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"RYD" 2008 Obituary


RYDALL  RYDER  RYDZIK 

RYDALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-08 published
RYDALL, Kay
In loving memory of our Mom and Nana, Kay RYDALL who passed away on April 8, 2007. May the winds of love blow softly And whisper so you'll hear We'll always love and miss you And wish that you were here Lovingly remembered by Sue, Mark, Connor and Laura ADAM/ADAMS.

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RYDALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-17 published
HESS, William " Bill"
Peacefully at his home on Friday, May 16, 2008, William "Bill" HESS of Woodstock in his 73rd year. Dearest husband of Audrey (née GREEN) for 50 years. Loving father of David HESS (Jill HOSSACK) of Woodstock, Cathy HOLT (Jim McBRIDE) of Ingersoll, and Paul HESS (Brenda) of Woodstock. Much loved Grandpa of Greg HOLT, and Meg and Jenny HESS, all of Ingersoll. Dear uncle of Susan and Mark ADAM/ADAMS and great-uncle of Connor and Laura ADAM/ADAMS. Predeceased by his parents Albert and Margaret HESS, his sister Kay RYDALL and brother-in-law Don RYDALL, and his parents-in-law Clarence and Kay GREEN. Sadly missed by his favourite companion Molly. Bill was a funeral director in Woodstock with the Rowell Funeral Home and the Mac Smith Funeral Home for 50 years. His favourite pastime was enjoying cottage life. Friends will be received at the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, 69 Wellington Street North, Woodstock on Tuesday, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the chapel on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, the Canadian Diabetes Association, or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. Smith-LeRoy, (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may be sent at www.smithleroy.com

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RYDER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-23 published
MILNE, Peter Ignatius
Peacefully, with his loving wife by his side at London Health Sciences Centre University Hospital, on Friday, February 22, 2008, Peter Ignatius MILNE in his 86th year. Survived by his loving wife and best friend Edna (BEDARD.) Proud and loving father of Larry (Charmaine), of Ilderton, Peter (Rachel) of Victoria, British Columbia, Jim of London, Leo (Carolyn) of Saint Marys, Chris, Kevin, Dennis (Lori), of London, Mary (Ron) Flannery of Komoka, Clarence of London, and Lisa of Windsor. Loving grandfather of 26, and great-grandfather of 6. Dear brother of Donald, Fr. Paul, and Eleanor (Ev) MUIR. Brother-in-law of Gabe, Pat MOIR, Jean KOCHUT, Jean BEDARD, Eulene RYDER, Clement (Natalie) BEDARD, and Mary Anne MASSE. Survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his son Paul (2004), and his parents Robert and Jeannette, brothers James, Eugene, Clem, and Basil, and by sisters Cecilia, Irene GILMORE, Mary MOIR, brothers and sisters-in-law Jim GILMORE, Ruth MILNE, Toni MILNE, Nora (Lucian) CORRIVEAU, Percy (Marie) BEDARD, Ritchie BEDARD, Benny BEDARD, Nelson BEDARD, George KOCHUT, Frank RYDER and Michael MASSE. Visitors will be received at the John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo St. at King Street, London, on Sunday, February 24th, from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Parish Prayers in the funeral home Sunday evening at 8 o'clock. Funeral Mass to be celebrated at Holy Family Parish, 777 Valetta Street, on Monday morning February 25th, at 10: 00 o'clock. Spring interment in St. Peters Cemetery, Zurich, Ontario. Those wishing to make a memorial donation are asked to please consider the Alzheimer Society, the Canadian Diabetes Society, or a charity of choice.

