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"McLU" 2008 Obituary


MCLUHAN  MCLURE  MCLURG 

McLUHAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-03-14 published
PEER, Margaret “Marg” Roberta (THOMAS)
Of Wiarton peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services Wiarton on Thursday, March 13th, 2008. The former Margaret Roberta THOMAS in her 92nd year. Loving mother of Murray (Irene), of Owen Sound Keith (Sharon,) of R.R.#3 Owen Sound; Doreen (Bob McLUHAN,) of North Bay; and Norma (Joseph DENOBLE,) of Kitchener. Cherished grandmother of Mary Lou HILLS, Ian PEER, Michele MENG, Dwight PEER, Leanne McALLISTER, Nancy LALANI, Keith PEER Jr., Shawn McLUHAN, Jeffrey McLUHAN, Paul McLUHAN, Heidi McARTHUR, Melissa DENOBLE and Nicole DENOBLE. Great-grandmother of 22; and great-great-grandmother of 2. Devoted sister to Les THOMAS, of Wiarton. Sadly missed by her sisters-in-law Joanne and Audrey; and her many nieces and nephews. Marg is predeceased by her husband Norman; four brothers; four sisters; and a great-grandchild, Adam. She will always be remembered for her quilting and knitting skills, and especially for her biscuits, butter tarts and home-made bread. Marg was a long time member of Bide-A-Wee, Saint_John's United Church United Church Women, and the Limpert Lodge Seniors' Club. Family invite Friends to call at the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel, Sauble Beach (519) 422-0041 on Friday, March 14, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A service to celebrate Marg's life will be conducted from Saint_John's United Church, Wiarton on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. Ed LAKSMANIS officiating. Interment in Eastnor Cemetery. Donations to Saint_John's United Church, Pike Bay United Church, or the Bruce Peninsula Health Services Foundation would be appreciated. In living memory of Marg a Flowering Crabapple tree will be planted in the funeral home meadow by the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel. Condolences may be expressed on-line at www.whitcroftfuneralhome.com

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McLUHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-03 published
His landmark commission on drugs urged legalizing marijuana in Already a respected legal scholar, he became an improbable counterculture icon at the height of the hippy era by recommending leniency and the decriminalization of recreational drugs
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S6
Toronto -- Gerald LE DAIN's respect for civil liberties went so far as to rouse John Lennon and Yoko Ono from their bed. It was 1969, the year of the couple's "bed-in for peace" at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, and the year Judge LE DAIN began chairing the much-referenced but largely ignored Commission of Inquiry into the Non-Medical Use of Drugs.
The Le Dain commission's final report was one of the most politically explosive documents ever put before the federal government. The commission held 46 days of public hearings, received 365 submissions and heard from 12,000 people in about 30 cities and at more than 20 university campuses across the country. In its final report, in 1973, the commission recommended decriminalizing marijuana possession because the law-enforcement costs of prohibition were too great, and suggested that Canada focus on frank education rather than harsh penalization. It also recommended treatment for heroin addiction and sharp warnings about nicotine and alcohol. This was delivered at a time when hysteria about the evils of pot was on everyone's lips and many parents wanted the law to save their drug-addled teenagers.
The report also made Judge LE DAIN something of an unlikely counterculture icon and helped win him a place on the Supreme Court of Canada during the formative years of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Gerald LE DAIN was born in Montreal to Eric LE DAIN and Antoinette WHITHARD. His younger brother, Bruce, went on to become one of Canada's foremost impressionist landscape painters in the style of A.Y. Jackson and Tom Thomson. Gerry graduated from West Hill High School in 1942 and a year later, at 18, he joined the army and became a gunner with the 7th Medium Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, a unit that was in the thick of the fighting from D-Day until the surrender of Germany in May of 1945.
Immediately after the war, he attended the military's ad hoc Khaki University in England. One day, the school arranged a debate with students of Westfield College, then a women-only college associated with the University of London. During the event (debate topic: a woman's place in the home,) he met Cynthia Emily ROY and, two weeks later, they became engaged. After being demobilized from the army, she joined him in Montreal, where they married and he set about finishing his education.
In 1949, he obtained a law degree from McGill University and was called to the Quebec bar. He spent the following year at a university in Lyons, where he gained his doctorate. On his return from France, he joined the Montreal law firm of Walker, Martineau, Chauvin, Walker and Allison and stayed three years until he returned to McGill as a professor of constitutional and administrative law. He also worked as counsel to Quebec's attorney-general on constitutional cases.
