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"McNI" 2007 Obituary


MCNICHOL  MCNICKEL  MCNICOL  MCNIE  MCNISH  MCNIVEN 

McNICHOL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-23 published
BATTY, Frank Sanderson, Flight Sgt (Ret..)
Peacefully at Lee Manor in Owen Sound on Thursday, June 21, in his 91st year. Frank was an Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force veteran of 33 years service. He joined the Royal Air Force in 1937 and served throughout the Second World War. He was especially proud of his air crew service during the Battle Of Britain in the squadron commanded by Sqdn. Leader Douglas Bader, the Royal Air Force's famous legless pilot. After the war Frank transferred to the Royal Canadian Air Force and served in Canada until his retirement in 1967. He was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 6, Owen Sound. After his air force service Frank worked for the Ontario Department of Highways until 1982. He is survived by his wife Beatrix BATTY (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON,) step-son Phil McNICHOL, and three granddaughters, Susan REID, Kathleen FLOOD and Marie McNICHOL. He was the cherished “Grandpa” of seven great-grandchildren, Amber, Brandi, Daniel, Monica, Marina, Asia and Allie. Cremation has taken place. In keeping with Frank's wishes there will be no funeral service. Expressions of sympathy can be sent to Tannahill Funeral Home, 519-376-3710. In lieu of flowers donations can be made in Frank's name to World Vision Canada.

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McNICKEL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-17 published
KAUFMAN, Joan Marie (née McDONALD)
Of Chesley, passed away at South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Chesley on Wednesday, August 15, 2007 in her 72nd year. Loving mother of Janice HAMEL of Walkerton and Ron KAUFMAN and his friend Jessica BOLTON of Hanover. Cherished grandmother of Jason HAMEL, Laura HAMEL, Katelyn KAUFMAN and Christina KAUFMAN. Joan will be fondly remembered by her sister, Audrey and her husband Jack McNICKEL of Bolton. She was predeceased by her parents, Stuart and Hazel (BURNS) McDONALD. Visitation will be held at Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Monday, August 20, 2007 at 11 a.m. Interment Chesley Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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McNICOL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-05 published
FISHER, Carole Lee (née McNICOL)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Carole on December 1st, 2007 with her family at her side at Hamilton General Hospital, after a brief illness. Carole will be deeply missed by her husband Roger who was her constant companion for 45 years. Her only daughter Tracey (EBENHARDT) will miss her best friend. Tracey's husband Scott EBENHARDT will miss a dear mother-in-law. Carole leaves behind her sister Kiera BROWN and her daughter Melodie DAVLUT, sister-in-law Sheila VIINIKKA and husband Tauno and their son Taisto and his wife Julia. Most of all her beautiful granddaughters Helana and Alexandra EBENHARDT will miss the love and care showered on them by Carole.
Carole also leaves behind a wonderful group of Friends who have been a great support for the family over the last couple of weeks. Carole will always be remembered for her incredible style and grace and for her special ability of making Friends wherever she went. Our heartfelt thanks to the talented, dedicated and caring surgeons, doctors, nurses, and staff at Hamilton General Intensive Care Unit East for making Carole's stay as comfortable as possible.
A Celebration of Life followed by a get together of family and Friends will be held at The Ward Funeral Home, 109 Reynolds Street, Oakville (905-844-3221) on Thursday, December 6th, 2007 at 3: 00 p.m. Email condolences may be sent to
carole.fisher@wardfh.com

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McNIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-12 published
McWILLIAMS, David Ireland, Q.C., LLB, B.Sc. (Mil.,) Lieutenant Colonel (Ret'd)
In London, Ontario, on October 9, 2007 at Longworth Long Term Care in his 85th year. Predeceased earlier this year by his beloved wife Beverly Jane (née BROUGH.) Will be sadly missed by his children, Melanie of Windsor, Wendy (Scott McNIE) and Sheila (Michel VALLEE,) both of Nanaimo, British Columbia, Holly (Paul BERTON) of London, Ontario, and David of Hoboken, New Jersey, and grandchildren: Nicholas, Stephen and Alexandra VALLEE, Harris and Heidi BERTON, and Liam and Robin McNIE. Also survived by his brother Peter of Oakville, Ontario. Born in Toronto 1922, David attended Upper Canada College, then Royal Military College (#2721) and finally Osgoode Hall. He met Beverly while articling in Windsor, and there they made their home. For 47 years, he practised law and committed himself to his adopted community, chairing and/or sitting on boards of numerous local organizations, including Essex County's Children's Aid Society, Essex Law Association and Ontario Legal Aid Plan, the District Health Council and Essex County Hospital Planning Council. He was a former chair and founding member of St Clair College, Canterbury College (U. of Windsor), and the Greater Windsor Community Foundation. David's war service took him to the U.S.A., the North Pacific, Britain, Italy, and Northwest Europe with the Lord Strathcona's Horse (RC), Canadian Armoured Corps, The First Special Service Force, (2nd Canadian Parachute Battalion), First Infantry Brigade, and mustering out as captain and company commander with the Royal Canadian Regiment. Postwar service was with the Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment, where he was appointed Honourary Lieutenant Colonel in 1998. Funeral service in Windsor at Saint Mary's Anglican Church (Walkerville) on 15 October 2007 at 11: 30 a.m. followed by interment of his ashes along with those of his beloved Beverly. No flowers at his express request. In lieu, donations may be made to the Canterbury College (U. of Windsor) Community or to the David and Beverly McWilliams Endowment Fund for Saint Mary's Church (Walkerville).