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RYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-03 published
His landmark commission on drugs urged legalizing marijuana in Already a respected legal scholar, he became an improbable counterculture icon at the height of the hippy era by recommending leniency and the decriminalization of recreational drugs
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S6
Toronto -- Gerald LE DAIN's respect for civil liberties went so far as to rouse John Lennon and Yoko Ono from their bed. It was 1969, the year of the couple's "bed-in for peace" at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, and the year Judge LE DAIN began chairing the much-referenced but largely ignored Commission of Inquiry into the Non-Medical Use of Drugs.
The Le Dain commission's final report was one of the most politically explosive documents ever put before the federal government. The commission held 46 days of public hearings, received 365 submissions and heard from 12,000 people in about 30 cities and at more than 20 university campuses across the country. In its final report, in 1973, the commission recommended decriminalizing marijuana possession because the law-enforcement costs of prohibition were too great, and suggested that Canada focus on frank education rather than harsh penalization. It also recommended treatment for heroin addiction and sharp warnings about nicotine and alcohol. This was delivered at a time when hysteria about the evils of pot was on everyone's lips and many parents wanted the law to save their drug-addled teenagers.
The report also made Judge LE DAIN something of an unlikely counterculture icon and helped win him a place on the Supreme Court of Canada during the formative years of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Gerald LE DAIN was born in Montreal to Eric LE DAIN and Antoinette WHITHARD. His younger brother, Bruce, went on to become one of Canada's foremost impressionist landscape painters in the style of A.Y. Jackson and Tom Thomson. Gerry graduated from West Hill High School in 1942 and a year later, at 18, he joined the army and became a gunner with the 7th Medium Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, a unit that was in the thick of the fighting from D-Day until the surrender of Germany in May of 1945.
Immediately after the war, he attended the military's ad hoc Khaki University in England. One day, the school arranged a debate with students of Westfield College, then a women-only college associated with the University of London. During the event (debate topic: a woman's place in the home,) he met Cynthia Emily ROY and, two weeks later, they became engaged. After being demobilized from the army, she joined him in Montreal, where they married and he set about finishing his education.
In 1949, he obtained a law degree from McGill University and was called to the Quebec bar. He spent the following year at a university in Lyons, where he gained his doctorate. On his return from France, he joined the Montreal law firm of Walker, Martineau, Chauvin, Walker and Allison and stayed three years until he returned to McGill as a professor of constitutional and administrative law. He also worked as counsel to Quebec's attorney-general on constitutional cases.
In 1967, he left Montreal to become dean of Osgoode Hall Law School, where, said colleague Harry Arthurs, he presided over a revolution in Canadian legal education. "It was his responsibility to persuade York University, the Law Society of Upper Canada, and the world at large, that what we were doing was not only the legitimate - not only the sensible - but the inevitable way forward." It was during this time that Pierre Trudeau asked Judge LE DAIN to chair the commission. He was, at 44, perfectly suited to the job in many ways. By then, many young Canadians were indulging in marijuana and other recreational drugs; as a university professor, he was surrounded by many students who had at least given it a try. And as the father of a large family, he was adept at bridging the generation gap and responding empathetically. During the time he chaired the commission, there were four full-fledged teenagers, and one on the cusp, living in the LE DAIN home.
The commissioners were asked to study the non-medical use of sedative, stimulant, tranquillizing, hallucinogenic and other psychotropic drugs or substances, including the experience of users. At his first news conference in 1969, he announced that, in the interest of research, he might experiment with the stuff himself.
"We made it possible to talk about drugs openly," he later said in an interview with The Globe and Mail. "In some of our early hearings, especially in smaller communities, you could feel the guilt that had been stored up around drugs. We also made it possible for people to criticize their institutions, to challenge their doctors, their school boards, their churches."
The Le Dain commission broke new ground in terms of taking the show on the road, said Mel GREEN, who worked as a sociologist with Judge LE DAIN at the time. Judge LE DAIN redefined the nature of a public inquiry by asking the public to directly participate, he said. "The commission found little traction in terms of changes in the law itself. … There was a cultural divide between conventional attitudes and youth culture and I think the Le Dain commission helped bridge that gap." Inspired by Judge LE DAIN, Mr. GREEN decided to switch careers and went to law school. He is now an Ontario provincial court judge.