In 1967, he left Montreal to become dean of Osgoode Hall Law School, where, said colleague Harry Arthurs, he presided over a revolution in Canadian legal education. "It was his responsibility to persuade York University, the Law Society of Upper Canada, and the world at large, that what we were doing was not only the legitimate - not only the sensible - but the inevitable way forward." It was during this time that Pierre Trudeau asked Judge LE DAIN to chair the commission. He was, at 44, perfectly suited to the job in many ways. By then, many young Canadians were indulging in marijuana and other recreational drugs; as a university professor, he was surrounded by many students who had at least given it a try. And as the father of a large family, he was adept at bridging the generation gap and responding empathetically. During the time he chaired the commission, there were four full-fledged teenagers, and one on the cusp, living in the LE DAIN home.
The commissioners were asked to study the non-medical use of sedative, stimulant, tranquillizing, hallucinogenic and other psychotropic drugs or substances, including the experience of users. At his first news conference in 1969, he announced that, in the interest of research, he might experiment with the stuff himself.
"We made it possible to talk about drugs openly," he later said in an interview with The Globe and Mail. "In some of our early hearings, especially in smaller communities, you could feel the guilt that had been stored up around drugs. We also made it possible for people to criticize their institutions, to challenge their doctors, their school boards, their churches."
The Le Dain commission broke new ground in terms of taking the show on the road, said Mel GREEN, who worked as a sociologist with Judge LE DAIN at the time. Judge LE DAIN redefined the nature of a public inquiry by asking the public to directly participate, he said. "The commission found little traction in terms of changes in the law itself. … There was a cultural divide between conventional attitudes and youth culture and I think the Le Dain commission helped bridge that gap." Inspired by Judge LE DAIN, Mr. GREEN decided to switch careers and went to law school. He is now an Ontario provincial court judge.
By early 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono had created a stir with their public "bed-in" at a hotel in Amsterdam. On May 26, the couple booked into Room 1742 at the Queen Elizabeth in Montreal. To Judge LE DAIN, they seemed to be just the kind of advocates for youth the commission should hear from. A meeting was arranged aboard a C.N. train in Montreal and, for 90 minutes, the couple shared their views on the drug culture and the generation gap. "This is the opportunity for Canada to lead the world," said Mr. Lennon, referring to the Le Dain commission. "Canada's image is just about getting groovy, you know." When it was over, Mr. Lennon gave his phone number to members of the commission.
It was not always such clear sailing. Commissioners also had to contend with a kind of "live bait" issue, where police were arresting young people who braved the generational divide to attend these public gatherings and tell their stories. In 1969, the 16-year-old son of communications theorist Marshall McLUHAN was arrested as he was leaving a coffee shop in Yorkville, Toronto's then-hippy neighbourhood, where the commission was meeting. Michael McLUHAN was convicted of criminal possession of a small amount of hashish and sentenced to 60 days in jail; he ended up serving 30 days and was eventually pardoned.
Marie-Andrée Bertrand, one of the Le Dain commissioners, remembers those days and the difficulties in protecting witnesses. "Some of us went to [then-solicitor-general Pierre] Goyer and we said, 'Call off your gendarmes, monsieur!' and went to Trudeau, and it was slightly more calm after that," she told the Ottawa Citizen in 2003. "Imagine if Monsieur Lennon had been arrested or harassed. What a humiliation that would have been for all of us."
Although the commission's recommendations were never followed, there were significant changes in the public attitude toward drugs and in lighter sentences being handed down to offenders.
At a time when the generation gap was described as a gulf, Judge LE DAIN had gained the respect of both sides of the drug-use argument. In a 1988 Globe and Mail column, Michael VALPY described him as a quiet, intellectual, spiritually minded academic who earned the praise of young people, the social agencies and the scientific community. "His commission acquired the reputation of being the most hard-working, open-minded and widely respected ever to tackle a major national problem."
In 1975, Judge LE DAIN was appointed to the Federal Court of Appeal and the Court Martial Appeal Court. He remained there until May of 1984, when Mr. Trudeau appointed him to the Supreme Court.
