother of Daisy SWEENEY, May PETERSON, Phil PETERSON; and the late Fred and Chuck PETERSON. He will always be remembered by his grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A private funeral service was held. A public Celebration of Oscar's Life and Legacy will take place in the future. Information regarding the details of this Service can be found at www.oscarpeterson.com or www.neweduk.com. In memory of Oscar, donations to World Vision Canada or the Christian Children's Fund of Canada would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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SWEEZEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-15 published
HERBERT, Georgia Beryl
Suddenly at the North Bay General Hospital on Thursday September 13, 2007 at the age of 82. Beloved wife of William of Tara. Dear mother of Mark and Renate of Tara and Merren of Kitchener. Loving Nana to Angela, Steven (Cathy), Dana (Jon), Mark Jr. (Julie), and Kelly (Rene). Great Nana to Britney, T.J., Payton and Evan. Dear sister of Clifford SWEEZEY of Pembroke, Dreana LEATHERDALE and Dehlia FINCHEN, both of North Bay. Predeceased by sister Ruth LOMAS. She will be missed by many nieces and nephews as well as all her Friends she played bridge with. Georgia had a special place in her heart for Special Needs Children and Seniors with whom she volunteered regularly. Friends may call at Paul H. Eagleson Funeral Home in Tara on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Monday, September 17, 2007 at 2 p.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Lung Association would be greatly appreciated. Condolences may be expressed online at www.paulheaglesonfuneralhome.ca

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SWEIGER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-15 published
NUTTALL, Orland
At the Southampton Care Centre on Saturday, October 13th, 2007 at the age of 84 years, Orland NUTTALL of Port Elgin. Husband of the late Margaret McGILLIVRAY and the late Jeannine CHARPENTIER. Father of Larry of Waterloo and Gary and his wife Ellen of Etobicoke. Grandfather of Fraser, Spencer and Heather. Brother of Margaret LEIGHTON, Mima and her husband Mac McGILLIVRAY, Les and his wife Muriel, Wallace, Sherwood “Bud” and his wife Leona, Shirley and her husband Carm SWEIGER, Marlene and her husband Harvey DAVIDSON, Don and his wife Eleanor, and Alexina and her husband Mike ATKINSON. Stepfather of Norman DESMARIAS, Raymond DESMARIAS, Leo DESMARIAS, and Rita GODIN. He is predeceased by his sister Lenore KING. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin, (Town of Saugeen Shores) from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. on Monday. Funeral services will be conducted in the chapel on Tuesday at 1: 00 p.m. with the Rev. Robert WIDDOWSON officiating. The Royal Canadian Legion Branch #340, Port Elgin will hold a memorial service in the funeral home on Monday evening at 6: 45 p.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery, Oshawa. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Arthritis Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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SWENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-13 published
SWENSON, Bernard " Ben"
Veteran World War 2. Retired Businessman
Passed away at Good Samaritan Seniors Complex, Alliston, Ontario on Monday, June 11, 2007, in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of Lois PINGLE of Alliston, Ontario Loved father of Larry SWENSON and his wife Barbara Jane of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Sharon SWENSON of Toronto, Ontario, Debbie and her husband Tom HOGARTH of Windsor, Ontario Loving grandpa of Stephanie and her husband Andrew JONES, Samantha SWENSON, Alex and her husband Gord HARTLEY, Ainsley and Madison HOGARTH. Dear brother of Mary and her husband George HAIG and predeceased by Oscar SWENSON, John SWENSON, Sophie ERICKSON, Carrie PEARSON and Ingla GROOME. Dear brother-in-law of Edith BURR, Phyllis McROBBIE, Ann SPICER, Bruce and Donna PINGLE. Ben will be fondly remembered by his nieces, nephews and Friends. Resting at W. John Thomas Funeral Home, 244 Victoria Street, E., Alliston on Wednesday, June 13, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, June 14, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. If so desired, memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated.