By early 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono had created a stir with their public "bed-in" at a hotel in Amsterdam. On May 26, the couple booked into Room 1742 at the Queen Elizabeth in Montreal. To Judge LE DAIN, they seemed to be just the kind of advocates for youth the commission should hear from. A meeting was arranged aboard a C.N. train in Montreal and, for 90 minutes, the couple shared their views on the drug culture and the generation gap. "This is the opportunity for Canada to lead the world," said Mr. Lennon, referring to the Le Dain commission. "Canada's image is just about getting groovy, you know." When it was over, Mr. Lennon gave his phone number to members of the commission.
It was not always such clear sailing. Commissioners also had to contend with a kind of "live bait" issue, where police were arresting young people who braved the generational divide to attend these public gatherings and tell their stories. In 1969, the 16-year-old son of communications theorist Marshall McLUHAN was arrested as he was leaving a coffee shop in Yorkville, Toronto's then-hippy neighbourhood, where the commission was meeting. Michael McLUHAN was convicted of criminal possession of a small amount of hashish and sentenced to 60 days in jail; he ended up serving 30 days and was eventually pardoned.
Marie-Andrée Bertrand, one of the Le Dain commissioners, remembers those days and the difficulties in protecting witnesses. "Some of us went to [then-solicitor-general Pierre] Goyer and we said, 'Call off your gendarmes, monsieur!' and went to Trudeau, and it was slightly more calm after that," she told the Ottawa Citizen in 2003. "Imagine if Monsieur Lennon had been arrested or harassed. What a humiliation that would have been for all of us."
Although the commission's recommendations were never followed, there were significant changes in the public attitude toward drugs and in lighter sentences being handed down to offenders.
At a time when the generation gap was described as a gulf, Judge LE DAIN had gained the respect of both sides of the drug-use argument. In a 1988 Globe and Mail column, Michael VALPY described him as a quiet, intellectual, spiritually minded academic who earned the praise of young people, the social agencies and the scientific community. "His commission acquired the reputation of being the most hard-working, open-minded and widely respected ever to tackle a major national problem."
In 1975, Judge LE DAIN was appointed to the Federal Court of Appeal and the Court Martial Appeal Court. He remained there until May of 1984, when Mr. Trudeau appointed him to the Supreme Court.
His tenure at the court during the early years of the Charter proved to be, in some ways, a trial by fire not only for him but for the other eight justices as well. A 1988 Globe and Mail article described a series of crises that nearly exhausted the court as a result of a backlog of Charter cases. At the time, it was referred to by political scientist Peter Russell as "A terrible rash of injuries" similar to the kind experienced by beleaguered players on a hockey team.
Not surprisingly, Judge LE DAIN was one of the members of the court who struggled most during this time. As a result, he stayed only five years before an emotional breakdown brought about his retirement in 1988. Even so, he left his mark on Charter decisions.
One example was the case of R. v. Therens (1985). The issue was whether a drunk driver could evade conviction on the grounds that police had violated his Charter rights by not informing him of his right to call a lawyer before compelling him to take a breathalyzer test. Judge LE DAIN's former law clerk, Bruce RYDER, recalls that he struggled painfully over the case - partly because it recalled the death of his daughter Jacqueline a decade earlier from an automobile accident.
"As he spoke, he was pounding himself so hard in the chest I thought he might knock himself over. He took a deep breath, and we returned to our work." In the end, Judge LE DAIN crafted an opinion that did right by the victims of highway accidents and by the Charter. In memorable language, he affirmed that the enactment of the Charter signalled a new era in the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms.
"Out of complexity and nuance, he produced masterfully succinct statements of the law," said Mr. RYDER.
In his retirement, Judge LE DAIN worked on a range of projects, including preparing his papers for the national archives and meticulously crafting his memoirs. But his early retirement continued to be plagued by personal tragedy: first with his wife Cynthia's death in 1995 of cancer, then his daughter Catherine's death of pneumonia in 1998.
In 1990, the U.S. Drug Policy Alliance instituted an award in Gerald LE DAIN's name, to be given to individuals involved in law who have worked within official institutions "when extremist pressures dominate government policies." The influential organization includes law-enforcement officials, academics, professionals, health-care workers, drug users and former users. "We sought to name the awards after our heroes," said founder Arnold Trebach. "Gerald LE DAIN was certainly one of them. Few people realize the level of hate directed at drug users and drug policy reformers decades ago."
Judge LE DAIN, the first Canadian to be so honoured, had earlier been made a companion of the Order of Canada.
Gerald Eric LE DAIN was born on November 27, 1924, in Montreal. He died in his sleep at home on December 18, 2007. He was 83. He is survived by his son Eric and daughters Barbara, Jennifer and Caroline. He was predeceased by his wife, Cynthia, and by daughters Jacqueline and Catherine.
Correction - Friday, January 4, 2007
The majority of the Le Dain Commission on the non-medical use of drugs recommended in 1973 that possession of cannabis should cease to be a criminal offence but that sale and distribution of cannabis should remain a crime. Incorrect information appeared in a headline in yesterday's paper.