His tenure at the court during the early years of the Charter proved to be, in some ways, a trial by fire not only for him but for the other eight justices as well. A 1988 Globe and Mail article described a series of crises that nearly exhausted the court as a result of a backlog of Charter cases. At the time, it was referred to by political scientist Peter Russell as "A terrible rash of injuries" similar to the kind experienced by beleaguered players on a hockey team.
Not surprisingly, Judge LE DAIN was one of the members of the court who struggled most during this time. As a result, he stayed only five years before an emotional breakdown brought about his retirement in 1988. Even so, he left his mark on Charter decisions.
One example was the case of R. v. Therens (1985). The issue was whether a drunk driver could evade conviction on the grounds that police had violated his Charter rights by not informing him of his right to call a lawyer before compelling him to take a breathalyzer test. Judge LE DAIN's former law clerk, Bruce RYDER, recalls that he struggled painfully over the case - partly because it recalled the death of his daughter Jacqueline a decade earlier from an automobile accident.
"As he spoke, he was pounding himself so hard in the chest I thought he might knock himself over. He took a deep breath, and we returned to our work." In the end, Judge LE DAIN crafted an opinion that did right by the victims of highway accidents and by the Charter. In memorable language, he affirmed that the enactment of the Charter signalled a new era in the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms.
"Out of complexity and nuance, he produced masterfully succinct statements of the law," said Mr. RYDER.
In his retirement, Judge LE DAIN worked on a range of projects, including preparing his papers for the national archives and meticulously crafting his memoirs. But his early retirement continued to be plagued by personal tragedy: first with his wife Cynthia's death in 1995 of cancer, then his daughter Catherine's death of pneumonia in 1998.
In 1990, the U.S. Drug Policy Alliance instituted an award in Gerald LE DAIN's name, to be given to individuals involved in law who have worked within official institutions "when extremist pressures dominate government policies." The influential organization includes law-enforcement officials, academics, professionals, health-care workers, drug users and former users. "We sought to name the awards after our heroes," said founder Arnold Trebach. "Gerald LE DAIN was certainly one of them. Few people realize the level of hate directed at drug users and drug policy reformers decades ago."
Judge LE DAIN, the first Canadian to be so honoured, had earlier been made a companion of the Order of Canada.
Gerald Eric LE DAIN was born on November 27, 1924, in Montreal. He died in his sleep at home on December 18, 2007. He was 83. He is survived by his son Eric and daughters Barbara, Jennifer and Caroline. He was predeceased by his wife, Cynthia, and by daughters Jacqueline and Catherine.
Correction - Friday, January 4, 2007
The majority of the Le Dain Commission on the non-medical use of drugs recommended in 1973 that possession of cannabis should cease to be a criminal offence but that sale and distribution of cannabis should remain a crime. Incorrect information appeared in a headline in yesterday's paper.

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McLUHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-05 published
McLUHAN, Corinne (born LEWIS)
(April 11, 1912-April 4, 2008)
Died peacefully of natural causes at her home in Wychwood Park surrounded by her family. She was the beloved and loving wife and confidante of the late Marshall McLUHAN (1980;) dear sister of the late Carolyn Lewis WEINMAN (1996;) devoted and loving mother of Eric (Sabina ELLIS), Mary, Teri, Stephanie (Niels ORTVED), Elizabeth (Don MYERS,) and Michael (Danuta VALLEAU;) proud grandmother of Jennifer Colton THEUT, Emily McLuhan BOMS, Anna and Andrew McLUHAN, Claire and Madeleine McLuhan MYERS, Arthur, Mark, and Gwendolyn McLUHAN; and great-grandmother of Olivia, Charlotte, and Gillian.
Corinne was known for her beauty, grace, intelligence, wit, and Southern charm. She embraced life fully and enjoyed many rich experiences and wonderful Friendships along the way. Born in Fort Worth, Texas, Corinne proudly remained an American all her life. She graduated from Texas Christian University and went on to do graduate work in theatre at the leading drama school of the day, Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena, California. It was there that she met her future husband, Marshall McLUHAN, a graduate student at Cambridge University in England, who had travelled to Pasadena to visit his mother, a drama coach at the Playhouse.
The family wishes to extend its heartfelt thanks to Doctor Wendy BROWN, for her years of unflagging and tender care, and to special caregivers Sally, Bona, Tasie, Amy, and particularly Cynthia, who has stayed at Corinne's side day and night for the last four years.