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McNISH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
Retirement was only the start
Stan SMITH, founder of Over 55 London, died Saturday at 87.
By Joe MATYAS, Free Press Reporter, Wed., January 10, 2007
Stan SMITH came to London at age 65 to retire and be close to family members.
He soon built a legacy that survives his passing at the age of SMITH died peacefully on Saturday at Victoria Hospital after a terminal illness, surrounded by his family, his son said yesterday.
"As a family, we're very proud of what he did after closing the door on his career," said his son, Martyn SMITH of London. "It was quite an accomplishment."
"He was a good man who founded the only organization of its kind in Ontario," said Ron McNISH, acting executive director of the organization -- Over 55 London Inc.
"He wanted to do something to give people like himself opportunities to continue using their skills and experience and he did it."
For more than two decades, Over 55 London has helped hundreds of registered members find small casual jobs and temporary, part-time or full-time contractual work, said McNISH.
"We've had 14,000 people contact our organization with small jobs that needed to be done and 75 per cent of the clients were seniors."
The work done by Over 55 members often helps seniors stay in their homes, McNISH said.
"Our members do things clients can't do themselves, everything from basic electrical and plumbing jobs to painting, grass cutting and walking dogs."
Over 55 members are also employed as accountants, sales staff, drivers, bakers and production line workers, said McNISH.
"Stan was aware that people of his generation had things like good work ethics, loyalty to employers and punctuality going for them, and it soon became apparent employers appreciated those qualities, too."
Today, Over 55 is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health, City of London, TD Canada Trust, Human Re-sources Development Canada, foundations, service clubs, corporate and individual donations.
Martyn SMITH said his father was "a fun-loving, 'can do' kind of guy. He always thought positively and never looked at the downside of things."
His father's 22 years in London were a departure from his earlier life when job demands required frequent family moves, said Martyn.
"We changed homes and schools about every year and a half when I was younger," he said. "It helped me to become independent and self-sufficient."
Stan served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War and the merchant marine after the war, said Martyn.
"He was on two ships that were torpedoed and spent hours in the water. He said he was strengthened by those experiences."
In Canada, Stan SMITH had a long career as an employee of catering business in Edmonton, Sault Ste. Marie, Hamilton, St. Catharines, Toronto and Ottawa.
He also taught catering at Centennial College in Toronto and owned and operated a restaurant and motel in Grimsby for five years.
SMITH is survived by his wife Marie and three sons, Martyn, Howard and Andrew.
Visitations are set for the Westview Funeral Chapel on Wonderland Road today. A memorial service will be held tomorrow at 11 a.m. at St. Aidan's Anglican Church on Oxford Street West.

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McNIVEN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-09-26 published
McNIVEN, Dan (December 5, 1966-September 28, 1983)
In Loving Memory of a Wonderful son and Brother
"You were someone very special,
Who can never be replaced.
Your memory in our daily lives,
Can never be erased."
Sadly Missed, Mom, Dad, Grandma, John Jr. and Family
Page 12