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RYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-25 published
ANDERSON, Ruth Irene, R.N.
On Sunday 23rd, March 2008 at Saint Michael's Hospital, after a brief illness. Ruth Irene ANDERSON, in her 83rd year, daughter of the late Andrew and Rene. Dear sister of John and his wife Mardi, Margaret and her husband Alec MASTERS, and the late Mary. Beloved aunt of Howard and Carolyn (RYDER) of Calgary, Mimi and Wolfgang HOFMANN of Kingston, David MASTERS, Ted and Peggy MASTERS. Fondly remembered by Friends, cousins, and her great nieces and nephews: Bronwyn and Duncan ANDERSON of Calgary, Stephanie, Matthew and Jayson MASTERS. Ruth was a graduate in 1947 of the nursing program at Toronto East General Hospital and subsequently earned the diploma in Public Health. She was very active in her career in Public Health Nursing in the inner city, which was followed by rehabilitation work at Hillcrest Hospital. Service in the Chapel at Pinehills Cemetery, 625 Birchmount Rd. north of St. Clair Ave. East on Thursday, March 27 at 1: 30 p.m.

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RYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-18 published
Stelco metallurgist led a second life as an award-winning filmmaker
Steel-company lab technician produced more than 30 nature films, including Miracle of the Bees. Sometimes, 'I waited 12 hours to get a shot that lasts only 10 seconds'
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Jack CAREY had a strong affection for insects. As one of Canada's leading nature cinematographers and film producers, he sometimes spent entire nights watching the metamorphosis of a dragonfly. "I've waited 12 hours to get a shot that lasts only 10 seconds," he said.
Another time, speaking about capturing close-ups, he told The Hamilton Spectator: "I've got to be able to move in and show an aphid giving birth, where you've got a tiny animal the size of the head of a pin on a rosebush."
In the process, he was credited with filming the only existing footage of a lace-wing fly larva camouflaging itself with aphid fluff.
Mr. CAREY, whose day job was that of a metallurgist, produced more than 30 nature films, including The Monarch Butterfly Story, The Everglades, Wonders of the Hive and Success Story, a film exploring why insects are likely to inherit the Earth. His first nature film, and perhaps his best known, is The Miracle of the Bees. He filmed the documentary on the life cycle of the honey bee long before there was an environmental concern over their possible extinction. The movie was shown at Italy's National Institute of Apiculture and won highest science award at a film festival in Rome in 1958.
Mr. CAREY regarded himself as a home-grown biologist. He did most of his filming in his basement, where he had several aquariums perched on a billiard table, or in the woods a few kilometres from his ranch house in Burlington, Ontario His documentaries became a common feast for North American school children. They were also shown on David Suzuki's The Nature of Things and the American television show The Wild Kingdom. His films have been viewed by millions of people in 70 countries and have been translated into eight languages.
For a change of pace, he sometimes packed up his equipment and shot big game on wildlife reserves in India, South Africa, Kenya and Sri Lanka. While gently rocking on the back of an elephant, he focused his lens on the rare one-horned rhino, four-horned antelopes and the Asiatic lion in India's Gir Forest. Birds included wild peacocks, hoopoes, grey wagtails and golden-backed woodpeckers. His films were shown on Audubon Wildlife Theatre, a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation series that ran from 1968 to 1974.
Jack CAREY hailed from Hamilton, in the shadow of a steel smelter, back before the Depression. His father, William CAREY, emigrated from England after fighting in the Boer War. He was a plasterer and his wife Mariah (RYDER) took in laundry. Jack was the youngest of five children and his big sister, Dolly, handed him his first Kodak Brownie box camera when he was 7. He remembered crawling through the bushes on his belly trying to sneak up on birds, but they always got away. When he was 15, his mother died of cancer, prompting him to put away his camera and take on more serious work. After finishing high school at Hamilton Technical Institute he took a job in the labs at Stelco, quickly working his way into the executive ranks as chief service metallurgist.
In 1932, while he was still employed at Stelco, he and his sister opened a portrait studio. They kept themselves busy shooting portraits of children and Saturday brides in flowing veils. After a while, he couldn't stand weddings, preferring woods and ponds over chapels. In the early 1950s, for a change of scene, he smuggled his camera into the steel plant. His photos were soon admired by the company's president, who commissioned Mr. CAREY to produce his first commercial documentary, Steel for Canadians, in 1952. The film Tells both the Stelco story and the process of steelmaking. Mr. CAREY said this was a challenging task, filming huge mills and molten metal.
The steel film was soon followed by the award-winning The Miracle of the Bees in 1957. The Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly came a few years later. His career as a nature cinematographer had fully taken flight.