There will be a funeral mass at Holy Rosary Church, 354 St. Clair Avenue West on Monday April 7 at 1: 30 p.m.

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McLUHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-19 published
She was Marshall McLUHAN's great love ardent defender, supporter and critic
An aspiring actress from a privileged Texas family, she was swept off her feet by a young Canadian academic who would lay the cornerstone of modern media theory. She later edited his first big book
By Lisa FITTERMAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
When she was young, Corinne Lewis McLUHAN won a Mary Pickford look-alike contest, but woe betide any person who assumed that there wasn't much more to her than masses of dark hair, a wide smile and a disarming southern drawl. For Mrs. McLUHAN, actress, English teacher and wife to the unbending, irascible and brilliant Marshall, looks were just the medium in which she packaged a sharp intellect, a steely will and enough spirit to elope with a man who did not impress her upon first introduction.
"He was six-feet, two-inches, thin, with a little moustache," she once told a television interviewer. "He was very self-contained and very British, all with this peculiar Canadian accent. I thought he was the strangest duck I'd ever met!"
No one in her family, at least, ever envisioned her, a southern belle from Fort Worth, Texas, falling in mad love with a skinny, awkward academic from Edmonton with a penchant for poetry. After all, she was a direct descendant of one of Fort Worth's founders, while her great-grandfather had been the state's first carriage manufacturer and her own father, Charles Wallace LEWIS, provided a more-than-comfortable living for his family as the chief financial officer of the local Swift and Company packing plant. From her father, young Corinne learned to how to shoot and hunt, while her mother, the feisty Corinne Keller LEWIS, raised her and older sister, Carolyn, in the tradition of the Daughters of the American Revolution, complete with its motto of "God, Home and Country."
In this rarefied world, scholastic excellence was lauded, as was churchgoing and the pursuit of hobbies such as theatre. In high school, young Corinne was always a top student but she was also a key member of the drama club called the Vagabond Players, both directing and performing in plays such as Seven Keys to Baldpate, a whodunit by George M. Cohan for which the tagline was "Mystery writer and blonde… too scared to kiss… in mansion of fear!" In The Constant Wife, an extramarital farce by W. Somerset Maugham, she played Martha Culver, a prickly, cynical spinster who doesn't trust men one bit.
After graduating from high school in 1930, she was offered scholarships to several universities elsewhere in Texas, but her parents pressed her to remain in Fort Worth, where she attended Texas Christian University, completing a degree in general arts and pursuing her interest in drama. She also won poetry-recitation contests and honed her talent for public speaking.
Throughout, she had any number of gentleman callers, but she wasn't at all interested in living what she knew for the rest of her life. Rather, she decided to pursue her dramatic studies further, ending up in Pasadena, California, which had a well-regarded theatre school. There, a meeting with a teacher would change her life forever: Elsie McLUHAN, Marshall's mother and a force in her own right, had arrived to run a class after directing at a theatre in Detroit. At once, she decided the younger woman was the perfect match for her intellectual son, who was coming to visit her.
"She told me he was very handsome," Mrs. McLUHAN recalled in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio documentary. "She invited me over a lot and generally promoted our togetherness."
As part of their courtship, he would pick her up in Pasadena and drive to the countryside, where they'd lie on the grass and read poetry to each other. They hadn't been going together for very long when Marshall, who was working on his master's degree at Cambridge University, had to go back. He proposed marriage. She responded by suggesting that they write to each other for a while first. "But no, he wanted me to go with him or forget about it," she would say in another documentary about her husband. "I wasn't used to this kind of treatment. What made this man tick?"
In the end, she said yes. On August 4, 1939, they tied the knot she telegraphed her family the news only after the deed was done. "Mother knew they'd never accept him," said Stephanie McLUHAN, the fourth of the couple's six children. "Her family never particularly accepted him. Texas and Canada are still pretty different."
The newlyweds honeymooned in prewar Venice, sailing through the canals with gondoliers singing at the tops of their voices - until they descended one morning from their hotel room to learn that war appeared imminent. Their next stop was Paris, but they soon felt compelled to leave there, too; as Mrs. McLUHAN quickly packed, her husband ventured out to get provisions.