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SWERDFEGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-28 published
HILL, William John " Bill"
R.C.N.V.R. of the Second World War. Bill was Manager with Imperial Life Assurance, former Church Warden and Lay Reader with St. Cuthbert's Anglican Church, Toronto, past member of the Rotary Club in Leaside, member of the Guelph-Wellington Men's Club and a faithful churchman at St. George's Anglican Church, Guelph.
Bill passed away peacefully surrounded by his family at the Guelph General Hospital on Wednesday, December 26, 2007 in his 85th year. Dearest husband of 60 years to Joan (née CARTER) of Guelph. Dearest father of Andrew and wife Joan of Barrie, Barbara and husband David CLARK of Lakefield and Carolyn and husband Robert LOEWEN of Toronto. Dear grandpa to Jason and Jessica HILL, Melanie and husband Dean SWERDFEGER, Sarah and husband Antony CLARK, Jennifer CLARK and husband Ruben KUBEITZ, Michael LOEWEN, Elizabeth LOEWEN and husband Mark ANDREWS and the late Pamela HILL. Great-grandpa of David, Daniel and Alexander. Brother to Ruth WILTON and husband the Rev. Ralph WILTON. Predeceased by his parents William and Martha HILL of North Bay. Family and Friends will be received at St. George's Anglican Church, 99 Woolwich Street, Guelph, for one hour prior to the funeral service which will be held at 3: 00 p.m. on Sunday, December 30, 2007, conducted by the Archdeacon Thomas M. GREENE. Memorial contributions to the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund, 80 Hayden Street Toronto M4Y 3G2 or St. George's Anglican Church, 99 Woolwich Street, Guelph N1H 3V1 or a charity of one's choice would be appreciated.

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SWERDFIGER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-26 published
SWERDFIGER, Dalton
At Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound, Sunday September 23, 2007. Dalton Edward SWERDFIGER of Eugenia, in his 68th year. Beloved husband of Denise SWERDFIGER (née LARABIE.) Loving son of Flossie SWERDFIGER of Prescott. Dear father of Donna CAPPELLO (Gerry) of Glencairn, Deborah ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of Eugenia, David SWERDFIGER of Stratford and Derek SWERDFIGER of Brantford. Loving grandfather of Alicia, Calvin and Jordan CAPPELLO; Bryanna MacLACHLAN; Stephanie and Andy SWERDFIGER; and Steven COWPER; and great-grandfather of Anakyn and Hayden. Sadly missed by sister Margie and brothers Donnie and Dwain. Predeceased by his father Ralph SWERDFIGER and sister Doris. The family will receive Friends at the May Funeral Home, Markdale on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m., where a funeral service will be held on Thursday September 27, 2007, at 11 a.m. Interment in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to the Diabetes Association or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
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SWERDFIGER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-25 published
SWERDFIGER, Dalton Edward
At Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound, Sunday September 23, 2007. Dalton Edward SWERDFIGER of Eugenia, in his 68th year. Beloved husband of Denise SWERDFIGER (née LARABIE.) Loving son of Flossie SWERDFIGER of Prescott. Dear father of Donna CAPPELLO (Gerry) of Glencairn, Deborah ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of Eugenia, David SWERDFIGER of Stratford and Derek SWERDFIGER of Brantford. Loving grandfather of Alicia, Calvin and Jordan CAPPELLO; Bryanna MacLACHLAN; Stephanie and Andy SWERDFIGER; and Steven COWPER; and great-grandfather of Anakyn and Hayden. Sadly missed by sister Margie and brothers Donnie and Dwain. Predeceased by his father Ralph SWERDFIGER and sister Doris. The family will receive Friends at the May Funeral Home, Markdale on Wednesday from 7-9: 00 p.m., where a funeral service will be held on Thursday September 27th, 2007, at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Markdale Cemetery. If desired memorial donations to the Diabetes Association or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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