During the 1960s, Mr. CAREY produced a series of documentaries called Spring Hike, Summer Hike, and Winter Hike. It told the story of two boys exploring a local pond. Although he never married or had children, Mr. CAREY was keenly interested in encouraging young people to get out of the house and muck about in murky water. "I try to make the kids say, 'Gee, I want to go out and see that for myself," he once told the Toronto Star.
His nephew Dave CAREY was one of the boys in the film. He recalls Uncle Jack hauling him out of bed at the crack of dawn on cold winter mornings to cart a big parabolic reflector - twice the size of a satellite dish - to bird feeders near Hamilton or Burlington before traffic noise would overwhelm the sounds of early-morning bird calls. He loved it.
As a member of the Hamilton Naturalists Club, Mr. CAREY often hiked the Niagara Escarpment with wildlife painter Robert BATEMAN. Mr. BATEMAN was impressed by how a Stelco executive crawled around on his hands and knees, prompting bugs to smile for the camera. Mr. CAREY became an early collector of Mr. BATEMAN's paintings and a collaboration developed between the two.
"Jack was a person of many opinions as well as good judgment," Mr. BATEMAN said. "He often made comments on paintings in progress." For instance, to paint Goshawk and Ruffled Grouse, an picture that hung over Mr. CAREY's piano for decades, Mr. BATEMAN used for reference a single frame from a CAREY film. He then added a dead grouse that had been killed on the road, and a fallen aspen to complete the realistic work. It was one of 11 BATEMAN paintings that Mr. CAREY eventually donated to the Hamilton Art Gallery.
In 1975, Mr. CAREY retired from Stelco. But instead of grabbing his golf clubs, he pocketed his passport, hoisted his equipment across his shoulder and took off for distant shores. According to a 1978 Star article, that meant Africa and the Galapagos and points in between, "to film everything from elephants to ants."
Sometimes humans - naked humans - inadvertently got in the way. One day, while filming in the woods of Ontario, he stumbled upon a nudist colony. He had his camera pointed at a nest where the mother bird had just stuffed a big dragonfly into the mouth of a tiny nestling, when a "muscular and red-faced" man suddenly began shouting: "Nobody's allowed to take pictures here!"
He soon observed the nestlings "about ready to take off at any minute like a helicopter," and calmed down, Mr. CAREY recalled.
"You don't have to go," the man said. "Keep right on shooting."
In 1979, Mr. CAREY used six motion-picture cameras, 30 different lenses, two microscopes, and time-lapse photography to painstaking film Success Story. The documentary profiled the lives of insects and suggested why the tiny creatures, so often crunched under our feet, would likely outlive the human race. He made his point by drawing on analogies to humans. For instance, he said that if a human baby gained weight in the same proportion as a young worm, it would gain several tonnes in a few months. "When they're eating leaves and things like that, wings would be a damned nuisance, so they have nice grasping legs so they can hang onto the leaves. When they change their lifestyle completely to breed, then they develop wings."
Insects will inherit the Earth, he said, because their life span is short and although they are vulnerable to predators, there are always many, many more coming down the line. In 1978, the film won a gold plaque at the Miami Film Festival and was judged the best educational film among 2,000 entries from around the world. Because of his work on Success Story, Mr. CAREY was made a fellow of Britain's Royal Photographic Society the next year.
His close-up world didn't just involve nature footage. As a collector or, some would say, a packrat, he turned part of his basement into something he dubbed the "Canada Room." Greeting visitors as they stepped through the door was a pair of stuffed lynxes, after which they stumbled on everything else. "We've found a book about the interesting habits of birds and animals that Jack wrote when he was 10," said Dave CAREY, who recently cleared away much of the material. "Also a bone from a blue whale, his grandfather's military will dated 1918, Christmas cards dated back a hundred years and a freezer full of decades-old French River blueberries."
John J. CAREY was born September 22, 1912, in Hamilton. He died June 3, 2008, in Dundas, Ontario after complications from a fall. He was 95. He is survived by several generations of nieces and nephews, many Friends and many viewers.

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RYDZIK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-12 published
BASKIN, Linda
Suddenly with family by her side on Sunday, March 9th, 2008 at Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie. Linda is survived by her husband Richard RYDZIK, and her loving son Jason. She will be missed by her brother David MILLER and his wife Lorraine, loving mother Alma, nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by her father George MILLER. Friends will be received at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main Street North (Markham Rd.), Markham on Thursday at 11 a.m., reception to follow service. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Royal Victoria Hospital would be appreciated. Online condolences www.dixongarland.com

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