"He came with a bottle of Benedictine and a basket of pastries," she recalled in the same documentary. "We took the last train out of Paris and a boat across the Channel, which was crammed to the gills. We were the only ones with any food or drink on hand. We arrived in London the night before the war was declared, and then went down to Cambridge where we stayed for the year."
He got his master's in January, 1940, and though he would begin his doctoral dissertation soon after, the outbreak of war led the university to grant him permission to complete it in North America; it would be granted three years later without him having to travel back to make a defence. The couple sailed for the United States, stopping in St. Louis for a year because he had to work at a local university.
In 1944, they moved to Windsor, Ontario, where Doctor McLUHAN taught at Assumption College. Two years later, he joined the faculty at Saint Michael's College in Toronto. In the 1950s, he began to give the Communication and Culture seminars that would lead to the establishment, in 1963, of the Centre for Culture and Technology the university did so because, by then, Doctor McLUHAN was so famous he was receiving tempting offers from other institutions.
Mrs. McLUHAN was her husband's most ardent defender, fan, critic, editor and love. A staunch patriotism, an even stauncher faith in God (like Doctor McLUHAN, she was a convert to Catholicism) and an impish sense of fun would help guide her throughout her life, through the raising of six children and through the leaner years before her husband gained renown. She never renounced her U.S. citizenship and prayed regularly, while author B.W. Powe, who first met her in 1978 at a Christmas party at the McLUHAN home in Toronto's tony Wychwood Park, recalls that she was in the kitchen, spiking the punch with lots of alcohol.
"She poured and sang," Mr. Powe wrote in an e-mail. "You must picture her: tall, elegant, with a Texan drawl and that bright, broad smile, much laughter in her face. There she was, singing and pouring in the alcohol so that we, Marshall's grads, would no doubt happily reel out into the good Christmas night."
The McLUHANs were devoted parents, although Stephanie McLUHAN speculates that her mother's experience as a stage director must have helped, for it was she who did most of the day-to-day raising of her and her siblings, of listening, disciplining, bandaging and counselling. Her husband may have popularized terms and phrases such as "global village" and "the medium is the message" but he was stymied by the sheer noise of children, sometimes even retreating to a table in the backyard when weather permitted so he could work in peace and quiet.
"They expected us to excel," said Stephanie, who now runs the Canada Institute program for the Washington, D.C.-based Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. "Mom was a voracious reader and a real confidante to my father. She edited his first major book, The Gutenberg Galaxy. Dad was a stellar verbal person but when he sat down to write, he needed help.
"They had a real partnership in addition to marriage," she continued. "Dad just adored her."
In 1979, Doctor McLUHAN suffered a stroke that robbed him of his ability to speak, read and write. While it broke his wife's heart that they couldn't continue the intellectual discussions they'd been having ever since they first met, they continued with their regular walks around Wychwood Park. She would guide him and he'd stay fast by her side - just like it had always been.
Corinne Lewis McLUHAN was born April 11, 1912, in Fort Worth, Texas She died April 4, 2008, of natural causes at her home in Toronto. She was 95. She leaves her children: Eric, Mary, Teri, Stephanie, Elizabeth and Michael. She also leaves grandchildren Jennifer Colton THUET, Emily McLuhan BOMS, Anna and Andrew McLUHAN, Claire and Madeleine McLuhan MYERS and Arthur, Mark and Gwendolyn McLUHAN, and her great-grandchildren, Olivia, Charlotte and Gillian.

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McCLURE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-07 published
MOONEY, Doctor Alfred Henry, D.V.M.