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McNIVEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
The hurtin' life of a Milton man
By Peter CHENEY, Page M1
Wayne CHAPMAN's final stage was a warped square of plywood on the roof outside his $110-a-week rented room. He would strum his guitar, look out over the rooftops of Milton, and remember the glory days when he played with the legendary Stompin' Tom Connors.
Last week, Mr. CHAPMAN's guitar was placed in his casket, a final tribute to a man whose life exemplified the hurtin' ethos of country, the music he loved the best. Long divorced, the 52-year-old lived in a boarding house with 14 other men, many of them down on their luck. His previous residence was a room above a tavern. Mr. CHAPMAN worked as a custodian at a car-parts plant, cleaning the cafeteria and changing toilet-paper rolls.
"He didn't have much," said Ken MURRAY, the superintendent of the boarding house. "But he was a good guy."
Like Stompin' Tom, whose experiences included hard labour, abandonment and poverty, Mr. CHAPMAN was a genuine country music character, informed by heartache and loss. His possessions were limited to a few guitars and some beaten furniture. He had lived for a while in Georgetown, but moved to Milton after he was targeted in a series of robberies. His entertainment consisted of buying a case of Molson Canadian to drink with Friends. He rode to work each day on a hand-me-down mountain bike he called "The Dirty Dawg."
In Milton, he lived in a single room, where he cooked his meals in a microwave and washed his dishes in a shared bathroom. Unlike Mr. Connors, who lives in a comfortable home in a nearby township, Mr. CHAPMAN had never made enough to escape the endless cycle of low-paid day jobs. But to country music insiders, his time on stage with Mr. Connors meant that he had been validated, if not financially rewarded.
Mr. CHAPMAN's death was a strange one. On August 23, he came home from work, and went out on the roof with his guitar and a few beers.
His second-floor room was one of the hottest in the house. He liked to escape the heat by stepping out onto the roof through his window, where he would play Stompin' Tom and Johnny Cash tunes on his weathered acoustic guitar.
This day, he was joined by one of his housemates, who shared a beer with him. It was late afternoon, and the weather was perfect. The roof was the size of an average room - it was a poor man's deck, with a flat black top and no railings. As usual, there were a few yellow-jacket wasps buzzing around. The insects had built a nest inside a crack in the building's brick wall, and had defied the superintendent's extermination efforts.
Mr. CHAPMAN hated the yellow jackets. Just weeks before, he had jammed a stick into the nest, against the superintendent's recommendation, checking to see if a recent spraying had killed them off. It hadn't. Now he was in a fighting mood. He fetched a fly-swatter and began swinging at the wasps. It was a bad idea. He had unwittingly triggered the wasps' defence mechanism, and countless more poured out of the nest to help their embattled fellows.
Mr. CHAPMAN soon found himself in a full-on battle, walking backwards and using his swatter to try to fend off the growing insect horde. In the room below, Mr. MURRAY heard his footsteps on the rooftop. "Jesus," he thought. "I told him to stay out of there."
There was a thud. Consumed with his battle with the wasps, Mr. CHAPMAN had stepped off the edge of the roof and fallen six metres to the pavement. He was rushed to the Milton hospital, then airlifted to Saint Michael's in Toronto. He died of his injuries and a forensic autopsy was performed the next day. His death was ruled accidental.
"It's a very sad case," said Detective Murray DRINKWALTER of Halton Regional Police.
It was the end of a sad life, whose highlight was a 1985 appearance on a Stompin' Tom Connors album called Stompin' Tom Is Back to Assist Canadian Talent. Mr. CHAPMAN contributed two songs (My Home Town and The Bars of Vancouver) and was pictured on the cover, dressed in black jeans and a Stetson.
The album was propped on his coffin this week at his small funeral in Erin, Ontario Among the visitors at the funeral home, according to locals, was Stompin' Tom, who dropped by to pay his final respects to a fallen musical comrade. Also there were his mother and some of his brothers and sisters. The family, along with Mr. Connors, declined to talk about Mr. CHAPMAN, but others filled in a few of the blanks.
According to Fred WHITE/WHYTE, his supervisor at the car-parts plant, Stompin' Tom entered Mr. CHAPMAN's life when his father took in the iconic singer many years ago during a dark period.
"He came home one day, and there was this tall, skinny guy," said Mr. WHITE/WHYTE. "It was Stompin' Tom."
Mr. CHAPMAN went on to perform occasionally with Mr. Connors, and never stopped talking about how amazing it was to play with a genuine musical legend. "To him, Stompin' Tom was the second coming of Jesus," said Mr. MURRAY. "He loved him."
"A lot of musicians would give anything to play with Stompin' Tom," said Duncan FREMLIN, a guitarist who used to tour with Mr. Connors. "He's the real thing."
His thoughts were echoed by Bob McNIVEN, a guitarist who toured with Mr. Connors in the early 1980s. "Stompin' Tom is a legend," he said. "To play with him was an accomplishment." Mr. McNIVEN, who now works for Statistics Canada but still plays in a country band called Whiskey Jack, has never forgotten the talent and commitment that Mr. Connors brought to his performances.
"He really meant it. He'd be singing, and there were tears running down his face. You'd look out into the audience, and they were crying too."
Although he didn't know Mr. CHAPMAN (hundreds of musicians have toured with Mr. Connors's various bands,) Mr. McNIVEN said he felt a pang of recognition when he heard about the death last week. "He played guitar with Stompin' Tom. I played guitar with Stompin' Tom. In some way we were brothers. We drank from the same cup."
Back at the rooming house where Mr. CHAPMAN died, Mr. MURRAY also reflected on his companion's life and times. "He didn't have a mean bone in his body," said Mr. MURRAY as he drank his fourth tumbler of Silk Tassel scotch. "He was a good guy. But he should have left those wasps alone."
Mr. MURRAY, now 66, spent about 30 years as a professional country musician, playing in clubs and bars and, briefly, for a Montreal-based television show. Like Mr. CHAPMAN was, he's divorced and lives alone with his dusty musical equipment.
"I'm a has-been," he says. "We're all has-beens here.
"Here's to Wayne."

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