Passed away on Saturday, April 5th, 2008. Doctor Alfred Henry MOONEY, of Durham, in his 90th year. Beloved husband of the late Marie DWYER. Loving father of Agnes and her husband Kent BENSON of Kenilworth and Eileen and her husband Conrad ELVIDGE of Durham. Fondly remembered by his 4 grand_sons and his one great-grand_son. Dear brother of Margaret McCLURE of Paisley. Dearly loved uncle of Yvonne GONDER and family. Predeceased by his son William MOONEY and his sister Irene McTEER. Friends may call at the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham on Monday evening from 6-9 p.m. A private family service will be held at the Funeral Home. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Grey Bruce Animal Shelter or the DCHCF -- Durham Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

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McCLURE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-26 published
VIRTUE, Cecil John
At the South Bruce Grey Health Centre in Chesley on Friday April 25, 2008. Cecil VIRTUE, formerly of Tara in his 87th year. Beloved husband of the late former Gertrude McARTHUR. Dear companion of Dorothy LOUCKS of Elgin Abbey, Chesley. Father of Iona and her husband Bob McCLURE of Pike Lake and Gerry and his wife Jackie of Alberta. Also survived by grandchildren Brad and Rod McCLURE, Cheryl BOYCHUK (McCLURE) and Wayne, Tim, Terry and Gerri VIRTUE and 11 great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Iola BEIRNES and her husband Earl of Sauble Beach and brother-in-law of Alma VIRTUE of Port Elgin. Predeceased by brothers Arley, Jim, Russell and Harry. Friends may call at the Paul H. Eagleson Funeral Home in Tara on Tuesday April 29, 2008 from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. The funeral sevices will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 at 11 a.m. Interment in Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Condolences may be expressed online at www.paulheaglesonfuneralhome.ca

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McCLURE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-07 published
EMPTAGE, Marcella " Mary" Sarah (née McCLURE)
Marcella 'Mary' Sarah EMPTAGE, beloved wife of Elgin EMPTAGE, formerly of Meaford, passed away peacefully at Georgian Heights in Owen Sound where they had been currently residing, on Monday May 5, 2008, at the age of 91. Born in Trafalgar, Mary was the daughter of the late William and Olive (née JOHNSTONE) McCLURE. She was predeceased by her brother James William McCLURE. Mary will be fondly remembered as a dear sister-in-law by Margaret “Peggy” MARSHALL of Owen Sound, and Pearl EMPTAGE of Blind River and as a dear aunt by her several nieces and their families. Funeral services will be conducted at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher St. E., Meaford, N4L 1B9 (519-538-1320) on Wednesday May 7 at 3: 30 p.m. with interment to follow at Lakeview Cemetery. Visiting at the funeral home the hour prior to service. As your expression of sympathy, donations to Great Lakes Christian College or a charity of your choice would be appreciated and may be made through the funeral home to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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McCLURE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-09 published
DALTON, Robert A.
At Seaforth Manor Nursing Home on Saturday, June 7, 2008, Robert A. DALTON of Hullett Township, in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Dorothy (McCLURE) DALTON for over 58 years. Dear father of Blanche COADY of Mitchell, Carl (Kelly) DALTON and his wife Sharon of R.R.#1, Londesborough and Kathy and her husband Ron WARD of Staffa. Loving grandfather of Jamie (Jennifer) DALTON, Jason DALTON (Pat CAMPBELL), Kelly-Ann DALTON, Jennifer WARD (Rick KERR) and Michael WARD and great-grandfather of Niamh DALTON and Cameron KERR. Remembered by brother Murray (Dick) DALTON and his wife Janet, sister Doris MUIR, sister-in-law Mavis DALTON and brother-in-law Walter McCLURE, all of Seaforth, and Fern McCLURE of Egmondville. Also survived by many nieces and nephews and great-nieces and great-nephews. Predeceased by his parents Carl and Janet (SMITH) DALTON, brothers Percy DALTON and Doug DALTON and brother-in-law Dave MUIR. Family will receive Friends at the Whitney-Ribey Funeral Home, 87 Goderich Street West, Seaforth on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Northside United Church on Tuesday, June 10 at 2: 00 p.m. Rev. John GOULD will officiate. Interment Maitlandbank Cemetery, Seaforth. Memorial donations to Canadian Cancer Society, Canadian Diabetes Association or Cavan United Church, Winthrop appreciated. Condolences at www.whitneyribeyfuneralhome.com

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McCLURE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-14 published
JAMIESON, Dorothy Elizabeth "Betty" (formerly McLACHLIN, née WICKENS)
(March 28th, 1918-February 10th, 2008)
Dorothy Elizabeth Wickens McLachlin JAMIESON passed away peacefully at the Sarcee Hospice in Calgary on Sunday, February 10, 2008 in her 90th year. Betty will be lovingly remembered by her five children: Mary GISH of Lacombe, Pam McLACHLIN of Edmonton, Stephen McLACHLIN of Calgary, Sandy (James) McCLURE of Calgary, and Craig JAMIESON (Denise) of Boise, Idaho. Betty was the loving grandmother of her eight grandchildren: Corey GISH (Shawn RICE) of Lacombe, Chad (Michelle) GISH of Olds, Samantha BALL (Mark) of Brampton, Ontario, James BALL of Edmonton, Brett (Laurie) McCLURE of Calgary, Grant (Rebecca) McCLURE of Victoria, Megan McCLURE of Cape Town, South Africa, and Alisha JAMIESON of Boise, Idaho. Betty was very proud of her seven great-grandchildren Catherine, Lewis, Jada, Jared, Morgan, Sasha and Aiden. She is also survived by three sisters-in-law: Norma WICKENS of Toronto, Audrey McLACHLIN of London, Ontario and Joan McCOMBE of Penticton. She also had many nieces and nephews as well as a life's journey of Friends. Betty was predeceased by her first husband Allan (Mac) McLACHLIN in 1977, her second husband Ian JAMIESON in 1999, her parents Cora (1956) and Stephen WICKENS (1973,) her sisters Kathleen (1931) and Phyllis (2003) and her brother Ewart (2005). Betty led an exciting life filled with family and Friends. She lived many places in the world with her husband Mac when he was transferred often as a petroleum engineer with Shell Canada, always making a home for her family in each new place. She was a Life Member of the Girl Guides of Canada having filled roles as troop leader in many communities and on provincial executives. She sang with the Sweet Adeline choruses in Edmonton, Calgary and Nanaimo. She was committed to many charity organizations over the years. She and her second husband, Ian, became Snowbirds living in Sun City, Arizona and loving golf, the climate and their many Friends as only retirees can do. Betty was currently living in Calgary and had made many wonderful Friends in her new home. Betty always had time for her family and Friends. Throughout her life, she loved well and was, in turn, well-loved by everyone who knew her. Betty had a quick sense of humour, which so many of us will remember and cherish. A Celebration of Betty's life will be held at First Memorial Funeral Services, 240-17th Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta on Friday, February 15th, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. A small tea will be held afterwards. The Family would like to thank Doctor Jamieson of the Foothills Hospital and all the wonderful nursing and administrative staff in Unit 72. In addition, we thank everyone at the Sarcee Hospice. With their care, love and support of not only our Mother but also all of our Family, they helped us through this difficult time with grace, dignity and understanding. If Friends so desire, tributes in memory of Betty JAMIESON may be made directly to The Sarcee Hospice, 3504 - 29th Street S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T3E 2L3 or to The Juvenile Diabetes Foundation of Canada, Calgary Chapter, #417, 5920-1A Street S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2H 0G3. Arrangements and Cremation in care of First Memorial Funeral Services Directors, Phone (403) 216-2222 www.firstmemorialfuneral.com

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McCLURE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-01 published
SMITH, Grace Evalyn (née McCLURE)
Passed away in Victoria on January 7th, 2008, at the age of 87. A well-known Victoria artist famous for portraits of people and pets. Her soft voice and pleasant smile will be missed by all. Predeceased by grand_son David, sisters Laura, Ruth and brother David. Survived by her husband Arnell, son Drew, daughter Avril, 8 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, 1 great-great-granddaughter, 2 nieces, 3 nephews and sister Edith. Celebration of life will be held at First Memorial, 4725 Falaise Drive, Victoria, British Columbia at 2 p.m., April 12, 2008. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Society.

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McLURG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-28 published
McLURG, A. James " Jim"
With great sadness, A. James (Jim) McLURG died at Tillsonburg Hospital on February 25, 2008 in his 79th year. Born in London, Ontario. Predeceased by his wife, Mary McLURG (1986.) Dear father of Suzanne TURNER (Jerry) of Tillsonburg, David McLURG (Vera) of Arizona. Grandad to Allison and twins, Kyle and Logan. Step grandfather to Kelly TURNER (Mike) and Great Papa to Jason, Kiara and Kirstin. Jim was an avid reader with particular interest in architecture and history. Many thanks to Doctor SOHLA, Community Care Access Centre, Home Care and 2 South Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital for their support and care. Donations to The Canadian Cancer Society appreciated in lieu of flowers. A Memorial Reception will be held on Saturday, March 1st at the Delta Armouries, 325 Dundas Street, London from 2: 00-5:00 p.m. Arrangements entrusted to Ostrander's Funeral Home, 43 Bidwell St. Tillsonburg (519 842-5221) Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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